Manuel Golmayo Torriente

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Manuel Golmayo y de la Torriente (12 June 1883, Havana, Cuba – 7 March 1973, Madrid) was a Cuban-Spanish chess master.

Born into a 'chess family' (father Celso Golmayo Zúpide, elder brother Celso Golmayo Torriente), he was Spanish Champion on numerous occasions (1902, 1912, 1919, 1921, 1927, 1928) and Sub-Champion in 1929/30 (he lost the title in a match (+1 –4 =2) to Ramón Rey Ardid.[1][2]

In 1922, he lost a mini match to Alexander Alekhine (+0 –1 =1) in Madrid.[3] In 1924, he took 8th in first unofficial Chess Olympiad (Championship Final) at Paris 1924 (Hermanis Matisons won).[4] In 1928, he took 4th in the Amateur World Championship in The Hague (Max Euwe won).[5]

He played for Spain in three official Chess Olympiads:

In tournaments, he took 6th at Barcelona 1929 (José Raúl Capablanca won),[7] took 7th at Sitges 1934 (Andor Lilienthal won),[8] took 3rd at Madrid 1934 (Torneo Gromer), took 4th at Paris 1938 (L'Echiquier, Baldur Hönlinger won),[9] tied for 9-10th at Barcelona 1946 (Miguel Najdorf won),[10] took 6th at Gijon 1948 (Antonio Rico won), tied for 8-9th at Almeria 1948,[11] and won both at Madrid 1947 and Linares 1951.[7]

In 1951, FIDE awarded Golmayo the title International Arbiter.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ (Spanish) Ajedrez
  2. ^ "Welcome to the Chessmetrics site". Chessmetrics.com. 2005-03-26. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  3. ^ "Alexander Alekhine: Sportive Biography". Alekhinechess.com. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  4. ^ "Chess Olympiad Paris 1924: championship final standings". OlimpBase. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  5. ^ "2nd Chess Olympiad The Hague 1928: Amateur World Championship". OlimpBase. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  6. ^ Wojciech Bartelski (2011-01-01). "the encyclopaedia of team chess". OlimpBase. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  7. ^ a b Santiago Pastrana. "Manuel Golmayo y de la Torriente (1883-1973)". Ajedrez.pastranec.net. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  8. ^ GER-ch 2nd Aachen 1934
  9. ^ Amsterdam (NED-ch10th) 1938
  10. ^ 1946
  11. ^ "Antonio Rico". Ajedrezastur.com. Retrieved 2012-01-01. 
  12. ^ Gaige, Jeremy (1987), Chess Personalia, A Biobibliography, McFarland, pp. 143–144, ISBN 0-7864-2353-6 

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Morán, Pablo (1974), Campeones y Campeonatos de España de Ajedrez, pp. 11–14 
  • Palacio, Carlos A. (1960), Ajedrez en Cuba, La Habana, p. 257