Marc Edwards (American football)

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For other people named Mark Edwards, see Mark Edwards (disambiguation).
Marc Edwards
No. 44, 49
Fullback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1974-11-17) November 17, 1974 (age 39)
Place of birth: Cincinnati, Ohio
Height: 6 ft 0 in (183 cm) Weight: 249 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school: Norwood (OH)
College: Notre Dame
NFL Draft: 1997 / Round: 2 / Pick: 55
Debuted in 1997 for the San Francisco 49ers
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com
Stats at DatabaseFootball.com

Marc Alexander Edwards (born November 17, 1974) is a former professional American football player who last played in the NFL in 2005 for the Chicago Bears.

Edwards was named Ohio's Mr. Football in 1992 as the state's top player. He played college football at Notre Dame. Following his team's upset win over the #5-ranked University of Southern California Trojans on October 21, 1995, Edwards became the second Fighting Irish player ever to be carried off the field by his teammates; the first was Daniel E. "Rudy" Ruettiger in 1975. Edwards's senior year he was picked as a team captain at Notre Dame.[1]

Edwards was selected by the San Francisco 49ers in the second round (55th overall) of the 1997 NFL Draft. After two years in San Francisco, Edwards played the following two years for the Cleveland Browns from 1999 to 2000. He has also played for the New England Patriots from 2001 to 2002 and the Jacksonville Jaguars from 2003 to 2004. Edwards's high school retired his #44 Jersey on September 11, 2010. In October 2010, a book by Aaron M. Smith about Edwards's life, Odyssey: From Blue Collar, Ohio To Super Bowl Champion, was published.

Edwards attended Norwood High School in Norwood, Ohio, and played starting middle linebacker on the school's football team alongside Robert Bales, whom he replaced as the team's starting middle linebacker as a freshman star.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Weiss, Dick. (October 22, 1995). Slighting Irish Hurts Alleged USC Taunts Inspire Notre Dame. New York Daily News.
  2. ^ "At Home, Asking How ‘Our Bobby’ Became War Crime Suspect". New York Times. March 19, 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-19.