Mark Vaile

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The Honourable
Mark Vaile
AO
Mark Vaile (TM).jpg
12th Deputy Prime Minister of Australia
In office
6 July 2005 – 3 December 2007
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by John Anderson
Succeeded by Julia Gillard
Minister for Transport and Regional Development
In office
25 September 1997 – 21 October 1998
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by John Sharp
Succeeded by John Anderson
In office
29 September 2006 – 3 December 2007
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by Warren Truss
Succeeded by Anthony Albanese
Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
In office
21 October 1998 – 19 July 1999
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by John Anderson
Succeeded by Warren Truss
Minister for Trade and Investment
In office
20 July 1999 – 19 September 2006
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by Tim Fischer
Succeeded by Warren Truss
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Lyne
In office
13 March 1993 – 30 July 2008
Preceded by Bruce Cowan
Succeeded by Rob Oakeshott
Personal details
Born (1956-04-18) 18 April 1956 (age 58)
Sydney, New South Wales
Nationality Australian
Political party National Party
Children 3
Residence Taree, New South Wales
Religion Roman Catholic[1][2]

Mark Anthony James Vaile AO (born 18 April 1956) is a former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia and former leader of the National Party of Australia. Vaile is currently a non-executive director of a number of public listed corporations.

Early life[edit]

Vaile was born in Sydney and worked as a farm machinery retailer and stock and station and real estate agent before entering politics. He was a member of the Greater Taree City Council 1985–93, including three years as Deputy Mayor.[1]

Parliamentary career[edit]

Vaile was a member of the Australian House of Representatives between March 1993 and July 2008, representing the Division of Lyne, New South Wales. He was Assistant National Party Whip 1994–96 and National Party Whip 1996–97. In 1997 he was appointed Minister for Transport and Regional Development, and in 1998 he became Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry. In July 1999, following the resignation of Tim Fischer and the election of John Anderson as National Party leader, he was elected the party's Deputy Leader and became Minister for Trade. When John Anderson resigned in 2005, Vaile was elected Leader unopposed. On 6 July 2005 he was sworn in as Deputy Prime Minister.[1]

As Trade Minister, Vaile was involved in the negotiation of the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement, which was opposed by some traditional National Party constituencies such as the sugar industry.

There was much controversy over the intellectual property chapter of the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement. The chapter contains elements modelled on the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act 1998 (US) and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act 1998 (US) In December 2003, Trade Minister Mark Vaile pledged to defend the copyright term in Australia: “It is a very important issue, particularly in terms of cost to libraries, educational institutions and the like here in Australia.” Two months later, Australia agreed to a copyright term extension, as part of the deal with the United States. There was also much criticism of the adoption of a US-style technological protection measures - particularly as the High Court of Australia was considering the matter of Stevens v Sony. There was also controversy over the evergreening of pharmaceutical drug patents and access to essential medicines under the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement.

During 2005 he also conducted negotiations for the proposed Australia-China Free Trade Agreement. In late 2005 he had an operation to remove a malignant melanoma from his back.[3]

Since Vaile took on the leadership of the Nationals in 2005, there were increasing suggestions for Vaile to take on a domestic portfolio as the trade portfolio requires frequent overseas travel. Throughout 2006, Vaile's position in the trade portfolio came under increasing scrutiny due to his handling of the AWB kickbacks scandal and Australia's worsening trade performance. He also faced the difficult task of placating his back bench, with Queensland Senator Barnaby Joyce having crossed the floor on more than one occasion. On 24 September 2006 he switched portfolios with deputy Nationals leader Warren Truss and became Minister for Transport and Regional Services. His new position had a greater focus on regional Australia, the Nationals party's main constituency.

Following the coalition's defeat at the 2007 federal election, Vaile resigned his position as Nationals leader and moved to the backbench.[4][5] Vaile announced his resignation from Parliament on 19 July 2008, with effect from 30 July;[6] which triggered a Lyne by-election, won by an independent politician, Rob Oakeshott.[7][8]

Post-parliament career[edit]

In September 2008, Vaile was appointed to the board of Virgin Australia Holdings (ASXVAH).[9] Vaile is also the independent chairman and a non-executive director of Whitehaven Coal Limited ASXWHC;[10] chairman of the Regional Infrastructure Fund of Palisade Investment Partners, a specialist independent infrastructure manager;[11] a non-executive director, appointed by the Australian Hotels Association of HOSTPLUS, an industry superannuation fund;[12] a non-executive director of Servcorp (ASXSRV);[13] a director of the Singapore-listed Stamford Land Corporation (SGX: H07);[14] and Chairman of 123 Childcare, an education provider in the People's Republic of China.[15]

Honours[edit]

On 1 January 2001, he was awarded the Centenary Medal for "service as Minister for Trade".[16] On 11 June 2012, he was named an Officer of the Order of Australia for "distinguished service to the Parliament of Australia, through support for rural and regional communities, to the pursuit of global trade and investment opportunities, and to the citizens of the Taree region."[17]

Personal[edit]

A Roman Catholic, Vaile is married with three children.[1][2] He lives on a 40 ha (100-acre) rural property outside Taree, New South Wales.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Vaile takes over Nationals". The Age. AAP. 23 June 2005. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Pearson, Christopher (3 February 2007). "Opinion: Catholics flock to cabinet". The Australian. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  3. ^ "Deputy PM back at work". Manning River Times. 8 November 2005. Archived from the original on 12 March 2007. Retrieved 16 August 2007. 
  4. ^ "New shock as Vaile quits". Sydney Morning Herald. 26 November 2007. Retrieved 26 November 2007. 
  5. ^ "Vaile stands down". ABC News (Australia). 26 November 2007. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "Vaile calls it a day". The Land. 20 July 2008. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  7. ^ "Stoner says no to running in Vaile's Lyne". The Land. 29 July 2008. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  8. ^ Honan, Kim (9 September 2008). "National Party loses Mark Vaile seat". Landline (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  9. ^ Creedy, Steve (23 September 2008). "Mark Vaile lands seat on Virgin Blue board". The Australian. Retrieved 23 October 2008. 
  10. ^ "Board of Directors". Whitehaven Coal Limited. 2013. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  11. ^ "Hon. Mark Vaile AO". Our team. Palisade Investment Partners. 2013. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  12. ^ "Mark Vaile". Our people. Host-Plus Pty Limited. 2013. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  13. ^ "Mark Vaile joins Servcorp Limited Board" (PDF) (Press release). Servcorp Limited. 27 June 2011. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  14. ^ "Board of Directors". Stamford Land Corporation Ltd. 2013. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  15. ^ "Board of Directors". Our leadership. 123 AustChina Education Consultancy (Beijing) Ltd. 2011. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  16. ^ "Mark Anthony Vaile". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 11 June 2012. 
  17. ^ "Officer (AO) in the General Division of the Order of Australia - The Queen's Birthday 2012 Honours Lists". Official Secretary to the Governor-General of Australia. 11 June 2012. p. 41. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
John Sharp
Minister for Transport and Regional Development
1997–99
Succeeded by
John Anderson
Preceded by
John Anderson
Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
1998–99
Succeeded by
Warren Truss
Preceded by
Tim Fischer
Minister for Trade
1999–2006
Preceded by
Warren Truss
Minister for Transport and Regional Services
2006–07
Succeeded by
Anthony Albanese
Preceded by
John Anderson
Deputy Prime Minister of Australia
2005–07
Succeeded by
Julia Gillard
Party political offices
Preceded by
John Anderson
Leader of the National Party of Australia
2005–07
Succeeded by
Warren Truss
Preceded by
John Anderson
Deputy Leader of the
National Party of Australia

1999–2005
Succeeded by
Warren Truss
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Bruce Cowan
Member for Lyne
1993–2008
Succeeded by
Rob Oakeshott