Mansfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey

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For the township in Warren County, see Mansfield Township, Warren County, New Jersey.
Mansfield Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mansfield
Mansfield Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mansfield Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mansfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mansfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°05′15″N 74°42′44″W / 40.087416°N 74.712259°W / 40.087416; -74.712259Coordinates: 40°05′15″N 74°42′44″W / 40.087416°N 74.712259°W / 40.087416; -74.712259[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Burlington
Formed November 6, 1688
Royal charter May 9, 1770
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Arthur Puglia (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Linda Semus [4]
Area[2]
 • Total 21.907 sq mi (56.740 km2)
 • Land 21.740 sq mi (56.307 km2)
 • Water 0.167 sq mi (0.432 km2)  0.76%
Elevation [6] 66 ft (20 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 8,544
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 8,629
 • Rank 268th of 566 in state
19th of 40 in county[11]
 • Density 393.0/sq mi (151.7/km2)
 • Density rank 461st of 566 in state
31st of 40 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08022 - Columbus[12]
Area code(s) 609[13]
FIPS code 340053290[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882108[16][2]
Website www.mansfieldburlington.com

Mansfield Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,544.[8][9][17] The population increased by 3,454 (+67.9%) from the 5,090 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,216 (+31.4%) from the 3,874 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

History[edit]

Mansfield was first formed on November 6, 1688, and reformed by Royal charter on May 9, 1770. Mansfield was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken to form Fieldsboro (March 7, 1850, within township; became fully independent c. 1894), Bordentown Township (March 8, 1852) and Florence Township (March 7, 1872).[19]

Geography[edit]

Mansfield Township is located at 40°05′15″N 74°42′44″W / 40.087416°N 74.712259°W / 40.087416; -74.712259 (40.087416,-74.712259). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 21.907 square miles (56.740 km2), of which, 21.740 square miles (56.307 km2) of it was land and 0.167 square miles (0.432 km2) of it (0.76%) was water.[1][2]

Mansfield Township encompasses the unincorporated communities of Columbus (where the town hall is located), Georgetown, Hedding and Kinkora. The hamlets are Mansfield and Rising Sun Square (also known as Mansfield Square). "Homestead," a retirement village, consists of 1,200 homes in Columbus.[20]

Liberty Lake is a 6-acre (24,000 m2) freshwater spring-fed lake, that allows boating, swimming and fishing.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,810
1820 1,927 6.5%
1830 2,083 8.1%
1840 2,401 15.3%
1850 2,953 23.0%
1860 2,777 * −6.0%
1870 2,880 3.7%
1880 1,648 * −42.8%
1890 1,671 1.4%
1900 1,518 * −9.2%
1910 1,526 0.5%
1920 1,517 −0.6%
1930 1,709 12.7%
1940 1,642 −3.9%
1950 1,907 16.1%
1960 2,084 9.3%
1970 2,597 24.6%
1980 2,523 −2.8%
1990 3,874 53.5%
2000 5,090 31.4%
2010 8,544 67.9%
Est. 2012 8,629 [10] 1.0%
Population sources:
1810-2000[21] 1810-1920[22] 1840[23]
1850-1870[24] 1850[25] 1870[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[17][30] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previosu decade.[19]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,544 people, 3,401 households, and 2,452 families residing in the township. The population density was 393.0 per square mile (151.7 /km2). There were 3,529 housing units at an average density of 162.3 per square mile (62.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 79.04% (6,753) White, 10.42% (890) Black or African American, 0.16% (14) Native American, 7.69% (657) Asian, 0.06% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.62% (53) from other races, and 2.01% (172) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.01% (428) of the population.[7]

There were 3,401 households, of which 25.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.5% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.9% were non-families. 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.01.[7]

In the township, 20.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 18.3% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 27.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.9 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $74,671 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,953) and the median family income was $97,774 (+/- $17,454). Males had a median income of $62,215 (+/- $5,997) versus $57,917 (+/- $10,212) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,899 (+/- $4,224). About 2.5% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 5,090 people, 2,077 households, and 1,561 families residing in the township. The population density was 234.3 people per square mile (90.5/km²). There were 2,122 housing units at an average density of 97.7 per square mile (37.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.42% White, 1.91% African American, 0.18% Native American, 1.49% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.83% of the population.[17][30]

There were 2,077 households out of which 23.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.4% were married couples living together, 4.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.86.[17][30]

In the township the population was spread out with 18.7% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 21.4% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 31.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[17][30]

The median income for a household in the township was $50,757, and the median income for a family was $59,040. Males had a median income of $45,560 versus $40,968 for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,559. About 2.9% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.9% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[17][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Mansfield Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor. The Mayor presides at the meetings and votes as a member of the Committee. All formal legislative and executive powers are exercised by the Committee as a whole. The Township Committee assigns responsibility for the coordination of administrative and departmental functions among its members. Every Township board and department has at least one member of the Committee serving as a liaison.

As of 2013, members of the Mansfield Township Committee are Mayor Arthur R. Puglia (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2014; term as mayor ends 2013), Deputy Mayor Robert Higgins (R, term on committee ends 2015; term as deputy mayor ends 2013), Alfred W. "Fred" Clark (R, 2015), Janice A. DiGiuseppe (R, 2014) and Sean Gable (R, 2013).[32][33][34][35][36]

2013 revaluation issues[edit]

After a property revaluation was completed in 2013 and based on changes in tax levies by the municipality and the local school districts, the property tax rate increased by almost 50%, from $2.01 per $100 in assessed value in 2012 to $2.93 in 2013. A group of residents has complained to the New Jersey Division of Taxation, claiming that home values had been calculated incorrectly and arbitrarily, showing data that a sample of smaller homes saw taxes drop 8% while taxes on larger homes increased by 10%. The Mansfield Township tax assessor denied the claims and responded that the revaluation complied with all state legal requirements.[37]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

'Mount Pleasant', built in 1742 at Mount Pleasant, Mansfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, was the home of many generations of Shreves who descended from Caleb Shreve and Sarah Areson, his wife.

Mansfield Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[8][39][40] Prior to the 2010 Census, Mansfield Township had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[41] New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2004-15 Session, the 8th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Christopher J. Brown (R, Evesham Township) and Maria Rodriguez-Gregg (R, Evesham Township).[47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[50] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[50] As of 2014, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce Garganio (R, 2014; Florence Township),[51] Deputy Director Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[52] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[53] Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2016; Cinnaminson Township)[54] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[55][50][56] Gargiano was named in March 2014 to serve the unexpired term of Leah Arter and was chosen to fill her position as Freeholder Director.[57]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade attend the Mansfield Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[58]) are John Hydock Elementary School[59] (271 students in grades K-2) and Mansfield Township Elementary School[60] (434 students in PreK and grades 3-6).[61]

Children in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, which also serves students from Chesterfield Township, North Hanover Township and Springfield Township, along with children of United States Air Force personnel based at McGuire Air Force Base.[62][63] The schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[64]) are Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School[65] for grades 7 and 8 (720 students) and Northern Burlington County Regional High School[66] for grades 9-12 (1,186 students).[67] Both schools are in the Columbus section of Mansfield Township. Using a formula that reflects the population and the value of the assessed property in each of the constituent municipalities, taxpayers in Mansfield Township pay 46.5% of the district's tax levy, with the district's 2013-14 budget including $35.6 million in spending.[68]

Students from Mansfield Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[69]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 76.02 miles (122.34 km) of roadways, of which 37.12 miles (59.74 km) are maintained by the municipality, 18.42 miles (29.64 km) by Burlington County and 13.67 miles (22.00 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 6.81 miles (10.96 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[70]

Interstate 95 (the New Jersey Turnpike) stretches northwest for 3.1 miles (5.0 km) through the township, connecting Florence Township in the west to Chesterfield Township on the township's northern border.[71] Interchange 6 on the turnpike, which connects to the Pennsylvania Extension and Route 130, is located in the township. The Exit 6 tollgate is located further west on the Pennsylvania Extension in Florence Township.[72]

In 2004 plans were announced to widen the turnpike along the 25-mile (40 km) stretch of the Turnpike between Interchange 6 in Mansfield Township to Interchange 9 in East Brunswick Township in Middlesex County. Besides residents demanding sound barriers, this plan would add two new carriageways (to accommodate the outer roadways, or truck lanes) and ramp connections from the exit 7 toll station to the outer roadways, bringing the roadway up to 12 lanes of traffic in a 3-3-3-3 "dual-dual" configuration of separate truck and car lanes in each direction, with planned completion in 2014.[73]

Interstate 295 passes through the township as do U.S. Route 130, U.S. Route 206 and Route 68. county Route 543 also passes through.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service in the township between Trenton and Philadelphia on the 409 route.[74][75]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mansfield Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Clerk, Mansfield Township. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Mansfield, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mansfield township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mansfield township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 12, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Columbus, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mansfield, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Mansfield township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 22, 2013.
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 96. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  20. ^ About Mansfield Township, Mansfield Township. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed September 22, 2013.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 14, 2013.
  23. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 14, 2013.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 264, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 14, 2013. "Mansfield township in 1850 contained 2,953 inhabitants; in 1860, 2,777; and in 1870, 2,880. Columbus (formerly called Black Horse) and Georgetown, are in this township."
  25. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 14, 2013.
  26. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 14, 2013.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Mansfield township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 22, 2013.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mansfield township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 20, 2012.
  32. ^ Mansfield Township Committee Members. Mansfield Township. Accessed July 14, 2013.
  33. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Mansfield Township. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  34. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 11, 2012. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  35. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 18, 2011. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  36. ^ November 2, 2010 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, December 23, 2010. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  37. ^ Mulvaney, Nicole. "Mansfield Township homeowners challenge property revaluations", The Times (Trenton), August 16, 2013. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 23, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ a b c Staff. Board of Chosen Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  51. ^ Bruce Garganio, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  52. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  53. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  54. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  55. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  56. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed July 27, 2014.
  57. ^ Hefler, Jan. "Garganio again to head Burlco Freeholder Board", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 29, 2014. Accessed July 27, 2014. "The new director of the Burlington County Freeholder Board is Bruce Garganio, a Republican who led the five-member board for three years before he was defeated in his bid for reelection in November 2011.... Two weeks ago, the county Republican Committee tapped Garganio to fill the one-year vacancy that was created after Leah Arter resigned as freeholder director."
  58. ^ School Data for the Mansfield Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 22, 2013.
  59. ^ John Hydock Elementary School, Mansfield Public Schools. Accessed August 22, 2013.
  60. ^ Mansfield Township Elementary School, Mansfield Public Schools. Accessed August 22, 2013.
  61. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Mansfield Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  62. ^ Northern Burlington County Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 23, 2013. "The Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School and High School are located in Mansfield Township. Its constituent elementary districts are Chesterfield, Mansfield, North Hanover, and Springfield Townships. In addition, the district serves the children of United States Air Force personnel stationed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst."
  63. ^ Esposito, Martha. "Discover Burlington County 2013: Regional School Districts", Burlington County Times, March 14, 2012, Updated May 9, 2013. Accessed September 23, 2013. "NORTHERN BURLINGTON COUNTY REGIONAL - Serves: Chesterfield, Mansfield, North Hanover, Springfield"
  64. ^ School Data for the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  65. ^ Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School, Northern Burlington County Regional School District. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  66. ^ Northern Burlington County Regional High School, Northern Burlington County Regional School District. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  68. ^ Zimmaro, Mark. "Sharp tax increase included in Northern Burlington budget", Burlington County Times, April 8, 2013. Accessed September 23, 2013. "The $35.6 million budget represents a 2.7 percent increase from last year’s spending plan.... Tax rates in sending districts are determined using an state equalization formula that takes into account factors such as population and assessed values. Based on the formula, Chesterfield taxpayers fund 21.6 percent of Northern Burlington’s tax levy, Mansfield 46.5 percent, North Hanover 14.2 percent and Springfield 17.7 percent."
  69. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  70. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  71. ^ Interstate 95 / New Jersey Turnpike Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2001. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  72. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  73. ^ NJ Turnpike Interchange 6 to Widening program Overview, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed November 26, 2013. "The NJ Turnpike Interchange 6 to 9 Widening Program (Widening Program) consists of approximately 35 miles of road widening and associated interchange improvements from the vicinity of Interchange 6, in Mansfield Township, Burlington County (Milepost 48) to just south of Interchange 9 in East Brunswick Township, Middlesex County (Milepost 83)."
  74. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  75. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 26, 2013.
  76. ^ Oliver Cromwell, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 26, 2013. "Oliver Cromwell was a decorated black soldier who fought under George Washington in the War for Independence. He was born a freeman in Black Horse, present day Columbus in Mansfield Township, on May 24, 1752."
  77. ^ Tuscano, Joe. "Emotions High For Drewery", Observer-Reporter, November 9, 1984. Accessed November 26, 2013. "About 50 miles of New Jersey turnpike separate New Brunswick and Columbus. But it might just as well have been 500 miles as far as Willie Drewrey was concerned."
  78. ^ Eisenberg, Jamey. "Vikings won't pull surprise attack on Arizona", CBS Sports, March 21, 2009. Accessed March 22, 2012. "The best player is Cedric Jackson. He's a 6-feet-3 senior point guard from Columbus, N.J."
  79. ^ Mansfield Township, Delaware River Heritage Trail. Accessed November 26, 2013. "Henry Miller Shreve, the son of Israel Shreve, became a successful steamboat designer and entrepreneur. In 1826, as American began its westward expansion, he was appointed to the challenging post of U.S. Superintendent of Western River Improvements. Shreveport, Louisiana is named for him."
  80. ^ Tusim, Pearl J. History.php 1688 MANSFIELD TOWNSHIP, Mansfield Township. Accessed November 26, 2013. "Col. Israel Shreve - born in the Columbus ancestral home; home in Georgetown; his horse shot from under him four different times in Rev. War."
  81. ^ Jensen, Chris. Baseball State by State: Major and Negro League Players, Ballparks, Museums and Historical Sites, McFarland & Company, 2012. ISBN 9780786491285. Accessed November 26, 2013. "Eddie Smith (Mansfield) of the White Sox gave up the first hit to Joe DiMaggio when he started his 56-game hitting streak on May 15, 1941."

External links[edit]