Mariano Rumor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mariano Rumor
Mariano Rumor-1.jpg
39th
Prime Minister of Italy
In office
26 July 1973 – 23 November 1974
President Giovanni Leone
Preceded by Giulio Andreotti
Succeeded by Aldo Moro
In office
12 December 1968 – 6 August 1970
President Giuseppe Saragat
Preceded by Giovanni Leone
Succeeded by Emilio Colombo
Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
23 November 1974 – 29 July 1976
Prime Minister Aldo Moro
Preceded by Aldo Moro
Succeeded by Arnaldo Forlani
Italian Minister of the Interior
In office
17 February 1972 – 7 July 1973
Prime Minister Giulio Andreotti
Preceded by Franco Restivo
Succeeded by Paolo Emilio Taviani
In office
21 June 1963 – 4 December 1963
Prime Minister Giovanni Leone
Preceded by Paolo Emilio Taviani
Succeeded by Paolo Emilio Taviani
Italian Minister of Agriculture
In office
15 February 1959 – 21 June 1963
Prime Minister Antonio Segni
Fernando Tambroni
Amintore Fanfani
Preceded by Mario Ferrari Aggradi
Succeeded by Bernardo Mattarella
Personal details
Born (1915-06-16)16 June 1915
Vicenza, Veneto, Italy
Died 22 January 1990(1990-01-22) (aged 74)
Vicenza, Veneto, Italy
Nationality Italian
Political party Christian Democracy

Mariano Rumor (Italian pronunciation: [maˈrjaːno ruˈmoːr]; 16 June 1915 – 22 January 1990) was an Italian politician. A member of the Democrazia Cristiana, he served as Prime Minister of Italy from 1968 to 1970 and again from 1973 to 1974. During his periods as prime minister, a number of progressive reforms were carried out. A law of 11 December 1969 extended access to higher education to all students holding a higher secondary school diploma (formerly limited to students who came from classical (and in some cases, scientific) curricula. A law of 30 April 1969 introduced broad provisions covering pensions under the general scheme. The multiplying coefficient was increased to 1.85%, applied to average earnings of the best 3 years in the last 5 years of work (maximum pension, after 40 years of contribution: 74% of previous earnings). A social pension was also introduced for people over the age of 65 with low incomes and not eligible for any type of pension. In addition, cost of living indexation for all pensions (with the exception of social pensions) was introduced. A law of 2 February 1970 extended earnings replacement benefits to artisan undertakings in the construction industry. Under a law of 2 March 1974, the legal minimum for pensions was raised to 27.75% of the average industrial wage for 1973. A law of 16 July 1974 extended family allowances to INPS pensioners, in lieu of child supplements. A law of August 1974 extended hospital assistance to all those not previously covered by any scheme.[1]

He was born in Vicenza, Veneto. He graduated in Letters and was elected to the Constituent Assembly, which was opening the way for the new Italian Parliament of the Italian Republic, in 1946.

In 1973, Interior Minister Mariano Rumor was attacked by Gianfranco Bertoli, a self-described anarchist. Four were killed during the bombing, and 45 injured, while Rumor escaped alive from it. Bertoli was given a life-term in 1975. Bertoli was an informant of SIFAR at the time, and was, in the early 1990s, linked to Operation Gladio. Court proceedings later showed that this connection was one of mistaken identity.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Growth to Limits: The Western European Welfare States Since World War II Volume 4 edited by Peter Flora
  2. ^ "Neofascists cleared of 1973 bomb attack for second time". ANSA. 2004-12-01. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Mario Ferrari Aggradi
Italian Minister of Agriculture
1959–1963
Succeeded by
Bernardo Mattarella
Preceded by
Paolo Emilio Taviani
Italian Minister of the Interior
1963
Succeeded by
Paolo Emilio Taviani
Preceded by
Giovanni Leone
Prime Minister of Italy
1968–1970
Succeeded by
Emilio Colombo
Preceded by
Franco Restivo
Italian Minister of the Interior
1972–1973
Succeeded by
Paolo Emilio Taviani
Preceded by
Giulio Andreotti
Prime Minister of Italy
1973–1974
Succeeded by
Aldo Moro
Preceded by
Aldo Moro
Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs
1974–1976
Succeeded by
Arnaldo Forlani
Italian Chamber of Deputies
Preceded by
None, Parliament re-established
Member of Parliament for Verona
Legislatures: CA, I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII

1946 – 1979
Succeeded by
Title jointly held
Assembly seats
Preceded by
None, Parliament established
Member of European Parliament for Northeast Italy
Legislatures: I

1979 – 1984
Succeeded by
Title jointly held
Italian Senate
Preceded by
Title jointly held
Italian Senator for Veneto
Legislatures: VIII, IX, X

1979 – 1990
Succeeded by
Title jointly held
Party political offices
Preceded by
Aldo Moro
Secretary of the Italian Christian Democracy
1964-1969
Succeeded by
Flaminio Piccoli