Manhattan Hungarian Network

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Founded in 2002, the Manhattan Hungarian Network (MHN) is a non-profit organization, founded in New York City by and for young professionals tied to, or interested in, Hungary and its culture. Its mission is to foster a spirit of goodwill between Hungarians and Americans by strengthening cultural, economic and social ties between Hungary and the United States.

The organization holds social and business networking events, literary readings, lectures, concerts, film screenings and black tie galas. Since its inception, the Manhattan Hungarian Network has hosted numerous prominent government/business leaders and diplomats, including Péter Medgyessy, former Prime Minister of Hungary; the Hungarian Minister of Finance, Csaba László; the Hungarian Minister of Justice, Péter Bárándy; the Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs, László Kovács; Hungarian Secretary of State, Attila Weber, and the Hungarian Deputy Minister of Education, Dr. Szabados amongst others. MHN also assisted in organizing Dr. Otto von Habsburg's U.S. tour in April 2005.[1]

The organization has presented notable artists such as Hungarian pop singer Gábor Presser, soprano of the Hungarian State Opera, Ildikó Iván, novelist Arthur Phillips, novelist and poet Gabor Gorgey and journalist Adam LeBor.

On May 1, 2004, MHN hosted the Grand Europe Ball, a historic black tie charitable affair at New York's Waldorf Astoria Hotel to celebrate the Enlargement of the European Union to include ten new member states (Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia). Archduke Georg of Austria-Hungary was its co-chairman. In 2005 MHN participated in Nations of New York, New York’s bid to host the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games in 2012.

The Manhattan Hungarian Network is a member of the Hungarian-American Coalition, a league of nonprofit organizations in the United States.[2] The board of directors of MHN is composed of Elizabeth Vilmik and Erzsébet Karkus.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]