Marko Dević

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Marko Dević
Markodevic.jpg
Dević with Metalist Kharkiv in 2010
Personal information
Full name Marko Dević
Date of birth (1983-10-27) 27 October 1983 (age 30)
Place of birth Belgrade, SFR Yugoslavia
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Attacking midfielder
Second striker
Club information
Current team
Rubin Kazan
Number 11
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2000–2002 Zvezdara 14 (2)
2002–2003 Železnik 19 (1)
2003–2004 Radnički Beograd 16 (1)
2004 Voždovac 14 (4)
2005–2006 Volyn Lutsk 32 (2)
2006–2012 Metalist Kharkiv 148 (64)
2012–2013 Shakhtar Donetsk 12 (4)
2013–2014 Metalist Kharkiv 26 (19)
2014– Rubin Kazan 11 (3)
National team
2008– Ukraine 34 (7)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15 May 2014.

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 9 March 2014

Marko Dević[1] (Serbian Cyrillic: Марко Девић, Ukrainian: Марко Девич, also romanized as Marko Devich[2]; born 27 October 1983) is a Serbian-born Ukrainian international footballer who plays for Rubin Kazan as an attacking midfielder or a second striker.

Dević became the top scorer in the 2007–08 Ukrainian Premier League with 19 goals in 27 appearances. In 2013, he also became the first player of the Ukraine national football team who managed to score a hat-trick in official games. Since 2006, Dević plays for FC Metalist Kharkiv in the Ukrainian Premier League with a brief stint in FC Shakhtar Donetsk for the 2012–13 season.

Club career[edit]

Serbia[edit]

Born in Belgrade (SR Serbia, SFR Yugoslavia), Dević started his career at his hometown club Zvezdara, making 14 appearances and scoring twice in two seasons with the club. He later played for Železnik, Radnički Beograd and Voždovac, all in Serbia. He spent just one year at each of the clubs. He scored three goals in 20 appearances for Železnik, including one goal in 19 league appearances and two goals in one cup match. He scored once in 16 appearances for Radnički, before joining Voždovac where he scored four times in 14 appearances. At the end of the season season, Dević moved to Ukraine to play for Volyn Lutsk.

Ukraine[edit]

Volyn Lutsk[edit]

In 2005, Dević was bought by Ukrainian club Volyn Lutsk during the 2004–05 Ukrainian Premier League. He made 14 appearances but failed to score a single goal as Volyn finished in 8th position.[3] The following season he netted twice in 18 league appearances for Volyn. At the end of the season the club was relegated[4] and Dević was considering to go back to Serbia. Instead he moved to Metalist Kharkiv. Dević made 32 league appearances for Volyn, and a further one cup appearance, scoring two goals.

Metalist Kharkiv[edit]

Noticing Dević, Myron Markevych had him bought by Vyscha Liha club Metalist Kharkiv. He scored 4 goals in 27 league appearances in his first season as Metalist finished in 3rd position.[5] In the 2007–08 season, he was top scorer of the Ukrainian Premier League with 19 goals in 27 matches played. Close behind him were Oleksandr Hladky, Oleksandr Kosyrin and Yevhen Seleznyov, each with 17 goals scored.[6] Despite Dević's goal scoring efforts Metalist finished in third place once again. Dević had a slow start in the beginning of the 2008–09 season but in the 13th round he scored both goals in a 2–0 win over Chornomorets Odessa. He finished the season with eight goals from 24 league matches as Metalist once again finished third.[7] Metalist also made it to the round of 16 in the UEFA Cup but lost out to another Ukrainian side, Dynamo Kyiv, on away goals after a 3–3 aggregate score.[8] Dević scored eight goals in 24 league appearances in the 2008–09 season, with Metalist finishing in 3rd place.[7] In the 2009–10 season he netted eight times in 20 league appearances as Metalist finished third.[9] In the 2010–11 season Dević topped the assist table for the season with 9 assists. He also managed 14 goals in 24 league appearances to become the second highest goal scorer behind Yevhen Seleznyov of Dnipro, helping Metalist to a 3rd place finish.[10] The 2011–12 season saw Dević score 11 goals from 26 league matches as Metalist finished 3rd for the sixth season in a row.[11] Metalist also progressed to the quarter final stage of the Europa League, losing out to Portuguese side Sporting 3–2 on aggregate.[12] Dević scored five goals and three assists in 484 minutes of play in the competition, finishing in a tie for eighth place in the scoring charts.

He left the club in 2012 after six seasons to join the reigning Ukrainian Premier League champions Shakhtar Donetsk. Dević managed to score 64 goals in 148 league appearances for Metalist and 75 from 192 appearances in all competitions.

Shakhtar Donetsk[edit]

Dević joined Shakhtar during the 2012–13 Premier League season on a four year contract[13] for a fee of £4.4 million. Although he had the number 33 at Metalist, he instead took number 18 at Shakhtar as the number 33 shirt was already assigned to Darijo Srna. He made his first appearance for Shakhtar as a 77th minute substitute for Alex Teixeira in a 2–0 victory over Metalurh Donetsk in the 2012 Super Cup.[14] This success marked Dević's first trophy. His league debut for Shakhtar came in a comprehensive 6–0 victory over Arsenal Kyiv. He came on as a substitute for Alex Teixeira in the 69th minute and scored his first goal for Shakhtar, a penalty, in the 94th minute of the match.[15] His first start came in a commanding 4–0 victory over Volyn Lutsk. He scored the first goal of the match after 4 minutes and added an assist for Henrikh Mkhitaryan.[16] He scored another goal in a 4–1 win against Vorskla.[17]

International career[edit]

In June 2008, Dević became a naturalized Ukrainian citizen in hopes of playing for the Ukraine national football team.[18] Although Dević is not the first footballer from outside the former Soviet Union to accept Ukrainian citizenship, his decision has led to numerous discussions in the media on the adoption of foreign players. The first international player to become a naturalized Ukrainian was Mamadi Sangare from Conakry, Guinea who in 2008 played for FC Desna Chernihiv and before that FC CSKA Kyiv.

Dević also had a very successful season in 2007–08, scoring 19 goals and becoming the top scorer; this in turn put some pressure on the head coach of the national team Olexiy Mykhailychenko who hesitated with Dević's selection. In his defense Mykhailychenko stated that just because a striker had one great season that might not be enough to consider Dević for selection. Nonetheless Dević was first called up to the team by Oleksiy Mykhailychenko for a friendly match against Norway on 19 November 2008,[19] becoming the third naturalized citizen on the Ukraine national football team called up at that time, along with Oleksandr Aliyev and Artem Milevskiy. Dević played the second half of the match and wore the number 10 shirt. In the next couple of years his match participation dropped noticeably, due to his low performance in the Premier League as well as not scoring with the national team.

Dević was a member of Ukraine's squad for UEFA Euro 2012. On 19 June 2012, he was in the starting line-up for the game against England in the final round of games before the quarter-finals. Ukraine lost 0–1, with Wayne Rooney's scrappy second-half finish carrying England through at the Donbass Arena in Donetsk. However, Dević had a goal disallowed in the second half after John Terry hooked the ball clear from behind the line, as confirmed by video replays.[20] England ultimately won Group D (after Sweden unexpectedly overturned France) and Ukraine were dumped out of their own tournament. Dević's "ghost goal" reopened football's goal-line technology debate.[21][22][23] While replays of the build-up also appeared to show Dević's teammate Artem Milevskiy — who set up Dević — in an offside position when the ball was played to him, which too went unnoticed by the officials.[24] The following day, UEFA and its chief refereeing officer Pierluigi Collina admitted an error had been made and that Dević and Ukraine had been denied a legitimate goal.[25][26]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of 30 September 2013
Club Season League Cup Europe Super Cup Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Zvezdara 2000–01 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
2001–02 13 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 1
Total 14 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 2
Železnik 2002–03 19 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 20 3
Total 19 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 20 3
Radnički Beograd 2003–04 16 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 1
Total 16 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 1
Voždovac 2004–05 14 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 4
Total 14 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 4
Volyn Lutsk 2004–05 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0
2005–06 18 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 19 2
Total 32 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 33 2
Metalist 2006–07 27 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 32 4
2007–08 27 19 1 1 2 0 0 0 30 20
2008–09 24 8 3 2 9 1 0 0 36 11
2009–10 20 8 1 0 4 0 0 0 25 8
2010–11 24 14 0 0 6 2 0 0 30 16
2011–12 26 11 0 0 13 5 0 0 39 16
2012–13 10 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 5
2013–14 11 13 1 1 2 2 0 0 14 16
Total 169 82 11 4 36 10 0 0 216 96
Shakhtar 2012–13 12 4 1 0 2 0 1 0 16 4
Total 12 4 1 0 2 0 1 0 16 4
Career Total 276 96 14 6 38 10 1 0 329 112

International[edit]

As of 6 September 2013[27]
Ukraine national team
Year Apps Goals
2008 1 0
2009 1 0
2010 5 0
2011 10 2
2012 8 0
2013 6 4
2014 1 1
Total 32 7

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Ukraine's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 9 February 2011 GSP Stadium, Nicosia  Sweden 1–1 1–1 Friendly
2 15 November 2011 Arena Lviv, Lviv  Austria 2–1 2–1 Friendly
3 6 September 2013 Arena Lviv, Lviv  San Marino 1–0 9–0 2014 World Cup qualifier
4 15 October 2013 Serravalle, San Marino  San Marino 0–2 0–8 WC 2014 Qual
5 0–4
6 0–6
7 5 March 2014 Larnaca, Cyprus  United States 2–0 2–0 Friendly

Honours[edit]

Shakhtar Donetsk
Individual

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Marko Dević". UEFA. Retrieved 10 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "Marko Devich". FIFA. Retrieved 15 June 2012. 
  3. ^ "Ukrainian Premier League standings 2004/05". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  4. ^ "Ukraine 2005/06". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  5. ^ "Ukraine 2006/07". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  6. ^ "Сезон 2007-2008" (in Ukrainian). UAFootball.net.ua. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Ukraine 2008/09". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  8. ^ "Dynamo hold off tenacious Metalist". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  9. ^ "Ukraine 2009/10". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  10. ^ "Ukraine 2010/11". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  11. ^ "Ukraine 2011/12". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  12. ^ "Metalist pay the penalty as Sporting progress". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  13. ^ "Marko Devic swaps Metalist for Shakhtar". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  14. ^ "Metalurh Donetsk vs Shakhtar 0–2". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  15. ^ "Shakhtar vs Arsenal Kyiv 6–0". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  16. ^ "Volyn vs Shakhtar 0–4". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  17. ^ "Shakhtar vs Vorskla 4–1". Retrieved 1 October 2012. 
  18. ^ "Марко Девич: "Очень рад, что получил гражданство Украины"" [Marko Dević: "I am very happy to have received Ukrainian citizenship"] (in Ukrainian). UA-Football.com. 3 July 2008. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  19. ^ "Михайличенко викликав трьох гравців "Металіста"" [Mykhailychenko called up three players from "Metalist"] (in Ukrainian). UA-Football.com. 10 November 2008. Retrieved 29 November 2013. 
  20. ^ Tidey, Will (19 June 2012). "Ukraine vs. England: Marko Devic Enters Goal-Line Technology Hall of Shame". The Bleacher Report. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  21. ^ Barlow, Matt (19 June 2012). "Ghost goal fury of Blokhin while Hodgson's happy to get rub of the green". Daily Mail. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  22. ^ "5 Famous Soccer Goal-Line Controversies". The Washington Post. 19 June 2012. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  23. ^ "England, France through to Euro 2012 quarters". Herald Sun. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012. 
  24. ^ "Rooney seizes his chance to lift England's expectations". The Independent. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012. 
  25. ^ "Euro 2012: Uefa admits Ukraine were deprived of a goal against England". The Guardian. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012. 
  26. ^ "Euro 2012: Ukraine goal crossed the line and should have been given says Uefa referee chief Pierluigi Collina". The Daily Telegraph. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012. 
  27. ^ "Dević, Marko". National Football Teams. Retrieved 16 December 2011. 

External links[edit]