Mansfield-et-Pontefract, Quebec

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Mansfield-et-Pontefract
Municipality
Mansfield-et-Pontefract QC.jpg
Location within Pontiac RCM.
Location within Pontiac RCM.
Mansfield-et-Pontefract is located in Western Quebec
Mansfield-et-Pontefract
Mansfield-et-Pontefract
Location in western Quebec.
Coordinates: 45°51′40″N 76°44′21″W / 45.86111°N 76.73917°W / 45.86111; -76.73917Coordinates: 45°51′40″N 76°44′21″W / 45.86111°N 76.73917°W / 45.86111; -76.73917[1]
Country  Canada
Province  Quebec
Region Outaouais
RCM Pontiac
Constituted January 1, 1868
Government[2]
 • Mayor Kathleen Bélec
 • Federal riding Pontiac
 • Prov. riding Pontiac
Area[2][3]
 • Total 525.10 km2 (202.74 sq mi)
 • Land 474.80 km2 (183.32 sq mi)
Population (2011)[3]
 • Total 2,204
 • Density 4.6/km2 (12/sq mi)
 • Pop 2006-2011 Increase 6.2%
 • Dwellings 1,030
Time zone EST (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC−4)
Postal code(s) J0X 1R0
Area code(s) 819
Highways Route 148
The chutes on the Coulonge River.
The Bryson House, built in the 19th century and a Quebec historical site since 1980.

Mansfield-et-Pontefract is a municipality in the Pontiac Regional County Municipality of western Quebec, Canada. It is located on the Ottawa River, northwest of Gatineau. It is the most populated municipality in the Pontiac Regional County Municipality, with most of the population and businesses concentrated along Quebec Route 148.[4]

It is home to the main tourist attractions of the Pontiac region: the Chutes Coulonge, the George Bryson House, and the Félix-Gabriel-Marchand Bridge.

Communities[edit]

  • Davidson
  • Dépôt Davidson
  • Devonshire Park
  • Jim Lake
  • Leclair
  • Mansfield

History[edit]

In 1849, the Mansfield Township was formed that was incorporated as a township municipality in 1855. It may have been named after an English town in Nottinghamshire or in honour of Sir James Mansfield (1733-1821), Solicitor General of Canada in 1780, or William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield (1705–1793). In 1863, Pontefract Township was officially established, named after an English town in Yorkshire.[1]

On January 1, 1868, the townships were merged to form the United Township Municipality of Mansfield-et-Pontefract. In 1888, a portion of its territory separated and was incorporated as the Village Municipality of Fort-Coulonge. In 2003, Mansfield-et-Pontefract changed its status from united township municipality to an ordinary municipality.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Population[edit]

Historical Census Data - Mansfield-et-Pontefract, Quebec[7]
Year Pop. ±%
1991 1,902 —    
1996 2,115 +11.2%
Year Pop. ±%
2001 2,077 −1.8%
2006 2,064 −0.6%
Year Pop. ±%
2006A 2,075 +0.5%
2011 2,204 +6.2%
2006A data adjustment following Census publication.

Language[edit]

Mother tongue:[5]

  • English as first language: 15.8%
  • French as first language: 82.7%
  • English and French as first language: 0%
  • Other as first language: 1.5%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Mansfield-et-Pontefract (Municipalité)" (in French). Commission de toponymie du Québec. Retrieved 2011-04-11. 
  2. ^ a b "Mansfield-et-Pontefract". Répertoire des municipalités (in French). Ministère des Affaires municipales, des Régions et de l'Occupation du territoire. Retrieved 2011-04-11. 
  3. ^ a b c "Mansfield-et-Pontefract census profile". 2011 Census of Population. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  4. ^ Lisa Corrigan. "Municipality". Municipality of Mansfield-et-Pontefract. Retrieved 2011-04-12. 
  5. ^ a b "2006 Community Profiles". Canada 2006 Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2011-04-11. 
  6. ^ "2001 Community Profiles". Canada 2001 Census. Statistics Canada. February 17, 2012. Retrieved 2011-04-11. 
  7. ^ Statistics Canada: 1996, 2001, 2006, 2011 census

External links[edit]