Marco Apicella

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Marco Apicella
Born (1965-10-07) 7 October 1965 (age 48)
Formula One World Championship career
Nationality Italy Italian
Active years 1993
Teams Jordan
Races 1
Championships 0
Wins 0
Podiums 0
Career points 0
Pole positions 0
Fastest laps 0
First race 1993 Italian Grand Prix
Last race 1993 Italian Grand Prix
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Participating years 1995, 1999, 2006-2007, 2009
Teams SARD Co. Ltd., Riley & Scott Europe, JLOC Isao Noritake
Best finish 14 (1995)
Class wins 0

Marco Apicella (born October 7, 1965 near Bologna) is an Italian racing driver. He competed in only one Formula One Grand Prix for the Jordan team in the 1993 Italian Grand Prix. He was involved in a crash at the first corner and holds the record for shortest race distance covered in a Formula One career (800 meters (2,600 ft)).[1]

Career[edit]

International Formula 3000[edit]

Apicella's first season in International Formula 3000, 1987, was uncompetitive in the EuroVenturini Dallara car, only scoring one point thanks to a fifth place at the Spa-Francorchamps circuit.[2] During the same year, he tested the Minardi Formula One car at the Autódromo do Estoril circuit.[3] Apicella moved to the FIRST team for the 1988 season and was a title favourite for the season. The team underperformed, but in 1989, again with FIRST, Apicella achieved several podium finishes on his way to finishing fourth overall in the Drivers' Championship. Apicella looked like a championship contender for the 1990 season and continued with the FIRST team, but his performances worsened as the season progressed, ending with a disqualification in the Brands Hatch round.[4] Despite a poor 1990 season, Apicella had the chance to test drive with the Modena and Minardi teams. Late in the year, he went to Japan and did some tests for Bridgestone in a Reynard-Mugen Formula One prototype car.[3] Apicella chose to change teams for the 1991 season, moving to Paul Stewart Racing, teaming up with Stewart himself. He was classified fifth overall at the end of the season.[3]

Japanese Formula 3000 (1992–1993)[edit]

With no offers for a drive in International F3000 for 1992, Apicella went to Japan to drive in the Japanese Formula 3000 series, setting up a relationship with the Dome team. Apicella, driving the Dome F103 won the fifth round of the championship that year. He continued to improve, finishing fourth in the 1993 season, winning at the Sugo race circuit.[2]

Formula One[edit]

Apicella's good performances in Japan during 1992 and early-1993 gave him a drive at the Jordan Formula One team for his home race in the 1993 season, with team boss Eddie Jordan wanting to try out up-and-coming Formula 3000 drivers.[5] He qualified in 23rd position, but retired on the first corner of the first lap of the race after a multi-car collision.[3] He was replaced by Emanuele Naspetti for the following round in Portugal.[5] As a result of this, he is sometimes considered to have had the shortest Formula 1 career out of any driver.[6]

Japanese Formula 3000/Formula Nippon (1994–1996)[edit]

For 1994, Apicella continued with Dome in Japanese Formula 3000, winning at the Mine, Suzuka and Fuji circuits on his way to winning the title. He continued in Japanese F3000 for 1995 and 1996 (the series being renamed Formula Nippon for 1996), this time with Team 5Zigen, but his activities were limited, as he chose to do other motor sport activities such as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.[2]

Apicella was appointed Chief Test Driver with Dome for 1996, testing the Dome F105 car alongside Shinji Nakano and Katsumi Yamamoto from April to June 1996 at the Suzuka Circuit.[2][7] The aim was for the car to produce a base for them to mount a challenge into Formula One, but the project was shelved after the car was substantially damaged in an accident.[2]

Apicella's last season in the Formula Nippon series was in 1997, driving for the Stellar International team. His best result for the team was a fourth place at the Mine circuit.[2]

Other series (1999-present)[edit]

Apicella moved back to Italy for 1999, competing in the Italian Formula 3000 championship. He scored two wins during the season on his way to third place in the championship. Apicella also tried to qualify for the Spa round of the International Formula 3000 championship in 1999 for Monaco Motorsport, but failed to do so due to adverse weather conditions. Apicella has since gone back to Japan, to compete in touring cars with the All Japan GT Championship.[2]

Apicella has also competed in several 24 Hours of Le Mans races. He was scheduled to compete in the 2007 event with the JLOC Isao Noritake team, but on the first day of practice he was involved in an accident on the Mulsanne straight, which heavily damaged his Lamborghini Murciélago car.[8] Apicella is competing in the 2009 event again with the JLOC team.[9]

Racing record[edit]

Complete International Formula 3000 results[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap.)

Year Entrant 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 DC Points
1987 EuroVenturini SIL
15
VAL
Ret
SPA
5
PAU
Ret
DON
7
PER
Ret
BRH
DNQ
BIR
13
IMO
13
BUG
15
JAR
7
19th 1
1988 First Racing JER
13
VAL
7
PAU
5
SIL
6
MNZ
2
PER
Ret
BRH
Ret
BIR
Ret
BUG
Ret
ZOL
Ret
DIJ
Ret
11th 9
1989 First Racing SIL
8
VAL
Ret
PAU
2
JER
3
PER
4
BRH
Ret
BIR
2
SPA
3
BUG
Ret
DIJ
Ret
4th 23
1990 First Racing DON
13
SIL
3
PAU
Ret
JER
2
MNZ
5
PER
Ret
HOC
2
BRH
DSQ
BIR
Ret
BUG
Ret
NOG
5
6th 20
1991 Paul Stewart Racing VAL
Ret
PAU
4
JER
Ret
MUG
2
PER
2
HOC
Ret
BRH
4
SPA
Ret
BUG
Ret
NOG
11
5th 18
1999 Monaco Motorsport IMO MON CAT MAG SIL A1R HOC HUN SPA
DNQ
NÜR NC 0

Complete Formula One results[edit]

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 WDC Points
1993 Sasol Jordan Jordan 193 Hart V10 RSA
BRA
EUR
SMR
ESP
MON
CAN
FRA
GBR
GER
HUN
BEL
ITA
Ret
POR
JPN
AUS
NC 0

24 Hours of Le Mans results[edit]

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1995 Japan SARD Co. Ltd. United States Jeff Krosnoff
Italy Mauro Martini
Toyota Supra LM GT1 264 14th 6th
1999 France Riley & Scott Europe
France Solution F
Sweden Carl Rosenblad
United States Shane Lewis
Riley & Scott Mk III/2-Ford LMP 67 DNF DNF
2006 Japan JLOC Isao Noritake Japan Koji Yamanishi
Japan Yasutaka Hinoi
Lamborghini Murciélago R-GT GT1 283 DNF DNF
2009 Japan JLOC Japan Atsushi Yogo
Japan Yutaka Yamagishi
Lamborghini Murciélago R-GT GT1 1 DNF DNF

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Courses for horses, winners and steering wheels". ESPN. 18 February 2010. Retrieved 23 November 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Nyberg, Rainer. "A stillborn GP project from Japan". 8W. Forix / Autosport. Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Drivers: Marco Apicella". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  4. ^ Diepraam, Mattijs (August 2000). "From zero to FIRST". 8W. Forix / Autosport. Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  5. ^ a b Diepraam, Mattijs (May 1998). "Marco Apicella's few yards as a Grand Prix driver". 8W. Forix / Autosport. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  6. ^ Marco Apicella, F1 rejects, 8 August 2001.
  7. ^ "Dome to launch next week". GrandPrix.com. Inside F1. 1996-03-11. Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  8. ^ Freeman, Glenn (2007-06-13). "Audi's Biela fastest in qualifying 1". Autosport. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  9. ^ "List of the Competitors and Cars Invited to the Administrative Checking & Scrutineering" (PDF). Automobile Club de l'Ouest. 2009-06-09. Retrieved 2009-06-09. [dead link]
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Kazuyoshi Hoshino
Japanese Formula 3000
Champion

1994
Succeeded by
Toshio Suzuki