Mancelona, Michigan

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Mancelona, Michigan
Village
Location of Mancelona, Michigan
Location of Mancelona, Michigan
Coordinates: 44°54′14″N 85°3′38″W / 44.90389°N 85.06056°W / 44.90389; -85.06056Coordinates: 44°54′14″N 85°3′38″W / 44.90389°N 85.06056°W / 44.90389; -85.06056
Country United States
State Michigan
County Antrim
Area[1]
 • Total 1.00 sq mi (2.59 km2)
 • Land 1.00 sq mi (2.59 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,125 ft (343 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,390
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,381
 • Density 1,390.0/sq mi (536.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 49659
Area code(s) 231
FIPS code 26-50620[4]
GNIS feature ID 0631374[5]

Mancelona /mænˌsɪˈlnə/ is a village in Antrim County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,390 at the 2010 census. The village is located within Mancelona Township.

History[edit]

Mancelona Andress, daughter of Perry Andress, was born March 28, 1865 in Missouri. She came to the Mancelona area in 1869, when she was four years old. Her father was the first settler to locate at the site of the town.The township, and later, the village of Mancelona, took its name from her. In 1871 the Township was authorized by the Legislature in Antrim County. People came first primarily to farm. In 1872 the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad arrive opening up the Village to southern and northern trade centers. In 1882 a John Otis built a blast furnace in the unincorporated village of Antrim.

Current events[edit]

Mancelona is probably best known for its annual buck pole, a deer hunting contest that has drawn hunters from across the State. Additionally, Mancelona hosts the annual "Bass Festival", a four-day event featuring a Grand Parade, carnival, flea market, and other community activities. The Bass Festival is held the first weekend in June. In 1999, a new high school was opened, and renovations to the middle school were completed. Up until recently, the town had three factories that employed most of the town. The largest factory, a Dura Automotive Systems plant, closed in February 2009 and the community has had a change for the worse. From 1947 to 1967, Mount Clemens Industries, Incorporated, formerly Mt. Clemens Metal Products Company, used trichloroethylene (TCE) in vapor degreasers. Afterwards, the TCE was disposed of by dumping it on the ground near the building. Some TCE may also have been dumped into seepage pits and burned. Through these improper disposal methods, TCE has now contaminated the groundwater in and around Mancelona, MI. The contaminated plume begins at the manufacturing plant, currently known as Dura Automotive Manufacturing Plant, and extends approximately six miles to the northwest to the Schuss Mountain/Shanty Creek Resort area. The leading edge of the Wickes Manufacturing TCE Plume (also known as Mancelona-Cedar River TCE Plume), at the resort area, is approximately 1.25 miles wide. The plume has also reached the Cedar River, and is now contaminating a cold-water, high quality trout stream. TCE is a colorless liquid with a sweet odor similar to chloroform. TCE is most commonly used as a degreasing solvent in manufacturing plants. Breathing small amounts may cause headaches, dizziness, lung irritation, and difficulty concentrating. Drinking water that contains TCE over an extended period of time can lead to liver and kidney problems and may also be carcinogenic. The TOSC Program at Michigan State University has been asked to provide assistance to Mancelona-area citizens regarding the Mancelona-Cedar River TCE Plume. TOSC met with Antrim County United through Ecology (ACUTE) and Mancelona-area citizens to assess community concerns and discuss TOSC's involvement. TOSC has developed a Memorandum of Understanding, which has been signed jointly by ACUTE and TOSC. [6] While the Mancelona area is as of 2012 the focus of extensive natural gas production activities associated with the Antrim Shale formation, this production does not support employment sufficient to recompense the community for the factories it once had.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.00 square mile (2.59 km2), all of it land.[1] The village is located at 44°54′08″N 85°03′39″W / 44.90222°N 85.06083°W / 44.90222; -85.06083

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,390 people, 518 households, and 349 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,390.0 inhabitants per square mile (536.7/km2). There were 594 housing units at an average density of 594.0 per square mile (229.3/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 94.9% White, 0.1% African American, 1.2% Native American, and 3.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population.

There were 518 households of which 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.9% were married couples living together, 19.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.6% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.19.

The median age in the village was 34.1 years. 29.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.9% were from 25 to 44; 23.2% were from 45 to 64; and 12.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 47.3% male and 52.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,408 people, 535 households, and 367 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,420.7 per square mile (549.1/km²). There were 582 housing units at an average density of 587.3 per square mile (227.0/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.60% White, 0.36% African American, 1.35% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.71% from other races, and 1.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.20% of the population.

There were 535 households out of which 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the village the population was spread out with 28.9% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 89.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.1 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $29,583, and the median income for a family was $32,375. Males had a median income of $25,313 versus $18,917 for females. The per capita income for the village was $12,391. About 14.1% of families and 17.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.5% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over.

Major highways[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130313/METRO/303130356/Pollution-problems-continue-Michigan-funds-clean-up-dry-up?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CFRONTPAGE%7Cp