Marcus Drum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Marcus Drum
Personal information
Full name Marcus James Drum
Date of birth (1987-05-01) 1 May 1987 (age 27)
Original team Murray Bushrangers (TAC Cup)
Draft #10, 2005 National Draft, Fremantle
Height/Weight 191cm / 87kg
Position(s) Defender
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
2006–2009 Fremantle 22 (6)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 2011 season.

Marcus James Drum (born 1 May 1987) is an Australian rules footballer who played in the Australian Football League (AFL) for the Fremantle Football Club between 2006 and 2009 before he was traded to Geelong during the 2009 trade week.

In July 2011 Geelong announced that Drum had retired due to ongoing injury problems.[1] In October 2013 he joined Port Adelaide as a player welfare manager.[2]

Recruited from the Murray Bushrangers, Drum is the nephew of former Geelong player, Fremantle coach and current Victorian Nationals MLC Damian Drum. He is a nephew of champion Richmond player and coach Francis Bourke[3] and cousin of Richmond and North Melbourne player David Bourke. He is also a cousin of Geelong and St Kilda player Steven King (footballer), through their mothers. In the 2005 National Draft, Drum was selected with the 10th overall draft pick.

AFL career[edit]

Fremantle (2006–2009)[edit]

Drum played five games in the 2006 AFL season, and won Fremantle's Beacon Award for the best up-and-coming player at the Club's Doig Medal dinner in October 2006.[4]

He did not play until round 16 in the 2007 AFL season, when new coach Mark Harvey chose him in the squad to take on Adelaide at AAMI Stadium. In a win for Fremantle, he kicked 4 handy goals for the team. However, he only played two more matches for the season, against Geelong in round 17 and Port Adelaide in round 22. 2008 saw Drum play 9 games, his highest annual tally to date, including the final four matches. After playing in the opening round of the 2009 AFL season, Drum didn't return to the AFL until Round 19, when he again played the final four games. During the season his form for Perth in the WAFL was poor,[5] but despite this he was a surprise selection for the last four games.[6]

During the 2009 AFL trade week, Drum was traded to Geelong for a third round draft pick, number 49 overall.[7]

Geelong (2010–2011)[edit]

Due to a succession of injuries, including a detached retina and injuries to his Achilles tendon and hamstring, Drum struggled to play regularly for Geelong's side in the Victorian Football League (VFL) and never made his senior debut for Geelong in the AFL. In the middle of the 2011 AFL season he announced his retirement from AFL football after only playing 6 games in two seasons in the VFL.[1]

Statistics[edit]

Statistics are correct to end of AFL career.[8][9]
Season Team # Games G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
Totals Averages (per game)
2006 Fremantle 30 5 1 1 32 19 51 18 13 0.2 0.2 6.4 3.8 10.2 3.6 2.6
2007 Fremantle 30 3 4 1 16 20 36 11 3 1.3 0.3 5.3 6.7 12.0 3.7 1.0
2008 Fremantle 30 9 1 0 75 64 139 55 22 0.1 0.0 8.3 7.1 15.4 6.1 2.4
2009 Fremantle 9 5 0 0 37 34 71 22 14 0.0 0.0 7.4 6.8 14.2 4.4 2.8
2010 Geelong 23 0
2011 Geelong 23 0
Career 22 6 2 160 137 297 106 52 0.3 0.1 7.3 6.2 13.5 4.8 2.4
Legend
 G  Goals  B  Behinds  K  Kicks  H  Handballs  D  Disposals  M  Marks  T  Tackles

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bradshaw, Finn (21 July 2011) Geelong Cats defender Marcus Drum calls it quits; Herald Sun
  2. ^ McNicol, Adam (16 November 2013). "How a battered Drum keeps the beat alive". 
  3. ^ Denham, Greg (21 June 2010). "Geelong still banging Drum". The Australian. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. 
  4. ^ Middleton, Katie; Youngsters Sign on until 2009; 16 May 2007
  5. ^ It all comes down to attitude
  6. ^ Pike, Chris (7 August 2009) WAFL Round 20 preview: Finals contenders face off
  7. ^ Broad, Ben (8 October 2009) Mumford heads to Swans, Geelong gets Drum
  8. ^ "Marcus Drum statistics". AFL Tables. Retrieved 31 December 2011. 
  9. ^ "Marcus Drum of the Geelong Cats Career AFL Stats". footywire.com. Retrieved 31 December 2011. 

External links[edit]