Mark Everett (athlete)

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Mark Everett
Personal information
Full name David Mark Everett
Nationality  United States
Born (1968-09-02) September 2, 1968 (age 46)
Milton, Florida
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight 154 lb (70 kg)
Sport
Sport Track and field
Event(s) 800 meters
College team Florida
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s) 800 metres: 1:43.20[1]

David Mark Everett (born September 2, 1968) is an American retired middle-distance runner who won the bronze medal in the 800-meter event at the 1991 World Championships in Tokyo. The following year, Everett finished second in the US Olympic Trials in New Orleans behind Johnny Gray. A few weeks later Everett beat Gray at the Bislett Games in Oslo, setting a new personal best of 1:43.40. Everett and Gray went to Barcelona as favorites for the gold and silver medals. However, Everett did not finish the race and Gray won the Olympic bronze behind William Tanui and Nixon Kiprotich.

Throughout his career, Everett was known for his finishing speed, a kicker, usually coming from behind on the final straightaway. His right arm was flailing awkwardly, some said it made his body look like it was twisting.[2][3] Dwight Stones reported it was from a broken arm as a child.

Everett is the former head coach of the track and field team at Birmingham-Southern College in Birmingham, Alabama.

Running career[edit]

Collegiate[edit]

Everett was born in Milton, Florida. He attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he ran for the Florida Gators track and field team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition. He graduated from Florida with a bachelor's degree in exercise and sports science in 1992, and was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a "Gator Great" in 2001.[4][5]

Post-collegiate[edit]

One of his last achievements was a 4x400-meter relay gold medal at the 1997 IAAF World Indoor Championships. Everett also ran in the men's 800 meter race at the 2000 Summer Olympics, although he did not qualify to the final round, recording a time of 1:49.77.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]