Marián Vajda

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Marián Vajda
Marián Vajda1.jpg
Country  Czechoslovakia (1984–92)
 Slovakia (1993–)
Residence Bratislava, Slovakia
Born (1965-03-24) March 24, 1965 (age 49)
Považská Bystrica, Czechoslovakia
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in)
Turned pro 1984
Retired 1994
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $756,646
Singles
Career record 119–152
Career titles 2
Highest ranking No. 34 (September 14, 1987)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (1991)
French Open 3R (1991)
Wimbledon 2R (1989)
US Open 2R (1985)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games 1R (1992)
Doubles
Career record 23–43
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 118 (April 16, 1990)
Last updated on: April 1, 2012.
Marián Vajda
Career record 119–152
Career record 23–43
Coaching career (1995–)
Coaching achievements
Coachee Singles Titles total 19
Coachee(s) Doubles Titles total 1
List of notable tournaments
(with champion)
Coaching awards and records
Awards

Best coach by the Olympic Committee of Serbia (2010, 2011)

Marián Vajda (born March 24, 1965) is a former Slovak tennis player.

Vajda was born in Považská Bystrica. He was a member of the Olympic Team of Czechoslovakia, and in 1992 he competed in the Olympic Games of Barcelona, being eliminated in the first round by Gilad Bloom 7–6, 6–1, 6–0. He reached the third round of the 1991 French Open; won 2 singles titles and achieved a career-high singles ranking of World No. 34 in September 1987.

Vajda is a former captain of the Slovakia Davis Cup and Fed Cup teams. Vajda was the coach of Novak Djokovic from June 2006 until it was announced in December 2013 that Boris Becker would become Djokovic's new head coach with Vajda remaining part of Djokovic's team.[1] For his great success with the Serbian tennis player, Vajda won the award for best coach by the Olympic Committee of Serbia in both 2010 and 2011.[2]

ATP Tour titles (2)[edit]

Singles wins (2)[edit]

No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score
1. August 10, 1987 Prague, Czechoslovakia Clay Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd 6–1, 6–3
2. September 19, 1988 Geneva, Switzerland Clay Sweden Kent Carlsson 6–4, 6–4

Singles runner-ups (2)[edit]

No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score
1. May 4, 1987 Munich, West Germany Clay Argentina Guillermo Pérez Roldán 3–6, 6–7
2. June 19, 1989 Bari, Italy Clay Spain Juan Aguilera 6–4, 3–6, 4–6

References[edit]

External links[edit]