Mark Amin

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Mark Amin
Born Mohammed Mark Amin Sobini
(1950-02-19) February 19, 1950 (age 64)
Rafsanjan, Iran
Nationality Iranian American
Alma mater Graduate School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles (MBA),
University of Kansas (B.A.)
Occupation Film producer and writer

Mohammed Mark Amin Sobini (born February 19, 1950), known professionally as Mark Amin, is an Iranian American motion picture producer, distributor and writer who has been working in independent and mainstream cinema for more than two decades. Some of Amin’s film credits include The Prince and Me (2004), starring Julia Stiles, 1997’s Eve's Bayou, starring Samuel L. Jackson, and 2002’s Frida, a biopic which Amin executive produced.[1]

Most recently, Amin served as producer for the Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions film Girl Most Likely (2012), starring Annette Benning and Matt Dillon, as well as producer for Eliza Graves (2014), starring Kate Beckinsale, Jim Sturgess, Ben Kingsley and Michael Caine.

Besides his career as a film producer, Amin has also been active in other business and investment interests. Amin is an investor and member of the advisory board of EdgeCast,[2] a content delivery firm which sold in 2013 to Verizon for $400 million.[3] He is also chairman and major shareholder of gymra.com, the fitness website. Additionally, Amin is active in the development of almond and pistachio orchards in central California.[4]

Early life and education[edit]

Amin is originally from Rafsanjan, a small town in Iran. Raised in a family that was in the pistachio trading business,[5] in 1967, Amin immigrated to the United States to study, and finished out his last year of high school in Colorado.[6]

In 1972, Amin graduated from the University of Kansas with a degree in economics. After earning his bachelor's degree, Amin attended New York University's business school for one semester. However, New York City proved too overwhelming and Amin transferred to the Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles.[7] Amin graduated from the management school with a Masters of Business Administration in Marketing in 1975.[8]

In 1997, Amin donated $25,000 to the University of Kansas to start a scholarship for those students studying film at the school.[4][9]

Career[edit]

Before film career[edit]

After graduating from management school, Amin worked for Western Gear, a construction machinery firm, and returned to Iran as the company's representative.[7]

In 1979, political and military conflict arose in Iran. As a result, Amin fled to Europe and then returned to Los Angeles. Following his return, Amin became involved in a number of businesses, including real estate, petrochemicals and commodities.[7]

Early career and founding of Vidmark Entertainment[edit]

Amin’s career in the film industry started in the early 1980s through his involvement with a chain of video stores in Los Angeles known as 20/20 Video.[6] In 1981, Amin formed Vidmark Entertainment, an "aggressive independent supplier" [10] of video releases operating in the early era of home video entertainment. It was with the financial success of Vidmark’s Demonwarp, an independent film shot on 35 mm on a budget of only $250,000, that inspired Amin to further expand his efforts as an executive producer.

Founding of Trimark Pictures[edit]

With an initial investment of $270,000,[6] Amin co-founded Trimark Holdings, a company which would include among its subsidiaries, Trimark Pictures, Trimark Television and Trimark Interactive.[10] Amin served as Chairman and CEO of the newly formed company.[11] Trimark Pictures went on to release such titles as Warlock (1988), The Dentist (1996) and the Leprechaun franchise (the first of which starred a young Jennifer Aniston).

In 2000, Trimark merged with Lions Gate Entertainment in a move that made Amin Lionsgate’s single largest shareholder, as well as its Vice Chairman.[1] During Amin’s nine-year tenure as Vice Chairman of Lionsgate, the company’s revenue grow from $184 million to $1.2 billion. The production company also produced and distributed film releases that included Monster’s Ball (2001), starring Halle Barry, which earned her a Best Actress Academy Award, and Best Picture Academy Award-winner, Crash (2004).

During this time, Amin also became Chairman of CinemaNow, an online independent film distributor.[12]

Founding of Sobini Films[edit]

In 2001, Amin founded Sobini Films, a production company focused on producing specialized and mainstream commercial films. Since its founding, Sobini Films has produced a number of films, including Streets of Legend (2003), a Sundance award winner, and An American Girl: Chrissa Stands Strong (2009). Sobini Films has several upcoming projects in various stages of production, including A Moment to Remember and Zorro: Reborn.

Controversy over DuPont Fabros Technology Inc. Stock[edit]

In 2012, the SEC alleged that Mark Amin learned confidential information about expanding business opportunities for DuPont Fabros Technology Inc., which develops and manages facilities that maintain large computer servers for technology companies. It was alleged that Amin tipped his brother, Robert Reza Amin, and cousin, Michael Mahmood Amin, with this confidential information. The three allegedly illegally traded on the basis of that inside information and allegedly gained profits from this insider trading. Mark Amin and five others agreed to settle the SEC’s charges by collectively paying nearly $2 million.[13]

Personal life[edit]

Philanthropic efforts and contributions[edit]

In 2000, Amin and his brother, Reza Amin, formed the Bijan and Soraya Amin Foundation, which has helped support organizations that include the National Ability Center, the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, the University Muslim Medical Association.[14]

Amin is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Farhang Foundation, an organization which promotes the study and research of Iranian art and culture.[15]

Recognition[edit]

In 2010, Amin earned an Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award from his alma mater, the University of Kansas.[16]

Filmography[edit]

Theatrical releases[edit]

Year Film Producer Writer Other Notes
1988 Demonwarp Yes executive producer
1990 The Sleeping Car Yes executive producer
Farendj Yes executive producer
Mob Boss Yes executive producer
1991 Black Magic Woman Yes executive producer
Servants of Twilight Yes executive producer
Whore Yes executive producer
1992 Into the Sun Yes executive producer
1993 Leprechaun Yes executive producer
Interceptor Yes executive producer
Extreme Justice Yes executive producer
Deadfall Yes executive producer
Philadelphia Experiment II Yes executive producer
1994 Dangerous Touch Yes executive producer
Final Mission Yes executive producer
Leprechaun 2 Yes executive producer
A Million to Juan Yes executive producer
Love and a .45 Yes executive producer
Curse of the Starving Class Yes executive producer
The Stöned Age Yes executive producer
1995 Night of the Running Man Yes executive producer
Evolver Yes executive producer
Aurora: Operation Intercept Yes executive producer
Frank & Jesse Yes executive producer
Leprechaun 3 Yes executive producer
Separate Lives Yes
True Crime Yes executive producer
A Kid in King Arthur's Court Yes executive producer
Kicking and Screaming Yes executive producer
Iron Eagle IV Yes executive producer
1996 Leprechaun 4: In Space Yes executive producer
Crossworlds Yes executive producer
Underworld Yes executive producer
The Dentist Yes executive producer
Two Guys Talkin' About Girls Yes executive producer
The Maddening Yes executive producer
Sometimes They Come Back ... Again Yes executive producer
Never Ever Yes executive producer
Pinocchio's Revenge Yes executive producer
1997 Sprung Yes executive producer
Eve's Bayou Yes executive producer
Trucks Yes executive producer, TV movie
A Kid in Aladdin's Palace Yes executive producer
Star Kid Yes executive producer
1998 Standoff Yes executive producer
Bay Watch: White Thunder at Glacier Bay Yes Yes co-producer
Chairman of the Board Yes executive producer
The Dentist 2 Yes executive producer
Carnival of Souls Yes executive producer
Ground Control Yes executive producer
Trance Yes
Ava's Magical Adventure Yes executive producer
1999 Let the Devil Wear Black Yes executive producer
King Cobra Yes executive producer
Diplomatic Siege Yes Yes executive producer, screenplay and story writer
The Simple Life of Noah Dearborn Yes executive producer, TV movie
Warlock III: The End of Innocence Yes executive producer
Turbulence 2: Fear of Flying Yes executive producer
Held Up Yes executive producer
2000 Cord Yes executive producer
Skipped Parts Yes executive producer
The Bogus Witch Project Yes executive producer, TV movie
Attraction Yes executive producer
Blood Surf Yes executive producer
2001 Xchange Yes executive producer
After the Storm Yes executive producer, TV movie
2002 Framed Yes executive producer, TV movie
Frida Yes executive producer
2003 Quattro Noza Yes executive producer
2004 The Prince and Me Yes Yes Yes story writer
2006 The Prince & Me 2: The Royal Weddings Yes Yes characters
Peaceful Warrior Yes
2008 Gardens of the Night Yes executive producer
The Prince & Me 3: A Royal Honeymoon Yes executive producer
2009 An American Girl: Chrissa Stands Strong Yes Yes executive producer
2010 Burning Bright Yes
2011 Jujitsuing Reality Yes Documentary short
2012 Girl Most Likely Yes
2013 Sexy Evil Genius Yes
Filth Yes
2014 Stonehearst Asylum Yes
I Live For You Yes

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Acuna, Kirsten. "Former VC Of Lionsgate Charged With Insider Trading". May 8, 2012. Business Insider. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  2. ^ Bond, Paul. "Dis fund invests in EdgeCast". December 10, 2007. The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  3. ^ Rubin, Ben Fox (December 9, 2013). "Verizon to Acquire Content-Delivery Startup EdgeCast Networks". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b Silver, Diane (May 9, 1997). "Entertainment Executive Donates $25,000 For New Scholarship". The University of Kansas Office of University Relations. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Mark Amin". Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c Niccum, Jon. "Jon Niccum Interviews Mark Amin". Lawrence Journal-World. 
  7. ^ a b c Biles, Jan. "Movie Producer Hits Stride". November 22, 1997. Lawrence Journal World. Retrieved January 25, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Mark Amin". The New York Times. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  9. ^ "KU students receive honors". May 20, 2001. Lawrence Journal World. Retrieved January 25, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b Lerman, Laurence. "Invasion of the indie home vid". 
  11. ^ Carver, Benedict. "Trimark on Mark". November 15, 1998. Variety. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  12. ^ Swanson, Tim. "CinemaNow gets MS, B’bust, Kipco for coin". December 3, 2000. Variety. Retrieved January 26, 2014. 
  13. ^ https://www.sec.gov/News/PressRelease/Detail/PressRelease/1365171488936#.UoKUjpTk9ho
  14. ^ "News and Events". Pepperdine University. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Announcing 6th Annual Farhang Foundation Short Film Festival Celebrating Iranian Heritage". Payvand Iran News. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Four KU College of Liberal Arts and Sciences alumni earn Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award". Lawrence Journal World. December 25, 2010. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 

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