Marco Borriello

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Marco Borriello
Marco Borriello.jpg
Borriello playing for Genoa in 2008
Personal information
Full name Marco Borriello[1]
Date of birth (1982-06-18) 18 June 1982 (age 32)
Place of birth Naples, Italy
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Roma
Number 9
Youth career
1996–2001 Milan
1999–2001 Treviso (loan)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2001–2007 Milan 16 (1)
2001 Triestina (loan) 9 (1)
2001–2002 Treviso (loan) 27 (10)
2003 Empoli (loan) 12 (1)
2004–2005 Reggina (loan) 30 (2)
2005–2006 Sampdoria (loan) 11 (2)
2006 → Treviso (loan) 20 (5)
2007–2008 Genoa 35 (19)
2008–2010 Milan 37 (15)
2010– Roma 52 (12)
2012 Juventus (loan) 13 (2)
2012–2013 → Genoa (loan) 28 (12)
2014 West Ham United (loan) 2 (0)
National team
2001–2002 Italy U20[2] 3 (1)
2002–2003 Italy U21[2] 12 (6)
2008–2011 Italy[2] 7 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 20:59, 12 May 2014 (UTC).

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 9 February 2011

Marco Borriello (born 18 June 1982) is an Italian footballer who plays as a striker for Roma. He has previously played for other Italian clubs, including Milan, Sampdoria, Treviso, Reggina, Empoli, Triestina, and Juventus and for West Ham United.

Club career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Borriello came up through the ranks of Milan but was transferred to Treviso on loan before having the chance to prove himself at the first team. He scored 8 goals for Treviso reserve in 2000–01 season.[3] After another move ca. January 2001, he made his professional debut for Triestina in 2000–01 Serie C2 (the fourth division), subsequently returning to Treviso in June 2001, via Milan.[4] His 10 goals in 27 Serie C1 games with Treviso led to Milan's recalling him in June 2002.

Milan[edit]

Borriello made his Serie A debut for A.C. Milan on 21 September 2002 against Perugia but failed to establish himself and spent much of the next few years on loan at other Serie A clubs.

After only 3 appearances for Milan, he went on to shine for league rival Empoli for the rest of the 2002–03 Serie A season. He returned to Milan for the 2003–04 season but played in just 4 games. In the 2004–05 season, he was on loan to Reggina.[5] In the 2005–06 season he was once again sent on loan, this time to Sampdoria along with Milan teammates Samuele Dalla Bona and Ignazio Abate. Borriello left Sampdoria in January 2006 for a six-month loan stint at Treviso where he scored his then-career best of 5 Serie A goals.[6] Treviso were relegated that season.

Borriello was recalled to the Milan first team in the summer of 2006 after Milan sold star striker Andriy Shevchenko to Chelsea and Marcio Amoroso was released from the club. However, his future was put in jeopardy when on 21 December 2006 while serving his first full Milan season. He tested positive in a drug test for prednisolone and prednisone after the 11th match of the 2006/2007 Serie A season. After confirmation of the test results in January 2007, he was suspended until 21 March 2007.[7] Borriello later admitted he had taken the substances to treat an STD he had caught from his girlfriend at the time.[8]

Genoa[edit]

On 21 June 2007, Borriello was sold to Genoa in a co-ownership deal with Milan, for €1.8 million.[9] Borriello helped newly promoted Genoa get their first win of the season, scoring his first hat-trick at the expense of Udinese. The game ended 3–2, with the striker scoring from the penalty spot in the 76th minute. Incidentally, in the return fixture on 24 February 2008 in Udine, Borriello hit another hat-trick in a 5–3 away win, reaching 15 league goals in the process. He finished the season with 19. This mark made him third in the league behind Juventus pair Alessandro Del Piero and David Trézéguet.

Return to Milan[edit]

Borriello (number shirt 22) clashed with Arsenal's Kieran Gibbs.

Following the sale of Alberto Gilardino to Fiorentina, it was confirmed on 29 May 2008 that Borriello would return to Milan as his replacement. The deal included the move of Davide Di Gennaro to Genoa under a co-ownership deal for €2.5 million,[10] in addition to a €7.5 million fee.[11][12] (However Di Gennaro was devalued to €1.25 million when he returned to Milan a year later, which made the return of Borriello had cost Milan €8.75 million).

Shortly before the signing of Ronaldinho by Milan, Borriello's agent claimed his client might look for playing time at a different club if the club bought another striker. However, the signing of Ronaldinho was not seen as a threat to Borriello's position, as the Brazilian played normally as a supporting striker or an attacking midfielder.

2008–09 season[edit]

In Borriello's first season of his second spell at Milan, he made just 7 Serie A appearances scoring just 1 goal, which came against Reggina. He also scored against F.C. Zurich in the UEFA Cup, but an unfortunate injury kept him out of action for the rest of the season. After Kaká left the club in the summer 2009 transfer window, Borriello chose to switch to shirt number 22, which he had worn at Genoa.

2009–10 season[edit]

After a disappointing first season, Borriello scored his first ever brace for the Rossoneri in their 2–0 win over Parma on 1 November 2009. On 25 November, Borriello scored his first Champions League goal against Marseille in a match that finished 1–1. Borriello scored another brace in Milan's 5–2 defeat of former club Genoa, one of his goals being an acrobatic bicycle kick from a cross from Ronaldinho. The following week Borriello scored a lovely goal against A.C. Siena, when he hooked a 30-yard chipped pass from Andrea Pirlo into the top corner of the net. On 21 February 2010, Borriello scored his fourth volley of the season in Milan's 2–0 win over Bari. On 11 April, he scored two second half goals to help Milan come from 2–0 down to draw against Catania Calcio. Borriello finished the season with 14 league goals in 26 appearances.

Roma[edit]

2010–11 season[edit]

He started the first game of the season for Milan against U.S. Lecce. On 31 August 2010, he was loaned to Roma for free (where he then scored the winning goal against Milan at the San Siro on 19 December),[13] with the obligation to purchase the player's rights before the 2011–2012 season for a total of €10 million split over 3 years (a general practice in Italy), as a direct consequence of the arrival of Zlatan Ibrahimović and Robinho. Borriello signed a 1+4-year contract; in the first year he would earn €4.5 million (in gross/pre-tax salary, excluded bonuses), an amount increasing to €5.4million in the following years.[14] His agent revealed that he almost joined English side Manchester City, but joined Roma, thanks to conviction and passion from Rosella Sensi,Roma's chairwoman.[15]

He made his Roma debut, on 11 September 2010, as Roma lost 5-1 loss against Cagliari.[16] In back to back matches on 19 and 22 of September 2010, He scored against Bologna and Brescia. A week later, on 28 September 2010, in the Champions League, he scored his first goal in the Champions League, in a 2-1 win over Cluj. This followed up, on 19 October 2010, in a 3-1 loss against Basel. His third came when he scored the first goal for Roma in a match before winning a penalty, allowing Totti to score a winner. He scored his fourth European goal, on the final game of the Group Stage, as Roma settled a draw with Cluj. In Derby della Capitale, Borriello scored the opener in the second half as Roma win 2-0[17] and scored again from the penalty, on 19 January 2011, in the round of 16 Coppa Italia, which Roma won 2-1 once more.

Borriello finished with 17 goals (in all competitions) for Roma in 2010–11 season, making him a second top scorer behind Francesco Totti.

2011–12 season[edit]

With the arrival of new coach Luis Enrique, Borriello came to be considered surplus to the team's needs.[18] He spent the first half of the season on the bench, playing just 7 matches, of which he started in only 2.

Juventus[edit]

Borriello was signed by Juventus on January 2012 on a half-season loan from Roma for €500,000, with the option to buy him for €8 million at the end of the season.[19] Borriello also received a leaving incentive of €275,000 from Roma, which de facto came from the loan income that Juventus paid. After his official unveiling as a Juventus player to Italian press, Borriello met with a hostile reception from Juventus fans. This was due to him moving to Roma, rather than to Juventus two years previous.[20]

He scored his first Juventus goal in a win against Cesena on 25 April. After scoring his first goal, Borriello says his goal was dedicated to Andrea Fortunato, who died on April 25, 1995 at the age of 23 after contracting pneumonia.[21] He scored again in the next game, a 4–0 win at Novara, which Juventus won the Serie A title since 2003.[22] On 30 June, Borriello returned to Roma despite wishing to sign permanently for Juventus.[23]

Return to Genoa[edit]

Juventus decided not to purchase Borriello after his loan spell at the club and he returned to Roma. He was not in new coach Zdeněk Zeman's plans and he was placed on the transfer list.[24] On 31 August 2012, the final day of the Italian transfer market, Genoa signed him from Roma and sent Alberto Gilardino to Bologna F.C. 1909 also in temporary deal.[25] Genoa paid Roma €250,000 with part of his wages being paid by Roma.[26]

After making eight appearance and scoring three, Borriello then suffered a trauma injury in the right ankle, putting him out of action for forty-five days.[27] Despite the injury, Borriello ended the season as the club's top scorer, and they avoided relegation by one place.

Return to Roma[edit]

With Genoa deciding not to purchase Borriello in full after his loan spell at the club, he returned to Roma. He started in the first game of the season against Livorno playing 60 minutes. On 31 October 2013 he scored a historical winner against Chievo Verona helping the team maintain its 100% record after ten games. It was his first goal in 2013-14 season.[28]

West Ham United[edit]

On 25 January 2014, he signed for West Ham United on loan for the remainder of the season for €700,000.[29][30] He made only two substitute appearances for West Ham before a calf-strain injury in February marked the end of his playing time for West Ham. [31][32]

International career[edit]

Borriello received his first Italian national team call-up for a friendly against Portugal, which took place on 6 February 2008 in Zürich, Switzerland. He replaced Luca Toni for the final twenty minutes, with Italy winning 3–1.[33] He also played in the next two friendlies, coming on as a substitute for Toni on both occasions. Borriello was in the squad for Euro 2008 but did not play.[34] He was in Marcello Lippi's 28-man provisional 2010 FIFA World Cup squad but was not included in the 23-man final squad.[35]

Personal life[edit]

Borriello grew up in the area of San Giovanni a Teduccio in Naples. His father was killed by the camorra when Marco was still a child,[36] and he was raised along with siblings Fabio and Piergiorgio by his mother Margherita.[37]

Honours[edit]


Career statistics[edit]

Club Season Domestic
League
Domestic
Cup
European
Competition1
Other
Tournaments2
Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Triestina Jan.–Jun.2001 9[38] 1 - - - - - - 9 1
Treviso 2001–02 27[38] 10 3[39] 1 - - - - 30 11
Treviso Total 36 11 3 1  –  –  –  – 39 12
Milan 2002–Jan. 03 3[38] 0 2[39] 1 1[39] 0 - - 6 1
Empoli Jan.– Jun. 2003 12[38] 1 - - - - - - 12 1
Milan 2003–04 4[38] 0 6[39] 0 1[39] 0 - - 11 0
Reggina 2004–05 30[38] 2 2[39] 1 - - - - 32 3
Sampdoria 2005–Jan. 06 11[38] 2 1[39] 0 2[39] 0 - - 14 2
Treviso Jan.–Jun. 2006 20[38] 5 - - - - - - 20 5
Milan 2006–07 9[38] 1 2[39] 2 3[39] 0 - - 14 3
Milan Total 89 11 13 4 7 0  –  – 109 15
Genoa 2007–08 35[38] 19 2[39] 0 - - - - 37 19
Genoa Total 35 19 2 0  –  –  –  – 37 19
Milan 2008–09 7[38] 1 0[39] 0 1[39] 1 - - 8 2
2009–10 29[38] 14 1[39] 0 5[39] 1 - - 35 15
Aug. 2010 1[38] 0 0[39] 0 0[39] 0 - - 1 0
Milan Total 37 15 1 0 6 2  –  – 44 17
Roma 2010–11 34[38] 11 4[39] 2 8[39] 4 - - 46 17
2011–12 7 0 0 0 1 0 - - 8 0
Juventus Jan.–Jun.2012 13 2 4 0 - - - - 17 2
Genoa 2012-13 28 12 0 0 0 0 - - 28 12
Roma 2013–14 11 1 0 0 0 0 - - 11 1
West Ham Jan.–Jun.2014 - - - - - -
Roma Total

1European Competitions include the UEFA Champions League, UEFA Cup and UEFA Super Cup.

2Other Tournaments include the FIFA Club World Cup.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Premier League Clubs submit Squad Lists" (PDF). Premier League. 4 February 2014. p. 40. Retrieved 9 February 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c FIGC (Italian)
  3. ^ "La Roma si prende derby e vetta Primi sussulti di Juventus e Milan". La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). 10 December 2000. Retrieved 27 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "Triestina: Berti vuole chiarezza". La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). 26 June 2001. Retrieved 15 November 2010. 
  5. ^ "Reggina loan Borriello". Sky Sports. 9 July 2005. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  6. ^ "Treviso loan Borriello". Sky Sports. 3 February 2006. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  7. ^ "Borriello suspended after drug test". UEFA.com. 22 December 2006. Retrieved 15 November 2010. 
  8. ^ "Marco 'cort' with his trousers down". Daily Mail (London). 17 January 2007. Retrieved January 2011. 
  9. ^ "Precious announces: "Borriello is a player of Genoa"" [Preziosi annuncia: "Borriello è un giocatore del Genoa"] (in Italian). Tutto Napoli. 22 June 2007. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  10. ^ "Il Milan tiene Abbiati e riscatta Borriello". La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). 29 May 2008. Retrieved 12 March 2011. 
  11. ^ Genoa CFC report and accounts on 30 June 2008 (Italian)
  12. ^ AC Milan bilancio on 31 December 2008 (Italian)
  13. ^ "Roma forward Marco Borriello: I was hurt by the AC Milan fans". Goal.com. 20 December 2010. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  14. ^ "ACQUISIZIONE A TITOLO TEMPORANEO, CON OBBLIGO DI RISCATTO PER L’ACQUISIZIONE A TITOLO DEFINITIVO DEI DIRITTI ALLE PRESTAZIONI SPORTIVE DEL CALCIATORE MARCO BORRIELLO" (PDF). AS Roma (in Italian). 31 August 2010. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  15. ^ "City missed out on Borriello". Sky Sports. 3 September 2010. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  16. ^ "Cagliari, magical evening Roma are overwhelmed 5-1" [Cagliari, serata magicaLa Roma è travolta 5-1] (in Italian). Le Gazzetta dello Sport. 11 September 2010. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  17. ^ "Two penalties revived the Rome Lazio falls and protest" [Due rigori rilanciano la RomaLa Lazio cade e protesta] (in Italian). Le Gazzetta dello Sport. 7 October 2010. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  18. ^ "Juventus to complete deal for Roma's Marco Borriello on Monday". Retrieved 2 January 2012. 
  19. ^ "Agreement with A.S. Roma for the temporary acquisition of the player Marco Borriello". Juventus FC. 3 January 2012. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  20. ^ "Marco Borriello disappointed by derogatory banner but determined to prove himself to Juventus fans". Goal.com. 10 January 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  21. ^ "Borriello dedicates winner at Cesena to former Juventus player Fortunato". Goal.com. 25 April 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  22. ^ "Cessione A Titolo Temporaneo Con Diritto Di Opzione Per L'acquisizione A Titolo Definitivo Dei Diritti Alle Prestazioni Sportive Del Calciatore Marco Borriello" (in Italian). AS Roma. 3 January 2012. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  23. ^ "Borriello hopes for Juventus stay". Goal.com. 23 April 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  24. ^ "Roma transfer list Borriello". Sky Sports. 9 July 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  25. ^ "Genoa return for Borriello". Sky Sports. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  26. ^ "PERAZIONI DI MERCATO Marco Borriello e Mauro Goicoechea" (in Italian). AS Roma. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 27 January 2014. 
  27. ^ "Genoa Forward Marco Borriello Out Injured 45 Days confirmed on October 23, 2012". Italian Soccer Serie A. 23 October 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2013. 
  28. ^ "Roma-Chievo 1-0, dieci vittorie e record. Stregati da Borriello, Olimpico in delirio" (in Italian). www.ilmessaggero.it. 31 October 2013. Retrieved 26 January 2014. 
  29. ^ "Borriello Signs". www.whufc.com. 25 January 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  30. ^ "Marco Borriello" (in Italian). AS Roma. 25 January 2014. Retrieved 27 January 2014. 
  31. ^ "2013-14 season appearances". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  32. ^ "TEAM NEWS: Marco Borriello absent for West Ham as they travel to Stoke". Daily Star. 13 March 2014. Retrieved 13 May 2014. 
  33. ^ "Italy 3-1 Portugal". ESPNfc. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  34. ^ "Italy squad for Euro 2008". The Guardian. 28 May 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  35. ^ "Pronta la squadra azzurra: ecco la lista dei 23 per il Mondiale". FIGC (in Italian). Retrieved 1 June 2010. 
  36. ^ "Roma, Borriello: “Me, Belen, Saviano gays in football, my murdered father”". English.Gazetta.It. 9 November 2013. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  37. ^ "Ora Borriello sogna il quarto gol contro il Napoli nel suo stadio" (in Italian). Ricerca.Republicca.it. 30 September 2010. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Lega Serie A profile" (in Italian). Lega Serie A. Retrieved 27 January 2014. 
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s La Gazzetta dello Sport profile (Italian)

External links[edit]

Marco Borriello career stats at Soccerbase