Mark Williams (Australian footballer born 1958)

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Mark Williams
Personal information
Full name Mark Melville Williams
Nickname(s) Choco
Date of birth (1958-08-21) 21 August 1958 (age 56)
Original team West Adelaide (SANFL)
Height/Weight 183cm / 80kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)

1976 – 1978
1979 – 1980;
1990 – 1992
Total

1981 – 1986
1987 – 1990
Total
SANFL
West Adelaide
Port Adelaide


VFL/AFL
Collingwood
Brisbane Bears

064 0(37)
115 (104)

179 (141)

135 (178)
066 0(58)
201 (236)
Representative team honours
Years Team Games (Goals)


2008
South Australia
Victoria
Dream Team (coach)
8
1
1
Coaching career3
Years Club Games (W–L–D)
1999–2010 Port Adelaide 274 (151–121–2)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1992 season.
2 State and international statistics correct as of 2008.
3 Coaching statistics correct as of 2011.
Career highlights

Mark Melville Williams (born 21 August 1958) is the Head Development Coach at the Richmond Football Club in the Australian Football League (AFL).[1] A former Australian rules footballer, Williams represented Port Adelaide in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) as well as Collingwood and Brisbane Bears in the AFL from the 1980s to the 1990s.

One of several successful father-son combinations in Australian rules football, Williams became a successful coach after finishing his playing career, leading Port Adelaide to their first AFL premiership in 2004.

Early life and career[edit]

The son of South Australian football legend Fos Williams, Williams playing career began with West Adelaide, where his father was serving as coach. He represented West Adelaide on 64 occasions for 37 goals. Williams then moved to the Port Adelaide Football Club, becoming one of the stars of the SANFL.

Moving to Victoria (1981–1990)[edit]

After the 1980 season, Williams was recruited by Collingwood, making his Victorian Football League (VFL) debut in the 1981 season. Williams justified the hype over his recruitment by winning state selection for Victoria as well as the Copeland Trophy. He was named at centre for Collingwood in the Grand Final against Carlton. Collingwood lost, but Williams was recognized as being among the Magpies' better players on the day. When John Cahill took over as coach after a tumultuous season in 1982, he appointed Williams captain, having previously worked with him at Port Adelaide. Williams remained captain of Collingwood until he left at the end of 1986.

In 1984 Williams led Collingwood's goalkicking, kicking 53 goals for the season. However, he was unavailable for the Preliminary Final due to injury, and Collingwood went down to eventual premiers Essendon by 133 points.

A contract dispute at the end of the 1986 season saw Williams reluctantly[citation needed] make the move north to join the fledgling Brisbane Bears. He was appointed vice-captain to Mark Mickan at the new club. Williams played three and a half seasons before retiring from the Bears midway through the 1990 AFL season.

Return to South Australia (1990-1992)[edit]

Williams returned to Port Adelaide, and finished the 1990 season there, before playing a further two seasons. In his two stints at Port Adelaide, Williams played 115 games, kicking 104 goals, and won four premierships. He retired from playing at the end of 1992, with a total of 380 league games to his name.

Coaching career (1993–present)[edit]

Early career[edit]

Williams coached SANFL club Glenelg in 1993 and 1994 before joining AFL club Essendon as an assistant coach.

Port Adelaide Power (1997–2010)[edit]

In 1997, Williams joined Port Adelaide as an assistant coach in its inaugural season in the AFL, and in 1999, won the head coaching role at Port Adelaide, replacing John Cahill. Port Adelaide won the minor premiership three seasons in a row under Williams' reign (2002, 2003 and 2004); after failing to reach the Grand Final in either 2002 or 2003, the club went on to win its first AFL premiership in 2004. In 2007, Williams once again coached Port Adelaide to the Grand Final, but his side suffered the worst ever grand final defeat, losing to Geelong by 119 points. Throughout 2009, Port Adelaide's inconsistent on-field performances continued to focus on Williams' future at the club. Late in the season, following the appointment of Mark Haysman as CEO, and after much conjecture in the media, Williams was offered a new 2 year contract. On 9 July 2010, Williams resigned as coach of Port Adelaide and coached his final game for Port Adelaide against Collingwood at AAMI Stadium.

Greater Western Sydney Giants (2011–2012)[edit]

In 2010, Williams signed with the Greater Western Sydney Giants as the senior assistant coach to Kevin Sheedy. In September 2012, Williams informed the club after the last home and away game of the season that he would not be honouring the final season of his contract in 2013.

Richmond Football Club (2013 – present)[edit]

After the completion of the 2012 home and away season, Williams signed with the Richmond Football Club as a development coach working with senior coach Damien Hardwick.[1][2] In November 2014, Williams was diagnosed with lymphoma.[3]

Footballing dynasty[edit]

Williams comes from a large and intensely proud footballing dynasty, closely aligned with Port Adelaide. His father, the late Fos Williams, is often referred to as the father of the Port Adelaide Football Club. His twin brother Anthony played at SANFL level, while younger brother Stephen played at both SANFL and AFL level and coached Port Adelaide to three SANFL premierships. His sister, Jenny, briefly served as a psychologist with the club. Mark is married to Pauline and they have three sons and two daughters.[4]

Statistics[edit]

Playing statistics[edit]

[5]
Legend
 G  Goals  B  Behinds  K  Kicks  H  Handballs  D  Disposals  M  Marks  T  Tackles
Led the league for the Season only*
Led the league after finals only*
Led the league after Season and Finals*

*10 games required to be eligible.

Season Team # Games G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
Totals Averages (per game)
1981 Collingwood 21 25 21 18 388 129 517 62 0.8 0.7 15.5 5.2 20.7 2.5
1982 Collingwood 21 22 22 14 340 130 470 91 1.0 0.6 15.5 5.9 21.4 4.1
1983 Collingwood 21 22 42 22 353 115 468 98 1.9 1.0 16.0 5.2 21.3 4.5
1984 Collingwood 21 23 53 31 257 113 370 77 2.3 1.3 11.2 4.9 16.1 3.3
1985 Collingwood 21 22 16 13 341 134 475 83 0.7 0.6 15.5 6.1 21.6 3.8
1986 Collingwood 21 21 24 20 269 139 408 95 1.1 1.0 12.8 6.6 19.4 4.5
1987 Brisbane Bears 2 19 27 16 263 133 396 72 46 1.4 0.8 13.8 7.0 20.8 3.8 2.4
1988 Brisbane Bears 2 14 5 16 218 90 308 50 30 0.4 1.1 15.6 6.4 22.0 3.6 2.1
1989 Brisbane Bears 2 22 19 18 310 151 461 84 56 0.9 0.8 14.1 6.9 21.0 3.8 2.5
1990 Brisbane Bears 2 11 7 11 135 72 207 26 26 0.6 1.0 12.3 6.5 18.8 2.4 2.4
Career 201 236 179 2874 1206 4080 738 158 1.2 0.9 14.3 6.0 20.3 3.7 2.4

Coaching statistics[edit]

[6]
Denotes seasons in which Williams won an AFL Premiership
Season Team Games Coached Wins Losses Draws Points % Ladder Position League Teams
1999 Port Adelaide 23 12 11 0 52.2% 7 16
2000 Port Adelaide 22 7 14 1 34.1% 14 16
2001 Port Adelaide 24 16 8 0 66.7% 3 16
2002 Port Adelaide 25 19 6 0 76.0% 1 16
2003 Port Adelaide 25 19 6 0 76.0% 1 16
2004 Port Adelaide 25 20 5 0 80.0% 1 16
2005 Port Adelaide 24 12 11 1 52.1% 8 16
2006 Port Adelaide 22 8 14 0 36.4% 12 16
2007 Port Adelaide 25 17 8 0 68.0% 2 16
2008 Port Adelaide 22 7 15 0 31.8% 13 16
2009 Port Adelaide 22 9 13 0 40.9% 10 16
2010 Port Adelaide 15 5 10 0 33.3% 10 16
Career totals 274 151 121 2 55.47% 6.83 16.00

See also[edit]

1990 SANFL Grand Final

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Tigers’ Choco treat". Richmond Football Club. 20 November 2013. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Richmond Football Club (4 September 2012); Dimma’s ‘Choco’ delight
  3. ^ "AFL premiership coach Mark 'Choco' Williams diagnosed with Lymphoma". 23 November 2014. 
  4. ^ "Is this the end of the Williams dynasty?". AdelaideNow.com.au. 2010-07-09. Retrieved 2011-03-26. 
  5. ^ Mark Williams' player profile at AFL Tables
  6. ^ Mark Williams' coaching profile at AFL Tables

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Peter Moore
Captain of Collingwood
1983–1986
Succeeded by
Tony Shaw
Preceded by
Peter Moore
Copeland Trophy winner
1981
Succeeded by
Peter Daicos
Preceded by
Tony Shaw
Copeland Trophy winner
1985
Succeeded by
Wes Fellowes
Preceded by
John Cahill
Port Adelaide Football Club coach
1999–2010
Succeeded by
Matthew Primus