Marcia Kramer

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Marcia Kramer (born December 30, 1948) is the chief political correspondent for WCBS-TV (CBS 2) in New York City. Kramer has collected many awards for her electronic journalism at the station and at the New York Daily News newspaper. The awards include two George Foster Peabody awards, two Edward R. Murrow awards, eight Emmy awards, two New York Press Club Golden Typewriter awards and a first-place award from the Associated Press for her investigative reporting. [WCBS-TV web bio]. At the Daily News, she was a staff reporter before she was appointed the paper's first woman bureau chief in City Hall and Albany.

Kramer joined WCBS-TV in 1990 during a labor disruption at the tabloid. Her broadcast career includes many years serving as host of the station's Sunday morning political show - "Sunday Edition with Marcia Kramer." The show featured interviews with local and national politicians as well as round-table discussions with fellow reporters and editors. In 1996, she married Marc Kalech, who was Managing Editor of the New York Post.

During the 1992 New York presidential primary, she asked then-candidate Bill Clinton the question about his past marijuana use which prompted his response that he had smoked the drug while in college "but did not inhale."[1]

In October 2000, during a New York State Senate debate, Kramer asked candidates Hillary Clinton and Rick Lazio what they thought of "Federal Bill 602-P." Kramer described the bill as a proposal to implement a tax on internet email messages. As part of a promotion by the station, the question had been sent in by a listener but the screeners reviewing the questions, Kramer and the candidates were all unaware that the "tax" was actually an internet hoax. The station quickly issued a statement correcting the error.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kolbert, Elizabeth (March 31, 1992). "THE 1992 CAMPAIGN: Media; As Entertainment, This Campaign Is Not So Bad". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-11-27. 
  2. ^ Archibold, Randal C. (October 9, 2000). "Both Oppose E-Mail Tax Bill (Good, Because It Doesn't Exist)". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-11-27. 

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/item_IIxQtw6qcFkK953pqxdqyN

http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/2000/10/09/2000-10-09_senate_debate_not_foolproof.html[dead link] http://www.wnd.com/index.php?pageId=14416

External links[edit]