Mark Wood (bishop)

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The Rt Revd
Mark Wood
BA
Bishop of Ludlow
Diocese Diocese of Hereford
In office 1981–1987
Successor Ian Griggs
Other posts Honorary assistant bishop in Southwark (2002–present)
Archdeacon of Ludlow (1982–1983)
Assistant bishop in Hereford (1977–1981)
Bishop of Matabeleland (1971–1977)
Dean of Salisbury, Rhodesia (1965–1970)
Orders
Ordination 1942 (deacon); 1943 (priest)
Consecration 1971
Personal details
Born (1919-05-21) 21 May 1919 (age 95)
Denomination Anglican
Parents Arthur & Jane
Spouse Winifred Toase (m. 1947)
Children 3 sons; 2 daughters
Alma mater University College, Cardiff

Stanley Mark Wood (born 21 May 1919) was the third Anglican Bishop of Matabeleland and the first Bishop of Ludlow.[1]

Wood was educated at University College, Cardiff.[2] After studying at the College of the Resurrection he was ordained as a deacon in 1942 and as a priest in 1943.[3] After a curacy at St Mary's Cardiff Docks[4] he served the Anglican Church in Southern Africa for over 30 years. He was curate of Sophiatown Mission, Johannesburg (1945–47); Rector of Bloemhof, Transvaal (1947–50); Priest in Charge of St Cyprian's Mission, Johannesburg (1950–55); Rector of Marandellas, Zimbabwe (1955–65); Dean of Salisbury, Rhodesia (1965–70); Bishop of Matabeleland (1971-77) before returning to England, firstly as an assistant bishop in the Diocese of Hereford and finally as its suffragan bishop. He retired to Surrey in 1987.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Times, 9 November 1981, p12, "Church news: Inaugural Bishop of Ludlow announced"
  2. ^ ‘WOOD, Rt Rev. (Stanley) Mark’, Who's Who 2012, A & C Black, 2012; online edition, Oxford University Press, December 2011 [1], accessed 5 July 2012
  3. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory 1995 (Lambeth, Church House ISBN 0-7151-8088-6)
  4. ^ Church history
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Kenneth Skelton
Bishop of Matabeleland
1971–1977
Succeeded by
Robert Mercer
New title Bishop of Ludlow
1981–1987
Succeeded by
Ian Griggs