Marie Corridon

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Marie Corridon
Personal information
Full name Marie Louise Corridon
Nationality  United States
Born (1930-02-05)February 5, 1930
Washington, D.C.
Died May 26, 2010(2010-05-26) (aged 80)
Norwalk, Connecticut
Sport
Sport Swimming
Stroke(s) Freestyle
Club Women's Swimming Association

Marie Louise Corridon Mortell (February 5, 1930 – May 26, 2010), née Marie Louise Corridon, was an American competition swimmer and Olympic champion.

Corridon was born in Washington, D.C., but moved with her family to Norwalk, Connecticut, when her father started his medical practice there. She attended Sacred Heart Academy in Stamford, Connecticut. She learned to swim at the age of 5, and demonstrated a natural ability as a swimmer. She was the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) national champion in the 100-yard freestyle in 1948, and set a new U.S. record in the event. She won the 100-yard freestyle national championship again in 1950.[1]

Corridon competed at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London, England, where she won a gold medal as the lead-off swimmer of the first-place U.S. team in the women's 4×100-meter freestyle relay. Corridon, together with her teammates Thelma Kalama, Brenda Helser and Ann Curtis, set a new Olympic record in the event final. Individually, she also competed in the women's 100-meter freestyle, but did not advance to the final.[2]

After the Olympics, Corridon attended Marymount Manhattan College. She also worked for Avery Brundage, the long-time head of the United States Olympic Committee.[1]

Corridon married William Edward Mortell, and together they had seven children. She died in Norwalk, Connecticut on May 26, 2010; she was 80 years old.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Marie Corridon Mortell," Westport News (May 28, 2010). Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  2. ^ Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Athletes, Marie Corridon. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  3. ^ Tom Renner, "Norwalk Mourns Olympian's Death," Norwalk Daily Voice (May 28, 2010). Retrieved October 4, 2012.

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