Marching In

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"Marching In"
Author Isaac Asimov
Country United States
Language English
Genre(s) Science fiction short story
Published in High Fidelity
Publication type Periodical
Publisher ABC Consumer Magazines
Media type Print (Magazine, Hardback & Paperback)
Publication date May 1976[1]

"Marching In" is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. The story was written at the request of the US publication High Fidelity, with the stipulation that it be 2,500 words long, set about twenty-five years in the future and deal with some aspect of sound recording.[2]

Plot summary[edit]

In the year 2001, Jerome Bishop, a jazz composer and trombonist, is asked by Dr. Cray to assist in a project at a mental hospital, lending his musical knowledge to an experimental treatment of depression.

Although initially doubtful that he has anything to offer, he agrees to work on it and returns a few days later. He suggests to Dr. Cray that the irresistible rhythm of a revival hymn can snap anyone out of depression and demonstrates this by humming the opening beat of "When the Saints Go Marching In", which makes the patient feel much better and even gets Dr. Cray's toes tapping.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Asimov, Isaac (1980) In Joy Still Felt, Avon Books, p. 721
  2. ^ Asimov, Isaac: The Bicentennial Man and Other Stories, pages 172-173. Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1976.