Marianne de Pierres

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Marianne de Pierres (photo by Amanda Greenslade, 2007)

Marianne de Pierres (born 1961) is an Australian science fiction author. Born in Western Australia, she did her undergraduate studies at Curtin University in Perth and later studied a Postgraduate Certificate of Arts in Writing, Editing and Publishing at the University of Queensland. She has been actively involved in promoting Speculative Fiction in Australia and is the co-founder of the Vision Writers Group, and ROR – wRiters on the Rise, a critiquing group for professional writers.[1] She was also involved in the early planning stage of Clarion South.

Publications[edit]

The greater body of her work has seen publication in the UK and Australia. In 2004, her series of novels with the protagonist Parrish Plessis,[2] a postapocalyptic bodyguard and bounty hunter, was published in the United Kingdom through Orbit Books and in 2005 in the United States through Roc Books. The novels in this series include Nylon Angel, Code Noir, and Crash Deluxe and have been adapted into a role-playing game.[3][4] Her second series, Sentients of Orion comprises four books: Dark Space, Chaos Space, Mirror Space and Transformation Space, published in the United Kingdom through Orbit Books.[5] Transformation Space won an Aurealis Award for Best SF novel in 2011.[6]

In 2008 de Pierres began writing humorous crime under the pseudonym Marianne Delacourt.[7] To date there are three novel novels in the "Tara Sharp" series; Sharp Shooter, Sharp Turn, Stage Fright. The first novel, Sharp Shooter received a Davitt Award in 2010 for Best Crime novel by an Australian woman.[8]

Her Young Adult series, Night Creatures (Burn Bright, Angel Arias and Shine Light) was published by Random House, Australia.[9] It featured a collaboration with Australian indie singer, Yunyu,[10] who wrote songs to accompany the release of first two books.

In 2014, Angry Robot Books published her Peacemaker urban fantasy, crime, Western series. The book has since been optioned for game adaptation by Stirfire Productions.[11]

Her complete bibliography is available from her website.

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Work Category Nomination
2003 Aurealis Award In The Bookshadow Best Fantasy Short Story Shortlist[12]
2005 Aurealis Award Nylon Angel Best Science Fiction Novel Shortlist[12]
2006 Aurealis Award Crash Deluxe Best Science Fiction Novel Shortlist[12]
2007 Aurealis Award Dark Space Best Science Fiction Novel Shortlist[12]
2007 Ditmar Award Dark Space Best Novel Shortlist[13]
2008 Aurealis Award Chaos Space Best Science Fiction Novel Shortlist[12]
2010 Aurealis Award Mirror Space Best Science Fiction Novel Shortlist[14]
2010 Aurealis Award Transformation Space Best Science Fiction Novel Won[6]

As Marianne Delacourt

Year Award Work Category Nomination
2009 Davitt Award Sharp Shooter Best Crime Novel Won[8]

External resources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yon, Mark (15 July 2007). "Interview with Marianne de Pierres". SFWorld. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  2. ^ "Brisbane authors' balancing act". 612 ABC Brisbane. 11 September 2007. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "About". Parrish Plessis series. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "Nylon Angel RPG". Marianne de Pierres. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "Sentients of Orion series". Marianne de Pierres. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "2010 Aurealis Award winners". Aurealis Awards. 21 May 2010. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  7. ^ "About". Marianne de Pierres. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Mangan, John (29 August 2010). "Hard slog punctuated with a little limelight". The Age. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  9. ^ Purdon, Fiona (2 March 2011). "Books: Dark fantasy burns brightly". The Courier-Mail. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  10. ^ http://www.burnbright.com.au/the-music/
  11. ^ http://www.mariannedepierres.com/peacemaker-makes-a-novel-game
  12. ^ a b c d e "Aurealis Awards Previous Years' Results". Aurealis Awards. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  13. ^ "2008 Ditmar Awards". Locus Magazine. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  14. ^ "2010 Aurealis Awards finalists announced". Aurealis Awards. 21 May 2010. Retrieved 27 June 2011.