Marcus M. Marks

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Marcus M. Marks
Marks 3820618400 6e7b86c40f o.jpg
Born (1858-03-18)March 18, 1858
Schenectady, New York
Died March 26, 1934(1934-03-26) (aged 76)
Title Manhattan Borough President
Term 1914-1917
Predecessor George McAneny
Successor Frank Dowling

Marcus M. Marks (March 18, 1858 - August 26, 1934) was president of the Daylight Saving Association, president of the Clothier's Association, and Manhattan Borough President from 1914 to 1917.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

He was born on March 18, 1858 in Schenectady, New York. In 1877 he started his first business in Passaic, New Jersey and later started work at the wholesale clothing firm of his father, David Marks & Sons. He was president of the Clothiers' Association of New York, and president of the National Association of Clothiers, president of the Clothing Trade Association of New York, and chairman of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association Trade Auxiliary. He later served also as trustee of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association, director of the Educational Alliance, member of the Conciliation Committee of the National Civic Federation, director of the National Butchers' and Drovers' Bank.[3] He died on August 26, 1934.[2][1] His wife died on April 22, 1937.[4]

Legacy[edit]

Marks was the brother of Louis B. Marks (1869-1939), a leading illumination (lighting) engineer. Louis’ son was the famous songwriter Johnny Marks (1909-1985), who wrote “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer”.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Marcus M. Marks". New York Times. April 28, 1934. Retrieved 2009-08-19. "Above all else it will be remembered of Marcus M. Marks that he caused the sun to advance in its Summer course by putting forward the clocks which measure the hours of light and darkness. He was the acknowledged leader in the "daylight-saving" movement in America, with its immeasurable wholesome results in the lives of millions." 
  2. ^ a b "Marcus M. Marks". Political Graveyard. Retrieved 2009-08-19. "Marks, Marcus M. (b. 1858) — of Manhattan, New York County, N.Y. Born in Schenectady, Schenectady County, N.Y., March 18, 1858. Son of David Marks and Leontine (Meyer) Marks; married, May 21, 1890, to Esther Friedman. President, National Daylight Saving Association; borough president of Manhattan, New York, 1914-17. Jewish. Burial location unknown." 
  3. ^ "Marcus M. Marks". Jewish Encyclopedia. 1904. Retrieved 2009-08-19. "American merchant; born at Schenectady, N. Y., March 18, 1858. In 1877 he started a business at Passaic, N. J., and later entered the wholesale clothing firm of his father, David Marks & Sons. He has held many prominent positions in connection with the clothing trade, being president of the Clothiers' Association of New York, president of the National Association of Clothiers, president of the Clothing Trade Association of New York, and chairman of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association Trade Auxiliary. He has served also as trustee of the Hospital Saturday and Sunday Association, director of the Educational Alliance, member of the Conciliation Committee of the National Civic Federation, director of the National Butchers' and Drovers' Bank, and is now (1904) organizing credit cooperation in several trades, with the view of establishing a central clearing-house for direct trade information. Marks has been a contributor to labor and trade journals on subjects of labor and conciliation and on credit cooperation." 
  4. ^ "Widow of Manhattan Borough President and Sponsor of Day light-Saving Time Dies". New York Times. April 23, 1937. Retrieved 2009-08-19. "Mrs. Marcus M. Marks, widow of the Borough President of Manhattan, died of a heart ailment yesterday in her home at 300 Park Avenue. She was 67 years old." 
  5. ^ Bloom, Nate (2011-12-20). "Shining a Light on the Largely Untold Story of the Origins of Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer". InterfaithFamily.com. Retrieved 2011-12-22.