Mark David Hall

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mark David Hall
Born (1966-02-22) February 22, 1966 (age 48)
Fields Politics
Institutions George Fox University
Alma mater University of Virginia
Website
profile_page
Great Seal of the United States (obverse).svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the United States

Mark David Hall (born 22 February 1966),[1] is Herbert Hoover Distinguished Professor of Politics at George Fox University, and the author of a number of books on religion and politics in American life. The majority of his research has been in religion in the American founding era. He is also the current President of Christians in Political Science.

Education[edit]

In 1988, Hall received a BA in Political Science from Wheaton College (Illinois) and in 1993 received his PhD in government from University of Virginia.

Early career[edit]

Prior to his 2001 hiring at George Fox University, he taught from 1993-2001 at East Central University, first as an Assistant and then an Associate Professor.[2] He has served as Herbert Hoover Distinguished Professor of Politics at George Fox since 2005. His primary teaching fields are political theory, constitutional law, and religion and politics in America.[3]

Later career[edit]

Hall’s scholarly work is focused on issues of religion in the American founding era. In particular, his writing is often concerned with dispelling misconceptions that the Founders were deists who desired the strict separation of church and state. Instead, he argues that there are good reasons to believe many Founders were influenced by orthodox Christianity and that virtually none of them favored anything approximating a contemporary understanding of the separation of church and state. See, for instance, his 2010 lecture at the Heritage Foundation that was covered by C-Span.[4] Hall demonstrates that these distortions are of more than scholarly interest, arguing that they have had a profound impact how the Supreme Court has interpreted the religion clauses of the First Amendment.[5]

Selected bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Hall, Mark (1997). The political and legal philosophy of James Wilson, 1742-1798. Columbia: University of Missouri Press. ISBN 9780826211033. 
  • Hall, Mark D.; Dreisbach, Daniel L.; Morrison, Jeffry H. (2004). The founders on God and government. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. ISBN 9780742522794. 
  • Hall, Mark D. (editor); Hall, Kermit L. (editor); Wilson, James (author) (2007). Collected Works of James Wilson, 2 Vols. Indianapolis, Indiana: Liberty Fund Press. 
  • Hall, Mark D.; Dreisbach, Daniel L. (2009). The sacred rights of conscience: selected readings on religious liberty and church-state relations in the American founding. Indianapolis, Indiana: Liberty Fund Press. ISBN 9780865977150. 
  • Hall, Mark D.; Dreisbach, Daniel L.; Morrison, Jeffry H. (2009). The forgotten founders on religion and public life. Notre Dame, Indianapolis: University of Notre Dame Press. ISBN 9780268026028. 
  • Hall, Mark D.; Gregg II, Gary L. (2012). America's forgotten founders (2nd ed.). Wilmington, Delaware: ISI Books. ISBN 9781610170239. 
  • Hall, Mark D. (2013). Roger Sherman and the creation of the American republic. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199929849. 
  • Hall, Mark D. (2013). Roger Sherman and the creation of the American republic. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199929849.  Also available online at: Hall, Mark D. (2012). "Roger Sherman and the creation of the American republic". Oxford Scholarship Online (Oxford University Press). doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199929849.001.0001. 

Journal articles[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hall, Mark David, 1966-". Library of Congress. Retrieved 14 July 2014. "CIP t.p. (Mark David Hall) data sheet (b. 2-22-1966)" 
  2. ^ "Hall, Mark David: curriculum vitae". George Fox University. 
  3. ^ "Profile page: Mark Hall". George Fox University. 
  4. ^ Hall, Mark D. "Did America have a christian founding? (video lecture)". 
  5. ^ Hall, Mark D. (2006). "Jeffersonian walls and Madisonian lines: the Supreme Court's use of history in religion clause cases". Oregon Law Review (University of Oregon) 85 (2): 563–614.  Pdf.

External links[edit]