Maple sugar

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Maple sugar
Maple sugar cubes.jpg
Ziiga'igaans (maple sugar cubes) being made in a ziiga'iganaatig (sugar press-mould)
Type Confectionery
Place of origin Canada and the United States
Main ingredients Sap of the sugar maple tree
Cookbook:Maple sugar  Maple sugar
Golden sugar maple tree

Maple sugar is a traditional sweetener in Canada, and the northeastern United States, prepared from the sap of the sugar maple tree.

Preparation[edit]

Maple sugar is what remains after the sap of the sugar maple is boiled for longer than is needed to create maple syrup or maple taffy.[1] Once almost all the water has been boiled off, all that is left is a solid sugar.[2] By composition, this sugar is about 90% sucrose, the remainder consisting of variable amounts of glucose and fructose.[3] This is usually sold in pressed blocks or as a translucent candy.[4] It is difficult to create as the sugar easily burns and thus requires considerable skill.[5]

History[edit]

Maple sugar was the preferred form of maple by First Nations/Native American peoples as the sugar could easily be transported and lasted a long time. It is called ziinzibaakwad by the Anishinaabeg.[6] [7] Blessing of the Bay, the second ocean-going merchant ship built in the English colonies, carried maple sugar from the Massachusetts Bay Colony to New Amsterdam as early as 1631.[8]

Uses[edit]

It is today used to flavor some maple products and can be used as an alternative to cane sugar. Maple sugar is about twice as sweet as standard granulated sugar.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]