Marian University (Wisconsin)

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Marian University
Marian University seal.jpg
Academic Seal
Motto sicut lilium inter spinas
Motto in English As a lily among thorns
Established 1936
Type Private, Liberal Arts
Religious affiliation Roman Catholic
President Robert Fale
Academic staff 270
Admin. staff 160
Students 2,180
Undergraduates 1,680
Postgraduates 500
Location Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, U.S.
43°46′40″N 88°25′54″W / 43.77778°N 88.43167°W / 43.77778; -88.43167Coordinates: 43°46′40″N 88°25′54″W / 43.77778°N 88.43167°W / 43.77778; -88.43167
Former names Marian College
Colors         
Sports

NCAA Div. III
Women: basketball, cross country, golf, hockey, soccer, softball, tennis, track and field, volleyball.

Men: baseball, basketball, cross country, golf, hockey, soccer, tennis, track and field.
Nickname The Sabres
Mascot Sammy the Sabre
Website http://www.marianuniversity.edu
Dorcas Chapel
Administration Building

Marian University, formerly Marian College, was founded in 1936 by the Congregation of Sisters of Saint Agnes[1] and serves as a key educational institution in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.[2]

Overview[edit]

The Marian University community strives to challenge students academically while providing personal attention and one-on-one opportunities to ensure future success in the workforce or graduate school. During the 2013-14 academic year, Marian enrolled 2,180 undergraduate and graduate students.[2]

Students choose from more than 40 majors and participate in challenging on-the-job learning and research experiences.[3] The average class size is 14 students, with a 11:1 student to faculty ratio.

Marian's 78-acre campus[2] offers residence facilities for more than 500 students, including a traditional residence hall, suites, penthouses, townhouses, and apartments.[4] In addition, Marian offers adult undergraduate and graduate programs at several outreach sites, including Appleton and West Allis.[5]

History[edit]

Marian University opened as Marian College of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin on September 8, 1936, with 17 full-time and 25 part-time students, and eight faculty. The Sisters of St. Agnes founded the college in response to a Wisconsin Department of Instruction decision that nuns were not allowed to teach in public schools while wearing their religious habits.

Marian became accredited in elementary education in 1941. The first graduating class in August 1941 had eight nun graduates. The first lay students graduated in 1942. Marian had 86 full-time and 145 part-time students in 1950, who attended classes in a convent next to St. Agnes Hospital. Although founded as a women’s college, the superintendent of Fond du Lac schools attended art and music classes with his wife in 1940. Increasing enrollment caused the college to move to its current 100 acres (40 ha) campus in the mid 1960s, and the college became co-educational in 1970.

The school became accredited by the North Central Association for a Master's of Arts program in 1987, and was approved for a Ph.D. program in Leadership Studies in 2002.

On May 1, 2008, Marian College of Fond du Lac changed its name to Marian University to reflect an expansion of its programs and classes and to position the institution for continued growth.[6]

Marian University comprises four Schools: the School of Nursing and Health Professions; the School of Education; the School of Arts and Sciences; the School of Business and Public Safety.

Accreditation[edit]

Marian became affiliated with The Catholic University of America and the National Catholic Educational Association in 1949. It became accredited with the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools for teacher education in 1960.

Marian University is accredited by the North Central Association, International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education, National League for Nursing, Council on Social Work Education, National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. Marian’s curriculum has been approved by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Wisconsin State Board of Nursing, and certified by the Wisconsin Department of Justice Law Enforcement Standards Board Training and Standards Bureau.

Academic degrees[edit]

Marian University offers the B.A., B.S., BSN, BSW, BSBA, and B.S.Ed. undergraduate degrees. It also offers the M.S., M.A.E., MSN, and Ph.D. degrees.

Catholic environment[edit]

The Campus Ministry at Marian University provides many activities for students to deepen their understanding of the Catholic tradition: weekly Mass, retreats, sacraments, Scripture study, Rosary, adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, and outreach to the local area.

Publications[edit]

45 South is Marian University's literary magazine. The Sabre is its online newspaper.

Athletics[edit]

Marian University's athletic teams' nickname is the Sabres. Its colors are blue and white.

Students participate in sports at the NCAA Division III level in women’s basketball, golf, hockey, soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball, and men’s baseball, basketball, golf, hockey, soccer, and tennis. Teams have held membership in the Northern Athletics Conference since 2006, after holding membership in the Lake Michigan Conference from 1974 to 2006. Marian University's men's hockey team participates in the Midwest Collegiate Hockey Association. In fall 2009, the first Marian University women's hockey team took to the ice as members of the Northern Collegiate Hockey Association.

Notable alumni[edit]

  • Sr. Dianne Bergant, CSA, Ph.D. (1961) is an author and scripture scholar.[7]
  • Dr. Patrick G. Coy, Ph.D. (1979) is an author and scholar in the field of conflict resolution.[8]
  • Amy Sue Vruwink (1997) is a Democratic member of the Wisconsin State Assembly, representing the 70th District.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About: Sponsorship". Congregation of Sisters of St. Agnes. Congregation of Sisters of St. Agnes. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c "About Us: History". Marian University. Marian University of Wisconsin. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 
  3. ^ "Academic Programs: Majors (A-Z Listing)". Marian University. Marian University of Wisconsin. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 
  4. ^ "Student Life: Housing at Marian". Marian University. Marian University of Wisconsin. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 
  5. ^ "Locations". Marian University. Marian University of Wisconsin. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 
  6. ^ Marian College Becomes a University - The Business Journal of Milwaukee:
  7. ^ Sr. Dianne Bergant, CSA, Ph.D.
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 2011-2012,' Biographical Sketch of Amy Sue Vruwink, pg 67

External links[edit]