Marilyn E. Jacox

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Marilyn E. Jacox
Born c. 1929
Utica, New York, U.S.
Died October 30, 2013
Nationality United States
Notable awards E. Bright Wilson Award in Spectroscopy
Ellis R. Lippincott Award
Federal Woman's Award
George C. Pimentel Award
Samuel Wesley Stratton Award
U. S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award
Utica College Outstanding Alumnus Award
Washington Academy of Sciences Award
WISE Lifetime Achievement Award

Marilyn E. Jacox (c. 1929 – October 30, 2013) was an American physicist. She was an National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Fellow and Scientist Emeritus in the Sensor Science Division.[1] She was born in Utica, New York.[2]

Career[edit]

Dr. Jacox received an Utica College Outstanding Alumnus Award in 1963 and five years later was awarded the Washington Academy of Sciences Award in Physical Sciences.[citation needed] In 1970 she was awarded U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award for her distinguished service. In 1973 she received the Federal Woman's Award and the Samuel Wesley Stratton Award which she got from National Bureau of Standards.[citation needed]

She was a member of the Inter−American Photochemical Society from 1978-79 on the Executive Committee level, and was an Election Committee member by 1980. In 1987 she received the 40 Alumni of Achievement Award from Utica College.[citation needed] She was a member of Sigma Xi as President Elect from 1987−88, and as President from 1988-89. The same year she was awarded Ellis R. Lippincott Award. In 2003, she was awarded the E. Bright Wilson Award in Spectroscopy by American Chemical Society and from 2005-09 was a member. In the same year, she was awarded George C. Pimentel Award for her Advances in Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy.[citation needed]

Dr. Jacox was a Fellow of both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society. She was a reviewer for Chemical Intermediates from 1984−89, and for Journal of Chemical Physics from 1989-91. In 2007 she received another award and again from the Washington Academy of Sciences, for Distinguished Career in Science.[3]

Death[edit]

She died, after a brief illness, on October 30, 2013, aged 84.[1] She lived in Montgomery Village, Maryland.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MARILYN JACOX's Obituary by The Washington Post". Legacy.com. October 30, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Place of birth". Bio-medicine. Retrieved June 17, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Biography of Dr. Marilyn Jacox". National Institute of Standards and Technology. Retrieved June 15, 2013.