Mark Hunter (ice hockey)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named Mark Hunter, see Mark Hunter (disambiguation).
Mark Hunter
Mark Hunter - Cgy.jpg
Born (1962-11-12) November 12, 1962 (age 51)
Petrolia, ON, CAN
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 205 lb (93 kg; 14 st 9 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Canadiens
St. Louis Blues
Calgary Flames
Hartford Whalers
Washington Capitals
NHL Draft 7th overall, 1981
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1981–1993

Mark William Hunter (born November 12, 1962) is a retired NHL ice hockey player and is currently the general manager of the London Knights of the OHL. Hunter was born in Petrolia, Ontario, but grew up in Oil Springs, Ontario.

Junior Hockey[edit]

Brantford Alexanders[edit]

Hunter began his junior hockey career with the Brantford Alexanders for the 1979–80 season where in his rookie season he finished fifth in team scoring, getting 34 goals and 89 points in 66 games, while getting 171 penalty minutes, helping Brantford to the playoffs. In 11 post-season games, Hunter had two goals and 10 points.

He returned to the Alexanders for the 1980–81 season, as Hunter appeared in 53 games, scoring 39 goals and 79 points to finish sixth in team scoring, while having a team high 157 penalty minutes. In six playoff games, Hunter had three goals and six points. After the season, Hunter was selected in the first round, seventh overall by the Montreal Canadiens in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft.

Professional career[edit]

Montreal Canadiens[edit]

Hunter made the NHL as an 18 year old with the Montreal Canadiens for the 1981–82 season. In 71 games with the Canadiens, Hunter had 18 goals and 29 points, while finishing second on the team with 143 penalty minutes, helping Montreal into the playoffs. In five playoff games against the Quebec Nordiques, Hunter had no points and 20 penalty minutes as the Canadiens lost to their provincial rivals.

Hunter appeared in only 31 games for the Canadiens during the 1982–83 season, scoring eight goals and 16 points, while accumulating 73 penalty minutes. He suffered a season ending knee injury on December 26, 1982 in a game against the Quebec Nordiques.

Hunter had another injury plagued season in 1983–84, playing in 22 games, scoring six goals and 10 points. Hunter was healthy for the playoffs, where he scored two goals and three points in 14 games, helping the Canadiens reach the Wales Conference finals, where they lost to the New York Islanders.

He was healthy during the 1984–85 season, as Hunter played in 72 games, scoring 21 goals and 33 points, while getting 123 penalty minutes, the second highest total on the team. In the playoffs, Hunter had three assists in 11 games, however, Montreal lost to the Quebec Nordiques in the Adams Division finals.

On June 15, 1985, the Canadiens traded Hunter, Michael Dark, and their second, third, fifth and sixth round draft picks in the 1985 NHL Entry Draft to the St. Louis Blues for the Blues first, second, fourth, fifth and sixth round draft picks in the 1985 NHL Entry Draft.

St. Louis Blues[edit]

Hunter joined the St. Louis Blues for the 1985–86 season, where he broke out offensively, scoring a team high 44 goals and finished second on team scoring with 74 points, helping St. Louis qualify for the playoffs. Hunter appeared in the 1986 NHL All-Star Game held in Hartford, Connecticut, going pointless as the Campbell Conference lost 4–3 in overtime to the Wales Conference. In the playoffs, Hunter had seven goals and 14 points in 19 games, helping the Blues reach the Campbell Conference finals, where they lost in seven games to the Calgary Flames.

Hunter had another solid season for the Blues in 1986–87, scoring 36 goals and 69 points to finish third in team scoring in 74 games. In the playoffs, Hunter had three assists in five games as the Blues lost to the Toronto Maple Leafs in the first round.

In 1987–88, Hunter missed 14 games due to injuries, however, he managed to break the 30 goal plateau for the third consecutive season, scoring 32 goals and 63 points in 66 games. In the post-season, Hunter had two goals and five points in five games, as the Blues lost to the Detroit Red Wings in the Norris Division finals.

On September 6, 1988, St. Louis traded Hunter, Doug Gilmour, Steve Bozek and Michael Dark to the Calgary Flames for Mike Bullard, Craig Coxe and Tim Corkery.

Calgary Flames[edit]

Hunter saw his offensive production drop in his first season with the Calgary Flames in 1988–89, as he scored 22 goals and 30 points, which was his lowest point total since the 1983–84 season, in 66 games. In ten playoff games, Hunter had two goals and four points, as he helped the Flames win the 1989 Stanley Cup Final over the Montreal Canadiens.

Hunter missed the majority of the 1989–90 season due to knee surgery. In ten games with the Flames, Hunter had two goals and five points and did not suit up for the team for the playoffs.

Hunter returned from his knee injury for the 1990–91 season, as in 57 games, he scored 10 goals and 25 points for Calgary. On March 5, 1991, the Flames traded Hunter to the Hartford Whalers for Carey Wilson.

Hartford Whalers[edit]

Hunter finished the 1990–91 season with the Hartford Whalers, where in 11 games, he scored four goals and seven points. In six playoff games, Hunter had five goals and six points as the Whalers lost to the Boston Bruins in the first round of the playoffs.

In 63 games with the Whalers in 1991–92, Hunter scored 10 goals and 23 points, helping the team reach the playoffs. In four playoff games, he did not earn any points, as the Whalers lost to the Montreal Canadiens in the first round.

On June 15, 1992, Hartford traded Hunter and Yvon Corriveau to the Washington Capitals for Nick Kypreos.

Washington Capitals[edit]

Hunter appeared in only seven games with the Washington Capitals during the 1992–93 season, earning no points for the team. He finished the year with the Baltimore Skipjacks of the AHL, where he had 13 goals and 31 points in 28 games with Baltimore. In seven playoff games, Hunter had three goals and four points for the Skipjacks.

Hunter retired from hockey after the season. In 628 career games, he scored 213 goals and 171 assists for 384 points, while accumulating 1426 penalty minutes.

Playing career[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1979–80 Brantford Alexanders OMJHL 66 34 55 89 171 11 2 8 10 27
1980–81 Brantford Alexanders OHL 53 39 40 79 157 6 3 3 6 27
1981–82 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 18 11 29 143 5 0 0 0 20
1982–83 Montreal Canadiens NHL 31 8 8 16 73
1983–84 Montreal Canadiens NHL 22 6 4 10 42 14 2 1 3 69
1984–85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 72 21 12 33 123 11 0 3 3 13
1985–86 St. Louis Blues NHL 78 44 30 74 171 19 7 7 14 48
1986–87 St. Louis Blues NHL 74 36 33 69 167 5 0 3 3 10
1987–88 St. Louis Blues NHL 66 32 31 63 136 5 2 3 5 24
1988–89 Calgary Flames NHL 66 22 8 30 194 10 2 2 4 23
1989–90 Calgary Flames NHL 10 2 3 5 35
1990–91 Calgary Flames NHL 57 10 15 25 125
1990–91 Hartford Whalers NHL 11 4 3 7 40 6 5 1 6 17
1991–92 Hartford Whalers NHL 63 10 13 23 159 4 0 0 0 6
1992–93 Washington Capitals NHL 7 0 0 0 14
1992–93 Baltimore Skipjacks AHL 28 13 18 31 66 7 3 1 4 12
OMJHL/OHL totals 119 73 96 169 328 17 5 11 16 54
AHL totals 28 13 18 31 66 7 3 1 4 12
NHL totals 628 213 171 384 1426 79 18 20 38 230

Coaching career[edit]

Sarnia Sting[edit]

Hunter became the coach of the Sarnia Sting in the OHL midway through the 1994–95 season. He led the Sting to a 17–19–2 record in 38 games, helping the team reach the playoffs. Sarnia was then swept by the Windsor Spitfires in the first round of the playoffs.

In the 1995–96 season, Hunter led the Sting to a 39–23–4 record, finishing in second place in the Western Division. Sarnia swept the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds in the first round of the playoffs, however, the Sting lost to the Peterborough Petes in the second round. After the season, Hunter left his head coaching position with the Sting to become the head coach of the St. John's Maple Leafs.

St. John's Maple Leafs[edit]

Hunter became the head coach of the St. John's Maple Leafs of the AHL for the 1996–97 season. Hunter led the Maple Leafs to a 36–28–10–6 record to finish in first place in the Canadian Division. In the playoffs, St. John's defeated the Binghamton Rangers in the first round, however, the Maple Leafs were eliminated in seven games by the Hamilton Bulldogs in the second round. After the season, Hunter left St. John's and returned to the Sarnia Sting.

Sarnia Sting[edit]

Hunter returned to the Sarnia Sting of the OHL for the 1997–98 season. He helped the club to the playoffs, as they finished with a 32–21–13 record, third place in the Western Division. They lost to the Plymouth Whalers in five games in the first round of the playoffs.

The Sting improved in the 1998–99 season, as the team finished with a 37–25–6 to finish in second place in the West Division. Sarnia had a disappointing playoff result though, losing in six games to the London Knights in the first round.

In 1999–2000, the Sting fell to a record of 33–27–8–0, finishing in third place in the West Division. In the post-season, the Sting lost to the Windsor Spitfires in seven game in the first round.

London Knights[edit]

Hunter became co-owner of the London Knights with his brother Dale Hunter, where he served as an assistant coach and general manager of the club while Dale was the head coach of the Knights. On November 28, 2011, Mark became the head coach of the Knights when Dale left to become the head coach of the Washington Capitals.

Coaching career[edit]

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L T OTL Pts Finish Result
SAR 1994–95 38 17 19 2 - 36 3rd in West Lost in first round
SAR 1995–96 66 39 23 4 - 82 2nd in West Lost in second round
SJML 1996–97 80 36 28 10 6 88 1st in Canadian Lost in second round
SAR 1997–98 66 32 22 13 - 77 3rd in West Lost in first round
SAR 1998–99 68 37 25 6 - 80 2nd in West Lost in first round
SAR 1999-00 68 33 27 8 0 74 3rd in West Lost in first round

Family[edit]

Mark has three brothers, two of which (Dale Hunter and Dave Hunter) also played in the NHL. Their father also scouts for the Knights. Hunter's son Garett Hunter played parts of three seasons for the London Knights from 2007-2010.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Doug Wickenheiser
Montreal Canadiens first round draft pick
1981
Succeeded by
Gilbert Delorme