Marc Geiger

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Marc Geiger
Born Marc Paul Geiger
(1962-10-11) October 11, 1962 (age 51)
Englewood, New Jersey
Residence Los Angeles, CA
Nationality American
Citizenship American
Alma mater University of California, San Diego
Occupation Booking Agent, Entrepreneur
Years active 1980–present
Employer William Morris Endeavor
Board member of
Board of advisors, Topspin Media
Website
wma.com

Marc Geiger is an American music executive, talent agent, and entrepreneur. He co-founded Lollapalooza and ARTISTdirect, and is the current head of William Morris Endeavor's music division.[1][2][3][4][5]

Biography[edit]

Geiger was born in Englewood, New Jersey, and grew up in Stamford, Connecticut. He moved with his family to Palo Alto, California after his father, a Budapest, Hungary-born Holocaust survivor, accepted a job as a satellite communication engineer in Silicon Valley. [6] [7] When Geiger graduated from high school, he enrolled at the University of California San Diego; while a student, he started a co-operative record store called "Assorted Vinyl," selling 12-inch dance remixes from bands like Echo & the Bunnymen and Japan, while also running the Student Events Committee. After promoting a series of concerts on campus, Geiger started his own concert promotion company, That Kid Presents.[7][8]

After booking King Crimson, B.B. King and Ian Hunter, amongst others, at UCSD, Geiger began working for San Diego promoter, Mark Berman Attractions/Avalon Attractions. While there, Geiger promoted hundreds of shows in San Diego, and founded and launched Humphrey's By The Bay, a popular local venue.[9] Additionally, Geiger dj'd at 91X, a groundbreaking alternative radio station.[10]

With a degree in Management Science and Biology, Geiger moved to Los Angeles after college and began working as a booking agent for Regency Artists, developing their alternative music division. (Regency merged into and became the hugely successful Triad Artists Agency, and was later folded into the William Morris Agency.)[11][12] Geiger spent 7 years at Triad, booking such artists as the Pixies, the Smiths, the Cocteau Twins, New Order, and Jane's Addiction. He would go on to create the Lollapalooza Festival with Jane's Perry Farrell and veteran agent Don Muller.[5][13] In its inaugural year, 1991, Lollapalooza triumphed at the box office, and also "revolutionized the concert industry, ushered in the alternative rock format,and galvanized a previously marginalized generation of outsiders."[14]

In 1991, Geiger left Triad to join Rick Rubin's American Recordings as Executive Vice President of A&R, Marketing and New Media.[15] During his tenure at American, Rubin and Geiger bought UBL.com, one of the first online music directories, from a Caltech student. Geiger left American Recordings in 1996 to create ARTISTdirect with Muller; the company launched in January 1997 with the premise that "the Internet was going to radically reshape the music business, both from a distribution perspective as well as create new revenue streams that hadn't existed before."[16][17]

Geiger served as CEO and then Vice Chairman of ARTISTdirect until 2003. Under his auspices, ARTISTdirect signed more than 130 top recording artists to e-commerce agreements,[18] and became one of the most highly trafficked music sites on the Web. ARTISTdirect also included a booking agency and two record labels.[19][3][4][20]

ARTISTdirect is credited as the first internet company designed to create a direct connection between musicians and fans, and was additionally noted for web development, e-commerce, and digital fan management.[21][22]The company went public in March 2000, one week prior to the stock market crash of 2000.[23]

Geiger left ARTISTdirect in 2003 to join The William Morris Agency as a Senior Vice President in the music division. After William Morris merged with Endeavor to become WME, Geiger was named the head of the music division, overseeing the agency's worldwide music business.[24] In his capacity at WME, Geiger is the agent for David Byrne, The Flaming Lips, Jack White, Lady Gaga, Nine Inch Nails, Ozzy Osbourne, Black Sabbath, Steve Martin, Tony Bennett, Pixies, Roger Waters, and Trent Reznor, among many others.[25]

Geiger rose from #21 in Billboard's Power 100 of 2012[3] to #9 in their 2013 rankings.[4] He has also won numerous Pollstar Awards, including three for Agent of the Year,[26] and is on the Board of Advisors for Topspin Media.[27] He delivered the keynote address at MIDEM in 2014. [28]

Selected awards and acknowledgements[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zwickel, Jonathan. "An Oral History of Lollapalooza". May 17, 2011. Spin. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  2. ^ "Corporate Profile, videogameslive.com". Video Games Live. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c Gallo, Phil. "2012 Billboard Power 100 (#21)". January 26, 2012. Billboard. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c Waddell, Ray (February 3, 2013). "2013 Billboard Power 100: Marc Geiger (#9)". Billboard. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Matzer, Marla (29 January 1997). "This Musical Trio Has Put A New Spin On The Record Business". January 29, 1997 (Los Angeles Times). Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  6. ^ "Steven Thomas Geiger". Palo Alto Online. Palo Alto Weekly/Embarcadero Publishing. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Welch, Matt. "The Quiet Revolutionary". October, 1999. The Zone. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  8. ^ Varga, George. "Marc Geiger is a global musical force". February 15, 2014. San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  9. ^ Varga, George. "Humphrey's Celebrates Thirty Years". April 3, 2011. San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  10. ^ Varga, George. "Bay Watchable". March 26, 2006. San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  11. ^ Eller, Claudia. "Morris Agency Engulfs Triad". October 19, 1992 (Variety). Retrieved 20 March 2013. 
  12. ^ "Digital Hollywood Conference". DIgital Hollywood. Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  13. ^ Reynolds, Simon (4 August 1991). "A Woodstock For The Lost Generation". August 4, 1991 (New York Times). Retrieved 10 March 2013. 
  14. ^ Gunderson, Edna (3 August 2011). "Lollapalooza Turns 20, Loudly". August 3, 2011 (USA Today). Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  15. ^ Hilburn, Robert (10 May 1992). "The King of Radical Pop". May 10, 1992 (Los Angeles Times). Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  16. ^ "Media Analysis: Marc Geiger". July 23, 2001. The Wall Street Transcript. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  17. ^ Himmelsbach, Eric. "From Lollapalooza to IPO". February 23, 2000. LA Weekly. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  18. ^ "Digital Entertainment Awards". June, 2004. Digital Entertainment Awards. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  19. ^ Anderson, Lessley. "Beastie Boys In Charge With New Music Site". August 10, 1998 (CNN). 
  20. ^ Droney, Maureen. "Mix Online: New Media". January 1, 2003. Mix Online. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  21. ^ "Media Analysis: Marc Geiger". July 23, 2001. The Wall Street Transcript. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  22. ^ Himmelsbach, Eric. "From Lollapalooza to IPO". February 23, 2000. LA Weekly. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  23. ^ Beattie, Andrew. "Market Crashes: The Dotcom Crash". Investopedia. Retrieved 20 March 2013. 
  24. ^ Finke, Nikki. "William Morris Agents Expands Board To Include Younger Agents and More Muisc". June 20, 2008. Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 20 March 2013. 
  25. ^ "MEIEA Bio: Marc Geiger". February 2013. MEIEA. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  26. ^ "Pollstar Pro: Awards Archives". Pollstar Pro. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  27. ^ "Business Directory". Inside View Technologies. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  28. ^ Smirke, Richard. "WME’S Marc Geiger Stresses Streaming in Vision of $100B Recorded Music Industry at MIDEM". February 3, 2014. Billboard. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  29. ^ "2014 Power 100". January 2014. Billboard. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  30. ^ "Billboard Power 100 2013". February 2013. Billboard. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  31. ^ "Billboard Power 100 2012". February 2012. Billboard. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  32. ^ "Agenda". May 2013. International Music Summit. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  33. ^ "Agent of the Year". 2007. Pollstar. Retrieved 9 March 2014. 
  34. ^ "Pollstar Pro: Awards Archives". Pollstar Pro. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  35. ^ "Agent of the Year". 2010. Pollstar. Retrieved 9 March 2014.