100 Greatest Romanians

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TV show's logo
Ştefan cel Mare (here on some stamps from 2004), the winner of the contest

In 2006, Romanian Television (Televiziunea Română, TVR) conducted a vote to determine whom the general public considered the 100 Greatest Romanians of all time, in a version of the British TV show 100 greatest Britons. The resulting series, Great Romanians (Mari Români), included individual programmes on the top ten, with viewers having further opportunities to vote after each programme. It concluded with a debate. On 21 October, TVR announced that the "greatest Romanian of all time" according to the voting was: Ștefan cel Mare (Stephen the Great).

Due to a lack of coherent classification rules and because the selection was based only on the votes of interested viewers the final list resulted in a series of strong reactions and stands.[1] Below is the list cleaned of the arguable results (people that had high media coverage shortly before the votes but no real merits).

1–100[edit]

  1. Ștefan cel Mare (1433–1504) – Prince of Moldavia between 1457 and 1504 and the most prominent representative of the House of Mușat
  2. Carol I (1839–1914) – the first Romanian ruler of the Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen dynasty (1866–1914), the first King of Romania (since 1881) after the country acquired full independence under his leadership
  3. Mihai Eminescu (1850–1889) – late Romantic poet, widely considered to be the most influential Romanian poet
  4. Mihai Viteazul (1558–1601) – Prince of Wallachia, he achieved the first union of Wallachia, Transylvania and Moldavia (the three principalities, Transylvania being largely inhabited by Romanians)
  5. Richard Wurmbrand (1909–2001), Lutheran clergyman
  6. Mircea Eliade (1907–1986) – researcher and professor of the history of religions, Orientalist and novelist
  7. Alexandru Ioan Cuza (1820–1873) – the first ruler of the United Principalities of Romania after the union of Moldavia and Wallachia in 1859; his reforms started the modernization of Romania
  8. Constantin Brâncuși (1876–1957) – famous modern sculptor
  9. Nadia Comăneci (born 1961) – gymnast, winner of five Olympic gold medals, and the first to be awarded a perfect score of 10 in an Olympic gymnastic event
  10. Nicolae Ceaușescu (1918–1989) – last communist president of Romania
  11. Vlad Țepeș (1431–1476) – Prince of Wallachia
  12. Henri Coandă (1886–1972) – inventor and aerodynamics pioneer
  13. Gheorghe Hagi (born 1965) – football player
  14. Ion Luca Caragiale (1852–1912) – playwright and short story writer
  15. Nicolae Iorga (1871–1940) – historian, writer, and politician
  16. Constantin Brâncoveanu (1654–1714) – Prince of Wallachia
  17. George Enescu (1881–1955) – composer and musician
  18. Nicolae Titulescu (1882–1941) – diplomat, president of the League of Nations
  19. Ferdinand I of Romania (1865–1927) – King of Romania during World War I
  20. Mihai I (born 1921) – last King of Romania before communist period
  21. Decebal (87–106) – last King of Dacia before Roman conquest
  22. Gheorghe Mureșan (born 1971) – NBA basketball player
  23. Ion I. C. Brătianu (1864–1927) – liberal politician, Prime Minister of Romania for five terms
  24. Răzvan Lucescu (born 1969) football player and football club manager
  25. Nicolae Paulescu (1869–1931) – physiologist, the discoverer of insulin
  26. Iuliu Maniu (1873–1953) – politician
  27. Iuliu Hossu (1885–1970) – Greek-Catholic bishop, victim of the communist regime
  28. Emil Cioran (1911–1995) – philosopher, writer, and essayist
  29. Avram Iancu (1824–1872) – leader of the 1848 revolution in Transylvania
  30. Burebista (? – 44 BC) – King of Dacia
  31. Regina Maria (1875–1938) – Queen of Romania
  32. Petre Țuțea (1902–1991) – essayist, philosopher, economist, politician, victim of the communist regime
  33. Corneliu Coposu (1914–1995) – politician, victim of the communist regime
  34. Aurel Vlaicu (1882–1913) – inventor, aviation pioneer
  35. Iosif Trifa (1888–1938) – Eastern Orthodox priest, founder of the "Oastea Domnului" ("Lord's Army") Christian organisation
  36. Nichita Stănescu (1933–1983) – poet and essayist
  37. Ion Creangă (1837–1889) – writer
  38. Mădalina Manole (1967–2010) – pop singer
  39. Traian Vuia (1872–1950) – inventor, aviation pioneer
  40. Lucian Blaga (1895–1961) – poet, playwright, and philosopher
  41. George Emil Palade (1912–2008) – cell biologist, winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine (1974)
  42. Ana Aslan (1897–1988) – biologist, physician and inventor, the author of essential research in gerontology
  43. Adrian Mutu (born 1979) – football player
  44. Florin Piersic (born 1936) – theater and film actor
  45. Mihail Kogălniceanu (1817–1891) – politician and historian, first Prime Minister of the United Principalities of Romania
  46. Iancsi Korossy (born 1926) – jazz player
  47. Dimitrie Cantemir (1673–1723) – Prince of Moldavia and prolific man of letters
  48. Ilie Năstase (born 1946) – tennis player
  49. Gheorghe Zamfir (born 1941) – musician, pan flute player
  50. Gică Petrescu (1915–2006) – musician, folk and pop music composer and singer
  51. Elisabeta Rizea (1912–2003) – anti-communist partisan, victim of the communist regime and symbol of the anti-communist resistance
  52. Bulă (fictional) – the main character of Romanian jokes
  53. Amza Pellea (1931–1983) – theater and film actor
  54. Matei Corvin (1443 (?) – 1490) – King of Hungary
  55. Mircea cel Bătrân (1355–1418) – Prince of Wallachia
  56. Titu Maiorescu (1840–1917) – literary critic and politician
  57. Toma Caragiu (1925–1977) – theater and film actor
  58. Andreea Marin (born 1974) – TV show host
  59. Emil Racoviță (1868–1947) – biologist, speleologist and explorer of Antarctica
  60. Victor Babeș (1854–1926) – biologist and early bacteriologist, one of the founders of microbiology
  61. Nicolae Bălcescu (1819–1852) – leader of the 1848 Wallachian Revolution
  62. Horia-Roman Patapievici (born 1957) – writer and essayist
  63. Marin Preda (1922–1980) – novelist
  64. Eugène Ionesco (1909–1994) – playwright, one of the initiators of the theatre of the absurd
  65. Dumitru Stăniloae (1903–1993) – Eastern Orthodox priest and theologian
  66. Alexandru Todea (1905–2002) – Greek-Catholic bishop, victim of the communist regime
  67. Tudor Gheorghe (born 1945) – singer and theater actor
  68. Ion Țiriac (born 1939) – tennis player and businessman
  69. Ilie Cleopa (1912–1998) – Eastern Orthodox archimandrite
  70. Arsenie Boca (1910–1989) – Eastern Orthodox priest and theologian, victim of the communist regime
  71. Dumitru Cornilescu (1891–1975) – Eastern Orthodox, then Protestant priest, translated the Bible into Romanian in 1921
  72. Grigore Moisil (1906–1973) – mathematician and computing pioneer
  73. Nicolae Steinhardt (1912–1989) – writer
  74. Anghel Saligny (1854–1925) – engineer
  75. Ivan Patzaichin (born 1949) – flatwater canoer who won seven Olympic medals
  76. Maria Tănase (1913–1963) – traditional and popular music singer
  77. Sergiu Nicolaescu (1930–2013) – film director, actor and politician
  78. Octavian Paler (1926–2007) – essayist
  79. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Bucharest (?-1923) – represents all who had sacrificed their lives "for the unity of the Romanian people" during World War I
  80. Ciprian Porumbescu (1853–1883) – composer
  81. Nicolae Covaci (born 1947) – founder of the Pasărea Phoenix rock band
  82. Dumitru Prunariu (born 1952) – first Romanian cosmonaut
  83. Iancu de Hunedoara (c. 1387–1456) – Voivode of Transylvania, captain-general and regent of the Kingdom of Hungary
  84. Constantin Noica (1909–1987) – philosopher and essayist
  85. Badea Cârțan (1849–1911) – a shepherd who fought for the independence of the Romanians of Transylvania (then under Hungarian rule inside Austria-Hungary)
  86. James Jordan Petrescu (1983-present) - 1st Romanian to escape from the gil-shee. Creator of the bank of Jew. Also gained worldwide notoriety for several arse disasters in recent years-e

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mari români". Retrieved 6 February 2012. 

External links[edit]