Maricopa, California

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City of Maricopa
City
Northern city limit of Maricopa; the fire in the center is a gas flare from an active oil well
Northern city limit of Maricopa; the fire in the center is a gas flare from an active oil well
Location in Kern County and the state of California
Location in Kern County and the state of California
Coordinates: 35°03′32″N 119°24′03″W / 35.05889°N 119.40083°W / 35.05889; -119.40083Coordinates: 35°03′32″N 119°24′03″W / 35.05889°N 119.40083°W / 35.05889; -119.40083
Country  United States
State  California
County Kern
Incorporated July 25, 1911[1]
Government
 • State Senator Andy Vidak (R)[2]
 • State Assembly Shannon Grove (R)[3]
 • U. S. Congress Kevin McCarthy (R)[4]
Area[5]
 • Total 1.502 sq mi (3.890 km2)
 • Land 1.502 sq mi (3.890 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[6] 883 ft (269 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,154
 • Density 770/sq mi (300/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 93252
Area code(s) 661
FIPS code 06-45736
GNIS feature IDs 1652749, 2411033
Old Maricopa Jail House. Served as a "drunk tank" from the 1910s to the 1960s.

Maricopa is a city in Kern County, California. Maricopa is located 6.5 miles (10 km) south-southeast of Taft,[7] at an elevation of 883 feet (269 m).[6] The population was 1,154 at the 2010 census, up from 1,111 at the 2000 census. Maricopa lies at the junction of Route 166 and Route 33. The Carrizo Plain is located to the northwest, and the enormous Midway-Sunset Oil Field, the third largest oil field in the United States, is adjacent on the north and east.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.9 km2), all of it land. Maricopa is in the extreme southwestern corner of the San Joaquin Valley, on the first rise of land into the foothills of the Coast Ranges, with the Temblor Mountains, following the San Andreas Fault, trending northwest of town, and the San Emigdio Mountains to the southeast. The climate of the area is hot and semi-arid, with summertime temperatures routinely exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Freezes occur in the winter, with the mean period without freezes being about 275 days. About six inches of rain falls annually in Maricopa.[8]

History[edit]

The first post office opened in 1901.[7] Maricopa incorporated in 1911.[7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 1,121
1930 1,071 −4.5%
1940 670 −37.4%
1950 800 19.4%
1960 648 −19.0%
1970 740 14.2%
1980 946 27.8%
1990 1,193 26.1%
2000 1,111 −6.9%
2010 1,154 3.9%
Est. 2012 1,163 [9] 0.8%
US Census[10]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[11] reported that Maricopa had a population of 1,154. The population density was 768.4 people per square mile (296.7/km²). The racial makeup of Maricopa was 958 (83.0%) White, 1 (0.1%) African American, 27 (2.3%) Native American, 16 (1.4%) Asian, 2 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 112 (9.7%) from other races, and 38 (3.3%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 232 persons (20.1%).

The Census reported that 1,154 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 0 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 414 households, out of which 157 (37.9%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 191 (46.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 66 (15.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 34 (8.2%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 50 (12.1%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 2 (0.5%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 91 households (22.0%) were made up of individuals and 33 (8.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79. There were 291 families (70.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.20.

The population was spread out with 306 people (26.5%) under the age of 18, 112 people (9.7%) aged 18 to 24, 252 people (21.8%) aged 25 to 44, 349 people (30.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 135 people (11.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.4 years. For every 100 females there were 101.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.4 males.

There were 466 housing units at an average density of 310.3 per square mile (119.8/km²), of which 268 (64.7%) were owner-occupied, and 146 (35.3%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.8%; the rental vacancy rate was 9.8%. 704 people (61.0% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 450 people (39.0%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 1,111 people, 404 households, and 302 families residing in the city. The population density was 739.7 people per square mile (286.0/km²). There were 460 housing units at an average density of 306.3 per square mile (118.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 85.87% White, 1.98% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 8.91% from other races, and 2.79% from two or more races. 13.50% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 404 households out of which 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.2% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.8% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 26.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 111.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $27,917, and the median income for a family was $31,761. Males had a median income of $31,161 versus $23,333 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,692. About 15.6% of families and 21.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.2% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.

Public safety[edit]

Maricopa Fire Department was established in 1910 with Chief F. W. Ball serving as the first fire chief. Maricopa Hospital opened on 22 April 1911 and the city was incorporated on July 25, 1911. Gary Biggerstaff was the chief of police when budget problems forced the city to close its police department in 1998. The Kern County Sheriff's Department provided police services to the citizens of Maricopa from 1998 until 2006 when the city reopened its police department in the old building.

As reported in the Los Angeles Times on July 4, 2011, the Maricopa Police Department has become embroiled in a local controversy playing out through large signs posted on the city's main thoroughfare. The police have been accused of racial profiling and "over-enforcement" regarding traffic violations and frequent towing of vehicles driven by drivers without proof of insurance or with license or license plate infractions. In mid-2011, American Civil Liberties Union lawyer Jennie Pasquarella is quoted as saying, "Maricopa has been a shining example of impoundments gone wrong," and "They're essentially creating a racket to steal people's cars." [13]

Police Chief Derek Merritt and other city officials have denied the charges.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  4. ^ "California's 23rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ U.S. Census
  6. ^ a b "Maricopa". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  7. ^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 1068. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  8. ^ "Ecoregion description". U.S. Forest Service. Archived from the original on 2005-03-11. Retrieved 2014-02-22. 
  9. ^ E-1 Population Estimates for Cities, Counties and the State. California Department of Finance. January 1, 2011 and 2012. Accessed: 05-03-2012.
  10. ^ Historical Census Populations of Counties and Incorporated Cities in California, 1850–2010. California Department of Finance. Accessed: 03-12-2012.
  11. ^ All data are derived from the United States Census Bureau reports from the 2010 United States Census, and are accessible on-line here. The data on unmarried partnerships and same-sex married couples are from the Census report DEC_10_SF1_PCT15. All other housing and population data are from Census report DEC_10_DP_DPDP1. Both reports are viewable online or downloadable in a zip file containing a comma-delimited data file. The area data, from which densities are calculated, are available on-line here. Percentage totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. The Census Bureau defines families as a household containing one or more people related to the householder by birth, opposite-sex marriage, or adoption. People living in group quarters are tabulated by the Census Bureau as neither owners nor renters. For further details, see the text files accompanying the data files containing the Census reports mentioned above.
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-adv-maricopa-20110704,0,7126125.story