Manuel Gomes (football coach)

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Professor Neca
Personal information
Full name Manuel Gonçalves Gomes
Date of birth (1951-05-29) 29 May 1951 (age 63)
Place of birth Barcelos, Portugal
Playing position Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1975–1976 Parades (–)
1978–1980 Prado (–)
1980–1981 Limianos (–)
Teams managed
1979–1980 Prado
1981–1982 Valdevez
1982–1983 Aves
1984–1986 Aves
1986–1987 Fafe
1987–1988 Felgueiras
1988–1991 Tirsense
1991–1992 Vitória de Setúbal
1992 Famalicão
1992–1993 Paços Ferreira
1994 Braga
1994-1996 Benfica (assistant coach)
1996–1998 Angola
1998–2001 Aves
2001 Imortal
2001–2002 Penafiel
2002 Portugal (assistant coach)
2003 Hamilton thunder
2003–2005 Maldives
2005–2007 Aves
2007–2008 Al-Salmiya SC
2008 Gil Vicente
2009 Liga Muçulmana
2009–2010 Estoril
2010–2011 Ittihad FC
2011–2012 Churchill Brothers
2012 Trofense
2013 Aves
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Manuel Gonçalves Gomes (born 29 May 1951), commonly known as Professor Neca, is a Portuguese retired footballer who played as a midfielder and football manager.

Career[edit]

Playing career[edit]

His entire playing career saw him compete for several lower league league clubs between 1975 to 1981, in which he played for U.S.C. Paredes, G.D. Prado and AD Os Limianos. He began his coaching career in 1979 whilst at Prado where he had a player-coach role.[1]

Managerial career[edit]

His first ten years as manager saw him progress from the lower leagues to the top tier of Portuguese football. In the first phase of his managerial career, he managed C.A. Valdevez, C.D. Aves, A.D. Fafe, FC Felgueiras and F.C. Tirsense. Following his three year spell with Tirsense, his next few years of his managerial career would prove to be his most successful as he would go on to manage Vitória de Setúbal, F.C. Famalicão, F.C. Paços de Ferreira and S.C. Braga. His stay with Braga, would be short lived as he would only manage Braga for ten games where they narrowly avoided relegation in the 1993–94 season.[2]

In the summer of 1994, Neca was appointed as an assistant manager at S.L. Benfica by Artur Jorge for the 1994–95 season. Benfica's season proved to be a disappointing one as they finished behind FC Porto and Sporting CP.[3] Despite Artur Jorge's departure mid way through the 1995–96 season, Neca would remain with Benfica under the management of Mário Wilson. Benfica would go onto to finish second in the league behind Porto and also capture the Taça de Portugal.[4][5]

In 1996, he left his assistant managerial role at Benfica and accepted an offer by the Federação Angolana de Futebol to coach the Angolan national team. As manager of Angola, he guided the team to the 1998 African Cup of Nations. Angola was drawn against Côte d'Ivoire, Namibia and South Africa. Angola would exit the tournament in the first round of the competition, following a third place finish in the group phase after two draws and one loss.[6]

He departed the Angolan national side following the African Cup of Nations where he would go on to manage several different sides in Portugal and abroad of which included C.D. Aves, Imortal DC and F.C. Penafiel.[7] In 2003, Neca accepted an invitation to coach the Maldivian national team. His spell would be unsuccessful after he failed to guide the side to the 2004 AFC Asian Cup.

After a year in charge he would leave the national side and would return to Portugal to manage Aves for the fourth time in his career. In his fourth spell in charge, he guided the side to a second place finish in the 2005–06 Liga de Honra thus gaining promotion to the Primeira Liga. His next season proved to be a very difficult one as Aves finished bottom of the 2006–07 Primeira Liga with only twenty two points.[8] Neca left the club following their relegation. The next three seasons would see him manage four different clubs among those included Al-Salmiya SC, Gil Vicente, Liga Muçulmana and G.D. Estoril Praia.[9]

In June 2011, he signed a deal to coach I-League side Churchill Brothers S.C..[10] His start as manager of Churchill Brothers proved to be successful as they captured the 2011 Durand Cup for the third team in their history in October 2011.[11] In February 2012, following a dip in form where the club fell into fifth place, Neca was sacked as manager. He would later be replaced by Brazilian coach Carlos Roberto Pereira. In July 2012, he returned to Portugal to manage C.D. Trofense of the Liga de Honra.[12] In December 2012, after one win in eight games, Neca was sacked as manager where he left the club in nineteenth place in the league.[13]

In February 2013, he became the new manager of Desportivo das Aves until the end of the season.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Neca ForaDeJogo Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  2. ^ Portuguese League 1993/94 ZeroZero Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  3. ^ Portuguese League 1994/95 ZeroZero Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  4. ^ Liga Portuguesa 1995/96 ZeroZero Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  5. ^ Benfica 3-1 Sporting ZeroZero Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  6. ^ CAN 1998 ZeroZero Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  7. ^ Professor Neca substitui Manuel Correia no Penafiel (Professor Neca substitutes Manuel Correia at Penafiel) Record Date:22 October 2001 Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  8. ^ bwin LIGA 2006/2007 ZeroZero Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  9. ^ Neca deixa o clube (Neca leaves the club) Record Date: 17 November 2008 Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  10. ^ Neca vai treinar na Índia (Neca is going to manage in India) Record Date: 17 November 2008 Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  11. ^ Churchill win Durand Cup via tie-breaker The Times of India Date: 15 October 2011 Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  12. ^ Neca é o novo treinador (Neca is the new manager) Record Date: 21 July 2012 Retrieved: 20 December 2012.
  13. ^ "Neca despedido" [Neca sacked]. A Bola. 6 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  14. ^ "Professor Neca é o novo técnico" [Professor Neca is the new manager]. Record. 18 February 2013. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 

External links[edit]