Mark Fritz

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Mark Fritz is a war correspondent and author. A native of Detroit and graduate of Wayne State University,[1] he won a Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1995 for his stories concerning the Rwandan Genocide.

Journalism career[edit]

As a staff writer for the Associated Press (AP), from 1984-1997, and again in 2003, Fritz reported on the reunification of Germany, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Rwanda, Somalia, Chechnya, and Liberia, among others. As an AP editor on the Foreign Desk, he filed the first U.S. bulletin on the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989. He subsequently was named East Berlin correspondent, then West Africa bureau chief. Fritz also served a stint on the agency's computer-assisted investigative reporting team and as roving foreign correspondent for the International Desk in New York. He subsequently worked as a New York-based national writer for the Los Angeles Times and the Boston Globe, and as an investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal.

Before returning to the AP in 2003, Fritz left the news business to perform humanitarian work in the Darfur region of Sudan for the International Rescue Committee, and conduct war crimes investigations for Human Rights Watch in Uganda.

Fritz's nonfiction book, Lost on Earth, chronicles the stories of people uprooted by the wars that broke out at the end of the Cold War. He is also the author of the novel, Permanent Deadline.

Works[edit]

  • Lost on Earth: Nomads of the New World. Boston : Little, Brown and Co., 1999.[2] Trade paperback by Routledge.[3]
  • Permanent Deadline. Hermes House Press. 2014

Recognition[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mark Fritz Names Correspondent at Grand Rapids, Mich". Apnewsarchive.com. 1985-12-09. Retrieved 2014-01-13. 
  2. ^ http://books.google.com/books?isbn=0316294780
  3. ^ http://books.google.com/books?isbn=0415926092
  4. ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation". Pulitzer.org. Retrieved 2014-01-13. 
  5. ^ Mitchell, Bill (2002-09-01). "Advice from Best Newspaper Writing Winners – Mark Fritz | Poynter". Poynter. Retrieved 2014-01-13. 
  6. ^ Salon.com 1999 book awards

External links[edit]