Mari Gorman

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Mari Gorman
Occupation Actress, artistic director
Years active 1968 - present

Mari Gorman is an American actress perhaps best known for her work in television, particularly as one of the informal repertory company of the 1970s and 1980s sitcom Barney Miller, on which she made a half-dozen appearances. She has won two Obie Awards and is the founder of the New York City theater company Glass Beads Theatre Ensemble.

Biography[edit]

Mari Gorman broke into professional theater with a production of the Arnold Wesker play The Kitchen, directed by Jack Gelber.[1] One of her first major screen roles was as murder victim and mob pawn Taffy Simms on the television soap opera The Edge of Night in the 1970s. She was a cast member of the Barbara Eden sitcom Harper Valley PTA, playing PTA member, Vivian Washburn, and was one of the informal repertory company of the 1970s and 1980s sitcom Barney Miller, on which she made a half-dozen appearances, including as an amateur prostitute housewife (in Series 4 Episode 3, "Bugs") and as a police detective with a jealous husband (in Series 4, Episode 18, "Wojo's Problem" and other episodes).

Theater work includes the lead role in The Girl in The Red Convertible, by Enrique Buenaventura, in the premiere production of The Third Stage at Stratford Shakespeare Festival, in Ontario, Canada; Pam in the American premiere of Saved by Edward Bond, with the Yale Repertory Theatre; and Kathy in the world premiere of Moonchildren (originally titled Cancer) by Michael Weller at Royal Court Theatre in London, England.[1]

Her films include Goodbye, Columbus (1969), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974), 10 (1979), Oh, God! Book II (1980), and Max Dugan Returns (1983).[2]

She has also directed theater and teaches acting, and founded the New York City theater company Glass Beads Theatre Ensemble. In 2003, she produced and directed Cries for Peace, composed of firsthand accounts of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. She produced and directed playwright Michael Locascio's Glass Beads production Lily of the Conservative Ladies,[3] staged at the June Havoc Theatre; and she produced, directed and, with Danna Call and Craig Pospisil, co-wrote Browsing, performed as part of the 2011 New York International Fringe Festival.[1]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Walking to Waldheim: by Mayo Simon, directed by George L. Sherman at Lincoln Center, New York, NY
  2. ^ The Memorandum: by Václav Havel, directed by Joseph Papp at The Public Theater, New York, NY
  3. ^ The Hot l Baltimore: by Lanford Wilson, directed by Marshall W. Mason at the Circle in the Square Theatre, Circle Repertory Company, New York, NY
  4. ^ Vanities: By Jack Heifner, Pilot II Theater, Los Angeles, California

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gorman, Mari (2007). Strokes of existence : the connection of all things. North Charleston, S.C.: Booksurge Pub. ISBN 978-1419673160. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Company". Glass Beads Theatre Ensemble. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Mari Gorman: Credits". TVGuide.com. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. 
  3. ^ Violanti, Heather J. (February 3, 2011). "Lily of the Conservative Ladies". (review) NYTheatre.com. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Al Pacino, Sam Shepard, Roy Scheider, Estelle Parsons -- It's Obies 1968!" 13 (33). Reprint of "23 Win '68 'Obies'". Village Voice. May 30, 1968. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Christopher Lloyd! Stacy Keach! Jessica Tandy! It's the 1973 Obies!!" 18 (21). Reprint of Berman, Audrey. "The '73 'Obies': Plays were the thing'". Village Voice. May 24, 1973. Archived from the original on April 21, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Theatre World Award Recipients". Theatre World Awards (official site). Archived from the original on April 22, 2012. Retrieved April 22, 2012. 
  7. ^ Google cache of "1972-1973 19th Drama Desk Awards", formerly listed at Drama Desk official site.
  8. ^ "The Clarence Derwent Award 2010". Actors' Equity Association. Archived from the original on April 22, 2012. Retrieved April 22, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Vanities". GailEdwards.com. undated. 

External links[edit]