Manuel Angelos Philanthropenos

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Manuel Angelos Philanthropenos (Greek: Μανουήλ Ἂγγελος Φιλανθρωπηνός) was a Byzantine Greek nobleman who ruled Thessaly from circa 1390 until it was conquered by the Ottoman Turks in 1393, as a Byzantine vassal with the title of Caesar.

Biography[edit]

Manuel was either the son or the brother of the Caesar Alexios Angelos Philanthropenos, who had ruled Thessaly since the early 1370s, succeeding him upon his death circa 1389/1390. Like Alexios, he recognized the suzerainty of the Byzantine emperor, and was given the title of Caesar in return.[1][2] In 1389, he (or Alexios, if he was still living) sent aid to the ruler of Ioannina, Esau de' Buondelmonti against the Albanian tribes of Epirus, and their joint forces scored a major victory over them.[3] In 1393, however, the Ottomans sent a large army which occupied Thessaly. Manuel was thus the last Christian ruler of the entire region until 1878, when it became part of the Kingdom of Greece.[4] Either he or (less likely) Alexios was the grandfather of the Serbian ruler Mihailo Anđelović and the Ottoman Grand Vizier Mahmud Pasha Angelović.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kazhdan 1991, pp. 1649, 2074.
  2. ^ Fine 1994, p. 353; Stavrides 2001, pp. 76–77.
  3. ^ Fine 1994, p. 355.
  4. ^ Fine 1994, pp. 353, 430.
  5. ^ Stavrides 2001, pp. 75–78.

Sources[edit]

Preceded by
Alexios Angelos Philanthropenos
Ruler of Thessaly
(under the Byzantine Empire)

ca. 1390–1393
Succeeded by
Ottoman conquest