Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin

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Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin
Mrs. Marie L. Baldwin (LOC) 2.jpg
Marie L. Baldwin
Born 1863
Died 1952
Nationality American
Ethnicity Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, Métis
Occupation Attorney, accountant, linguist
Employer United States Bureau of Indian Affairs, Education Division
Known for First Native American student and first woman of color to graduate from the Washington College of Law
Parents John (Jean Baptiste) Bottineau, Marguerite Renville (b. Jan. 13, 1842 at Pembina)
Relatives Grandparents, Pierre Bottineau and Genevieve "Jennie" LaRence, b. 1818, François Renville and Marguerite Dumas Belgarde; sisters, Lillian, b. 1867 and Alvina Clement, b. 1868

Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin (1863-1952), was a Métis Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Attorney. In 1914 Baldwin was the first Native American student to graduate from the Washington College of Law. She worked in the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs, and was an officer in the Society of American Indians.[1] "Her appointment [to the Bureau] ... was approved by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1904. She was an accountant in the Education Division of the Bureau."[2]

Her grandparents were Pierre Bottineau and Genevieve "Jennie" LaRence, b. 1818; her father was John Bottineau.[3]

"Marie Louise was admitted to the bar in 1914, having completed the three years of courses during two years of attending evening classes. She also graduated with highest distinction. The Quarterly Journal of American Indians noted that “Mrs. Baldwin, who is Treasurer of the Society of American Indians, has offered herself to the War Department for services overseas. She speaks French as fluently as English, and her skill as an accountant will make her valuable to the accounting staff.”[2]

Legacy[edit]

A Marie Bottineau Baldwin Scholarship was established by the Washington College of Law student organization.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Houghton, Louise Seymour. 1918. Our debt to the red man; the French-Indians in the development of the United States. Boston: The Stratford company.
  2. ^ a b c Barkwell, Lawrence. "Marie Bottineau Baldwin". Louis Riel Institute. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  3. ^ "Pierre Bottineau". History of Red Lake County. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 

External links[edit]