Manager's right to manage

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The manager's right to manage is the legitimation in capitalism, or other industrial societies, of the disciplinary powers that managers claim over workers. It is fundamentally related to the property rights of the person claiming to own particular means and tools of production, and their agents to act on their behalf, in directing wage labourers to perform duties. Closely related to the Master and servant relationship in industrial law, the manager's right to manage is often contested by day to day industrial resistance, or organised bodies of workers, such as revolutionary industrial unions.

See also[edit]

8Managerial prerogative

References[edit]

  • Kuhn, J W "Does Collective Bargaining Usurp the Manager's Right to Manage?" Journal of Occupational Medicine 2:11 1960, 570.
  • Jane Broadbent, Michael Dietrich, Jennifer Roberts "The end of the professions?" in The end of the professions?: the restructuring of professional work eds Jane Broadbent, Michael Dietrich, Jennifer Roberts, Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 1997: 4