Marion Crecco

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Marion Crecco is an American Republican Party politician, who served in the New Jersey General Assembly from 1986 to 2002, where she represented the 30th Legislative District (1986–1992) and then the 34th Legislative District (1992–2002) following redistricting in the wake of the 1990 United States Census.

A resident of Bloomfield, Crecco attended Seton Hall University, majoring in Marketing and Montclair State College, where she majored in Liberal Arts. She worked professionally as President and Accounting Executive of Marion Crecco Associates. She served as a delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1984, 1988 and 1996.[1]

Crecco was first elected to the General Assembly in 1985 and was re-elected in 1987 and 1989 in the 30th Legislative District, serving alongside fellow Republican John V. Kelly for all three terms.[2] After redistricting following the 1990 Census, Crecco won election in the 34th Legislative District in 1991, 1993, 1995, 1997 and 1999, serving together with Republican Gerald H. Zecker for all five terms in that district.[3][4] Following 2001 redistricting, she ran for the New Jersey Senate in 2001 to represent the 28th District, losing to Democrat Ronald Rice by a 69.4%-29.6% margin.[5] She served in the Assembly as Vice-Chair of the Assembly Advisory Council on Women, as Assistant Majority Leader from 1992 to 1995, as Assistant Majority Whip from 1986 to 1989 as Chair of the Law and Public Safety Committee and on the Transportation Committee.[1]

In 1988, Crecco proposed legislation in the Assembly to require schools to teach abstinence as the only reliable means of preventing the spread of AIDS, stating that without this approach "we are allowing our children to play Russian roulette".[6] Building on an experience in which she was unable to connect with her niece following her sister's death, Crecco introduced legislation in September 1996 that would grant aunts and uncles visitation rights, in addition to the grandparents and siblings already covered for unsupervised visitations under previous law passed in 1993.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Assemblywoman Marion Crecco, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 25, 1998. Accessed June 2, 2010.
  2. ^ NJ Assembly 30 - History, OurCampaigns.com. accessed June 2, 2010.
  3. ^ NJ Assembly 34 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 2, 2010.
  4. ^ Marion Crecco, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 2, 2010.
  5. ^ NJ State Senate 28, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed June 2, 2010.
  6. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "Teaching of Sexual Abstinence Urged", The New York Times, November 20, 1988. Accessed June 2, 2010.
  7. ^ DeMasters, Karen. "A Loss in the Family Led to a Bill on Visiting", The New York Times, September 22, 1996. Accessed June 2, 2010.