Maria Rybakova

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Maria Aleksadrovna Rybakova (Russian: Мари́я Александровна Рыбако́ва) (b. 1973 in Moscow) is a Russian writer, whose works are published in multiple languages.

Life[edit]

Rybakova is the only daughter of literary critic Natalia Ivanova, deputy editor of journal Znamya, and granddaughter of Russian writer Anatoly Rybakov.

She studied Classics starting at the age of 17, when she entered Moscow University, and moved to Germany when she was 20 to continue her studies at the Humboldt University, ultimately receiving a Ph.D. degree in Classics from Yale University in 2004. Over the years she worked and travelled in number of places, including Geneva, Munich, the Mekong River region in Thailand, and Northeast China.

She was awarded Sergei Dovlatov Award in 2003 for the best Russian language short story.

In 2005, Rybakova was a writer-in-residence at Bard College, and in 2006-2007 she taught at California State University, Long Beach. In autumn 2007 she joined the Classics and Humanities faculty of San Diego State University([1]).

Major works[edit]

  • "Анна Гром и ее призрак", Глагол, 1999.
  • "Тайна: Повести и роман", Екатеринбург: У-Фактория, 2001
  • The Child-snatching Demons of Antiquity: Narrative Traditions, Psychology and Nachleben, Ph.D. thesis, Yale University, 2004.
  • "Братство проигравших", Время, 2005.
  • "Слепая речь" (сборник рассказов), Время, 2006.
  • "Острый нож для мягкого сердца", Время, 2009.

Anna Grom and her Ghost (novel)[edit]

The author's picture is on the cover of the Russian edition of her first book (Анна Гром и ее призрак), which has been translated to German and Spanish ("Die Reise der Anna Grom", Rowohlt, Berlin, 2001; "El fantasma de Anna Grom", Lengua de trapo, 2004). It was also nominated for the Russian "Booker" prize.

Loser's Brotherhood (novel)[edit]

The novel has been translated into French ("La Confrèrie des perdants", Seuil, 2006).

External links[edit]