Mann (military rank)

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For other uses, see Mann (disambiguation).
SS rank insignia patterns from 1933.

Mann (German for "man", "male", "husband", or "fellow"), was a paramilitary rank used by several Nazi Party paramilitary organizations between 1925 and 1945. The rank is most often associated with the SS, and also as a rank of the SA where Mann was the lowest enlisted rank and was the equivalent of a private.[1][2]

In 1938, with the rise of the SS-Verfügungstruppe (later renamed the Waffen-SS), the SS changed the rank of SS-Mann to Schütze, although still retained the original SS rank of Mann for the Allgemeine-SS (general SS). The rank of Mann was junior to SS-Sturmmann.

In most Nazi Party organizations, the rank of Mann held no distinctive insignia. Some groups, however, granted a minor form of rank insignia such as a blank collar patch or simple shoulder board to denote the rank of Mann.[3] (see right: SS rank insignia pattern from 1933)

Even lower ranks, e.g. Bewerber, Jungmann, Anwärter, Vollanwärter, were established in the mid-1930s as a recruit or candidate position, held by an individual seeking an appointment as a Mann in a Nazi Party paramilitary organization.[1]

Rank insignian of the Allgemeine SS and Waffen-SS
Candidate status
  • SS-Bewerber (Staffel-Bewerber)
  • SS-Jungmann (Staffel-Jungmann)
  • SS-Anwärter (Staffel-Anwärter)
  • SS-Vollanwärter (Staffel-Vollanwärter)
1st rank Allgemeine SS
SS-Mann
2nd rank
no equivalent
3rd rank
SS-Sturmmann
Volunteer for joining the Waffen-SS
  • SS-Bewerber (Staffel-Bewerber)
  • SS-Jungmann (Staffel-Jungmann)
  • SS-Anwärter (Staffel-Anwärter)
1st Rank Waffen-SS
SS-Schütze
2nd rank
SS-Oberschütze
3rd rank
SS-Sturmmann
Candidate status
SA-Anwärter
1st SA rank
SA-Mann
2nd rank
no equivalent
3rd rank
SA-Sturmmann
person liable to military service
Wehrmacht
1st Wehrmacht rank
Soldat
2nd rank
Oberschütze
3rd rank
Gefreiter

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b McNab 2009, p. 30.
  2. ^ McNab (II) 2009, p. 15.
  3. ^ Flaherty 2004, p. 148.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Flaherty, T. H. (2004) [1988]. The Third Reich: The SS. Time-Life Books, Inc. ISBN 1 84447 073 3. 
  • McNab, Chris (2009). The SS: 1923–1945. Amber Books Ltd. ISBN 1906626499. 
  • McNab (II), Chris (2009). The Third Reich. Amber Books Ltd. ISBN 978-1-906626-51-8. 

External links[edit]