Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

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Miami Project to Cure Paralysis
Founded 1985
Founder Nick Buoniconti & Barth A. Green, M.D.
Type medical
Focus spinal cord injury & tramatic brain injury
Location
Coordinates 25°47′18.74″N 80°12′44.57″W / 25.7885389°N 80.2123806°W / 25.7885389; -80.2123806Coordinates: 25°47′18.74″N 80°12′44.57″W / 25.7885389°N 80.2123806°W / 25.7885389; -80.2123806
Owner University of Miami
Key people Marc A. Buoniconti, President
W. Dalton Dietrich, Ph.D.,Scientific Director
Suzanne M. Sayfie, Executive Director
Diana C. Berning, Administrative Director[1]
Revenue $23 million[2]
Employees 250[3]
Mission research and treatment of paralysis
Website www.themiamiproject.org


The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis is a spinal cord injury research center and a designated Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. It was co-founded in 1985 by Barth A. Green, M.D. and NFL Hall of Fame linebacker Nick Buoniconti after Buoniconti's son, Marc, sustained a spinal cord injury during a college football game. Today, The Miami Project’s international team is housed in the Lois Pope LIFE Center and includes more than 250 scientists, researchers and clinicians.

Clinical Trials[edit]

In July 2012, The Miami Project was granted approval by the FDA to proceed with a Schwann cell implantation clinical trial. In November 2012, doctors from the University of Miami implanted the first patient with his own Schwann cells, initiating phase 1 of the trial, a test of the safety and efficacy of the technique.[4]

The Buoniconti Fund[edit]

The Buoniconti family established The Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis in 1992, a non-profit organization devoted to assisting The Miami Project.

Lois Pope LIFE Center[edit]

The Center is located in the Schoninger research quadrangle at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center. It was named in honor of Lois Pope, who donated $10 million toward its construction, and of her charity Leaders in Furthering Education (LIFE). The building opened on October 26, 2000. Pope's gift also funds 20 LIFE Fellows for neurological research.[5][6] The six-story 180,000 sq ft (17,000 m2) building cost $28 million and was designed by MGE Architects.[7] The block of NW 11th Avenue in front of the building has been named Buoniconti Drive.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Management and Faculty". Univ. of Miami. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  2. ^ "Message from the President". Univ. of Miami. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  3. ^ "Message from the Chairman". Univ. of Miami. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  4. ^ "Clinical Trials Initiative Update". Retrieved 30 May 2013. 
  5. ^ "The Lois Pope LIFE Center Will Be Top Neurological Research Facility In The World". LIFE. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  6. ^ "Lois Pope LIFE Center". Univ. of Miami. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  7. ^ "Lois Pope Life Center". Total Systems Commissioning, Inc. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 
  8. ^ "Maps and Directions". Univ. of Miami. Retrieved 2011-01-18. 

External links[edit]