Marcos Conigliaro

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Marcos Conigliaro
Personal information
Full name Marcos Norberto Conigliaro
Date of birth (1942-12-09) December 9, 1942 (age 71)
Place of birth Quilmes, Argentina
Playing position Forward
Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1959-1961 Quilmes 9 (2)
1962-1963 Independiente 21 (4)
1964 Chacarita Juniors 29 (10)
1965-1970 Estudiantes 196 (46)
1971-1972 Jalisco ? (?)
1972-1974 K.S.V. Oudenaarde ? (?)
1974-1975 Lugano ? (?)
1976 Everton ? (?)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Marcos Norberto Conigliaro (born December 9, 1942) is an Argentine football coach and former professional player.

Biography[edit]

Conigliaro was born in Quilmes. As a player, he was a forward renowned for his technical ability. He played for many clubs in Argentina and abroad. His debut in Argentina was with Quilmes at the age of 15. He then played for Independiente, Chacarita Juniors, Estudiantes, Jalisco,[1] K.S.V. Oudenaarde, Lugano, and Everton. In 1965, he arrived to Estudiantes de La Plata, who were a dominant force in Argentine and South American football during the late 1960s. During his time in Estudiantes, Conigliaro won three Copa Libertadores and the 1968 Intercontinental Cup. In the first game of the Intercontinental Cup, he scored the winning and only goal against Manchester United.

Overall, Conigliaro played in 277 games, scoring 65 goals.

As a player, he won seven championships: six playing for Estudiantes (1967 Metropolitano, 1968-1970 Copa Libertadores, 1968 Intercontinental Cup, and 1969 Interamericana Cup ) and one playing for Independiente (1963 AFA Championship).

After he retired from soccer, Conigliaro became a coach. He coached Unión de Santa Fe in the Argentine first division. Since 1996, he has been coaching Atlético San Jorge de Santa Fe, which plays in the Argentino B division.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rosas, Sergio Luis (1 June 2011). "Recuerdos del Ayer" [Memories of yesterday] (in Spanish). El Siglo de Torreon. 

External links[edit]