Marika Humphreys

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Marika Humphreys
Personal information
Alternative names Marika Humphreys-Baranova
Country represented Great Britain
Born (1977-01-03) 3 January 1977 (age 37)
Chester, England
Home town Deeside, Wales
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Former partner Vitaliy Baranov
Philip Askew
Justin Lanning
Former coach Natalia Dubova
Roy Callaway
Betty Callaway
Jimmy Young
Former choreographer Marika Humphreys
Skating club Deeside Ice Skating Club
Began skating 1983
Retired 2004

Marika Humphreys-Baranova (born 3 January 1977) is a British former competitive ice dancer. With partner and husband Vitaliy Baranov, she is the 2002 Karl Schäfer Memorial champion, 2001 Finlandia Trophy silver medalist, 2000 Nebelhorn Trophy bronze medalist, and a two-time British national champion. They competed at the Olympics, World Championships, and European Championships. Earlier in her career, Humphreys won three national titles with Philip Askew and Justin Lanning.

Career[edit]

Aged 15 with her first partner, Justin Lanning, Marika Humphreys was the youngest skater ever to win the gold medal at the 1993 British Championships.[1] She then teamed up with Philip Askew to win the 1996 and 1997 British titles. In 1998, she teamed up with Ukrainian ice dancer Vitaliy Baranov.[2] They won the 2001 and 2002 British national titles. Humphreys and Baranov placed 15th at the 2002 Olympics, 14th at the 2002 World Championships, and 11th at the 2002 European Championships. They also competed in three Grand Prix events, and won five medals at senior B events including gold at the 2002 Karl Schäfer Memorial.

Humphreys-Baranova is a Technical Specialist for the International Skating Union.[3] She served as the ice dancing Technical Specialist at the 2010 Olympics,[3][4] the European Championships in Warsaw 2007,[5] and as the ice dancing Assistant Technical Specialist at the 2008[6] and 2006[7] World Figure Skating Championships. She also trains new Technical Specialists for the ISU.

Marika coached at Deeside ice rink between 1996 and 2013. In April 2013 she was head-hunted for the role of Elite Skating Coordinator for the Lee Valley Ice Centre in London.

Personal life[edit]

Humphreys and Baranov were married in March 1999.[2] In 2009, Humphreys-Baranova graduated from Glyndwr University with an Honours Degree in Sports and Exercise Sciences.[1]

Results[edit]

With Baranov[edit]

Results[2]
International
Event 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04
Winter Olympics 15th
World Championships 16th 14th
European Championships 12th 11th
GP Cup of Russia 7th
GP NHK Trophy 6th WD
GP Skate Canada WD
GP Trophée Lalique 8th
Finlandia Trophy 3rd 2nd
Golden Spin of Zagreb 3rd
Karl Schäfer Memorial 1st
Nebelhorn Trophy 3rd
National
British Championships 3rd 1st 1st 3rd
GP = Grand Prix; WD = Withdrew

With Askew[edit]

International
Event 1995–1996 1996–1997 1997–1998
World Championships 17th 16th
European Championships 11th 15th
CS Nations Cup 8th
CS Skate Canada 9th
Karl Schäfer Memorial 5th
Lysiane Lauret 3rd
National
British Championships 1st 1st
CS = Champions Series

With Lanning[edit]

International
Event 1992–1993 1993–1994
World Championships 17th 16th
European Championships 12th
Piruetten 6th
National
British Championships 1st 2nd

Programs[edit]

(with Baranov)

Season Original dance Free dance
2003–2004[2]
  • Hey Pachuco
  • Swing Lovor
  • Hey Pachuco
  • Sirocco
    by Momo and Christophe Goze
  • Sahara
    arranged by Haylie Ecker and Brian Gascoigne
    performed by Bond

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Goodban, Dave (11 February 2010). "Flintshire skater Marika Humphreys makes Winter Olympics return". Chester Chronicle. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Marika HUMPHREYS / Vitali BARANOV: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 27 October 2004. 
  3. ^ a b ISU Communication No. 1467 PDF
  4. ^ "2010 Winter Olympics". International Skating Union. 
  5. ^ "2007 European Championships". International Skating Union. 
  6. ^ "2008 World Championships". International Skating Union. 
  7. ^ "2006 World Championships". International Skating Union. 

External links[edit]