Marion Hammer

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Marion P. Hammer was the first female President of the National Rifle Association.[1]

Biography[edit]

Hammer served as President of the NRA from 1995 to 1998 and remains on the NRA Board of Directors. Hammer has been the NRA's lobbyist in Tallahassee for more than three decades. She is credited with an intense three-year push for a controversial bill that prevents employers from firing employees for having a firearm in their personal vehicle while parked on company property.[2]

She was nominated by Florida's former Attorney General and later Governor Charlie Crist for the state's Florida Women's Hall of Fame, and has been chosen as one of ten finalists by the Florida Commission on the Status of Women. She was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005.[3]

Charlie Crist stated that: "Marion Hammer has long proven herself to be a worthy recipient of appointment to the Florida Women's Hall of Fame." "Throughout her career she has diligently and uncompromisingly pursued issues that are beneficial to women and their families, as well as her community, her state and her nation."[3]

As NRA Executive Vice President, Wayne LaPierre stated: "I have had the great fortune to know Marion for a quarter of a century and to have worked closely with her, especially during her historic term as the first woman President in the National Rifle Association's long history. I have always sought and valued her counsel, not only because of her legislative and political acumen, but more importantly, because of her rock-solid integrity. I concur 100% with Florida Governor Jeb Bush (R), who stated of Marion: 'When she says it, you know she means it, and you know her word is golden.'"[4]

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