Mangog

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Mangog
Mangog on the cover of Thor #155 (Aug. 1968). Art by Jack Kirby and Vince Colletta.
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Thor #154 (July 1968)
Created by Stan Lee (writer)
Jack Kirby (artist)
In-story information
Partnerships Thanos
Notable aliases Odin
Abilities Superhuman strength, stamina, durability, and endurance
Immortality
Shapeshifting
Energy projection
Empathic ability to feed on the hatred of sentient beings

Mangog is a fictional character that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Publication history[edit]

The character first appeared in Thor #154 (July 1968) and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

Fictional character biography[edit]

Mangog debuted in a multi-issue storyline in the title Thor, and is depicted as being the sum total of the hatred of "a billion billion beings" of the Vanir that were once killed by Odin, the ruler of Asgard and the Norse gods. Imprisoned beneath Asgard, Mangog is accidentally freed by the rock troll Ulik, who sees a warning on the prison door not to release the occupant, and does so hoping they will make a useful ally against Asgard. When Mangog is released, he easily defeats Ulik then storms Asgard intent on drawing the Odinsword from its scabbard which will end the universe. Odin's son Thor battles Mangog to a standstill until Odin defeats Mangog by restoring the race he slew to life which reduces the creature to a diminutive size.[1]

Mangog reappears when freed by the god Loki, but was defeated when cut off from the source of its power.[2] Mangog was later aided by the traitorous magician Igron. Mangog assumes the form of an imprisoned Odin, and takes part of each Asgardian's lifeforce, weakening them, and plans to draw the Odinsword. After a series of skirmishes with Thor, the creature is defeated when Thor frees Odin.[3]

The character appears in the second volume of Thor as the servant of the Titan Thanos, who is seeking universal domination. Mangog is eventually destroyed by Thor (the character places his mystic hammer Mjolnir in the creature's mouth and blasts it internally) and Thanos (later revealed to have been a clone of Thanos[volume & issue needed]) was defeated.[4] Later, Mangog is again destroyed by Thor, seemingly for good when Thor used the Odinforce to erase him from existence.[5]

However, the Mangog returns in the pages of the Thunderstrike mini-series when he is accidentally summoned by a mystical generator used by megalomaniac Adam Mann. When Thor wonders at his return asserting his previous destruction, the Mangog scornfully replies that hatred can be suppressed or rejected, but never destroyed. He is banished once again where he is cast into the fire of a distant star.[6]

Powers and abilities[edit]

Mangog possesses the strength, stamina, durability, and endurance of a "billion billion beings",[7] considerably exceeding that of Thor, and has the ability to manipulate magic for energy projection and shapeshifting.

He appears to be immortal and ultimately indestructible, existing so long as hatred does, and indeed draws strength from hate itself, even that of his enemies.[8]

Other versions[edit]

Marvel Fanfare[edit]

In an alternate universe story in the title Marvel Fanfare, Mangog battles the Herald of Galactus, Silver Surfer.[9]

What If?[edit]

In the What If? story "What if Jane Foster Found the Hammer of Thor?", Thordis (Foster) and Don Blake are taken to Asgard by Sif to help stop Mangog's attempt to destroy the universe. Thordis ultimately stops him by summoning a storm that revives Odin from the Odinsleep, allowing him to dispatch Mangog.[volume & issue needed]

Ultimate Marvel[edit]

In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Mangog appears in Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man #150, a story which is being told by Thor to the Ultimates about Spider-Man's heroism. Here, Mangog is a mortal sorcerer named Xandu who breaks into a museum and steals the lost eye of Avalon which transforms him into Mangog. Mangog is then defeated by Spider-Man and Thor and then reverts to a mortal.[10]

In other media[edit]

Television[edit]

  • Mangog appears in the Avengers Assemble episode "All-Father's Day", voiced by J.B. Blanc.[11] He has a history with Odin, who had barred him from entering Asgard. Upon finding out that Odin is on Earth, Mangog interrupts Odin's duel with the Avengers in order to take revenge on Odin. Odin manages to hold his own against Mangog until he managed to knock Odin down. Mangog then takes Odin's Gungir in order to combine it with his own weapon. Thor and the rest of the Avengers had to work to disarm Mangog of his weapon. Once that was done, Odin reclaims Gungir and has Heimdall open a portal to send Mangog to another location. Before disappearing into the portal, Mangog still plans to get revenge on Odin.

Video games[edit]

  • Mangog is featured in the Thor: God of Thunder video game (which takes place before the events of the 2011 Thor film) voiced simultaneously by Steven Blum, Robin Atkin Downes, Mitch Lewis, Lisa Moncure, and Mari Weiss. It is revealed that Odin once created Mangog and bound him with Scabrite chains to prevent him from destroying anything else than what his will tells him. His chains broke free and the creature devoured the souls of the Vanir. Loki tricks Thor into releasing Mangog from his imprisonment as part of a plan to discredit his brother, but he is forced to help Thor return to Asgard when his own plan to destroy Mangog fails. Having defeated Mangog's invading allies to deprive him of the hatred that empowers him, Thor fights against Mangog with while Odin strikes Mangog with spears to damage his armor. As the fight concludes, Odin allows the souls that empowered Mangog to pass on to their reward and peace in the afterlife.

Board games[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thor #154-157 (July-Oct. 1968)
  2. ^ Thor #195-198 (Jan.-April 1972)
  3. ^ Thor #242 (Dec. 1975); 244 (Feb. 1975) 246-250 (April-Aug. 1976)
  4. ^ Thor vol. 2, #20-25 (Feb.-July 2000)
  5. ^ Thor vol. 2, #84 (Nov. 2004)
  6. ^ Thunderstrike vol. 2 #5
  7. ^ Thor #157 (Oct. 1968)
  8. ^ Thunderstrike v.2 #5
  9. ^ Marvel Fanfare #51 (June 1982)
  10. ^ Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man #150
  11. ^ "Marvel's Avengers Assemble, "All-Father's Day"". 23 Mar 2014. Retrieved 30 Mar 2014. 

External links[edit]