Marcus Licinius Scribonianus Camerinus

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Marcus Licinius Scribonianus Camerinus was a wealthy Roman Senator that lived in the Roman Empire in the 1st century.

Life[edit]

Camerinus came from a family that was of distinction which had fame and lineage.[1] He was one of the sons and among the children born to Marcus Licinius Crassus Frugi consul of 64, son of Roman Politician Marcus Licinius Crassus Frugi and Scribonia,[2] from his wife Sulpicia Praetextata daughter of the suffect consul in 46, Quintus Sulpicius Camerinus Peticus.[3][4] He was born and raised in Rome.

The father of Camerinus, Frugi was executed by the Roman emperor Nero between 66 and 68, because of information brought against him by Marcus Aquilius Regulus.[5] After the death of Frugi, his mother took Camerinus with his siblings, to a Roman Senate meeting in 70 early in the reign of Roman emperor Vespasian, seeking vengeance for his father’s death.[6] Regulus with his associated political circle was prosecuted by the Roman Senate.[7]

Marriage & Issue[edit]

Camerinus married the Patrician Roman noblewoman Volusia Cornelia. She was a daughter and among one of the children born to the Politician Quintus Volusius Saturninus from his wife Nonia Torquata.[8] Camerinus with Volusia had a daughter called Licinia Cornelia Volusia Torquata.[9]

Inscriptional Evidence[edit]

His name has been found in a funerary inscription in Rome of his daughter, Licinia Cornelia Volusia Torquata. The inscription which is dated from the second half of the 1st century til the first half of the 2nd century, is now on display at the National Museum of Rome.[10] The inscription which reads in Latin is translated in English:

Licinia Cornelia/M(arci) f(ilia) Volusia/Torquata/L(uci) Volusi co(n)s(ulis)/auguris
Licinia Cornelia Volusia Torquata, the daughter of Marcus, the wife of Lucius Volusius, consul, augur.[11]

Namesake Slave[edit]

Camerinus had an adventurous runaway slave called Geta who impersonated him who bore his name as Licinius Scribonianus Camerinus.[12] In 69 during the brief reign of Roman emperor Vitellius, he wanted to upset the emperor and his government.[13] Geta pretended to have obliged to leave Rome in the time of Roman emperor Nero and to have since then lived concealed in Histria, because he belonged to the Crassi family in which he owned large possessions in Histria.[14] Geta managed in succeeding the local population and even some soldiers in assembling around him who were misled by him or wished for a revolution. However Geta was seized and brought before Vitellius. When Geta’s real origin was revealed, Vitellius had him executed as a common slave.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rudich, Political Dissidence Under Nero: The Price of Dissimulation
  2. ^ Romeins Imperium – Marcus Licinius Crassus Frugi translated from Dutch to English
  3. ^ Rudich, Political Dissidence Under Nero: The Price of Dissimulation
  4. ^ Romeins Imperium – Marcus Licinius Crassus Frugi translated from Dutch to English
  5. ^ Shelton, The Women of Pliny's Letters, p.153
  6. ^ Shelton, The Women of Pliny's Letters, p.153
  7. ^ Rutledge, Imperial Inquisitions: Prosecutors and Informants from Tiberius to Domitian, p.119
  8. ^ Genealogy of Volusius Saturninus by D.C. O’Driscoll
  9. ^ Genealogy of Volusius Saturninus by D.C. O’Driscoll
  10. ^ Funerary inscription of Licinia Cornelia Volusia Torquata
  11. ^ Funerary inscription of Licinia Cornelia Volusia Torquata
  12. ^ Rudich, Political Dissidence Under Nero: The Price of Dissimulation
  13. ^ Scribonianus Camerinus article at ancient library
  14. ^ Scribonianus Camerinus article at ancient library
  15. ^ Scribonianus Camerinus article at ancient library

Sources[edit]