Mangyongdae Revolutionary School

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Mangyongdae Revolutionary School
Established 1947 (1947)
Type military high school
male male
Affiliation Kang Pan Sok Revolutionary School in the western city of Nampho
Affiliations Army
Administrator Lt. Col. Kim Hak Bin
Founder Kim Il-sung
Teaching staff Ri Kyong Hui
Location Pyongyang, DPRK
Coordinates 38°59′54″N 125°39′43″E / 38.99833°N 125.66194°E / 38.99833; 125.66194Coordinates: 38°59′54″N 125°39′43″E / 38.99833°N 125.66194°E / 38.99833; 125.66194
District Mangyongdae district
National ranking elite

Mangyongdae Revolutionary School is an elite school[1] in Mangyongdae district, Pyongyang, North Korea.[2] Established in 1947,[3] it is a special education school with access only to the children of war dead, Party, military, administrative and high-ranking officials’ families.[2][4] Originally, the school was called the Magyongdae School for the Bereaved Children of Revolutionaries, which was to "receive children of fallen revolutionaries" and "educate the their children and train them into fine revolutionaries after the independence of Korea.[5] It was located at Kan-ri, Daedong, South Pyongan. After the formal establishement of North Korea it was moved to Pyongyang and there the first statue of Kim Il-sung was erected, according to North Korean authorities, at the suggestion of Kim Jong Suk, Kim Il Sung’s wife.[6]

As of April 2012, Lt. Col. Kim Hak Bin is an administrator at the school.[7] Ri Kyong Hui is a biology teacher.[7]

At one time, Kim Won-ju, who was Kim Hyong-rok's third son, was assigned the position as State Security Department officer whose assignments included rooting out disloyalty to the regime among students at the ultra-elite Mangyongdae School.".[1]

In addition to a high school curriculum, students receive military training.[8] Graduates enter the army for three years and usually become party members.[8] Generally, about 120 students graduate per year.[8] According to Kang Myong-do, "children of the elite, who in the past would have gone to Namsan now went to Mangyongdae." If the parent's of a child were still alive, then only children of officials at least at the level of party department head were eligible to enroll.[9]

In 1982, O Guk-ryol, the then chief of the armed forces staff, said the school produced revolutionary warriors.[8]

By 1987, graduates[8] were:

  • 20% of the central party committee,
  • 30% of the party politburo, and
  • 32% of the military commission of the central committee.

As of April 2013, the all girls version of this school is at the Kang Pan Sok Revolutionary School in the western city of Nampho.[7][10]

Kim Jong-un is not an alunni of this school.[7]

Alumni[edit]

  • VMar Kim Yong Chun (NDC Vice Chairman and Minister of the People’s Armed Forces)[14]
  • General Hyon Chol Hae (Director of the NDC Standing Committee [Presidium])[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 189. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  2. ^ a b Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  3. ^ "A glance at the Revolutionary School for elites in Pyongyang". SINA.com. 5 July 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013. 
  4. ^ Bayly, Tom (22 April 2013). "Inside a school shaping N Korea's future military leaders". BBC. Retrieved 21 August 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 191. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  6. ^ "There Is Even a Bunker for Statues in Case of Emergencies". Daily NK. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "North Korean pre-teens training to 'seek revenge on American imperialists". The Daily News by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. April 20, 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013. "His son, current leader Kim Jong Un, did not." 
  8. ^ a b c d e Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 471. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  9. ^ Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 472. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  10. ^ "Kim Jong Un checks the samples of overcoats for the children of Mangyongdae Revolutionary School and Kang Pan Sok Revolutionary School on March 24, 2013". Reuters/KCNA). March 24, 2013. Retrieved 21 August 2013. 
  11. ^ Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 471. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  12. ^ Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 192. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  13. ^ Martin, Bradley K. (2004). Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader. New York: Thomas Dunne Books. p. 372. ISBN 0-312-32221-6. 
  14. ^ a b "Kim Jong Un Visits Air Force Unit #378 (Corrected)". KCNA. Retrieved 21 August 2013.