Marla English

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Marla English
Born [1] Marleine Gaile English
(1935-01-04) January 4, 1935 (age 79)
San Diego, California, U.S.
Died December 10, 2012(2012-12-10) (aged 77)[2]
Tucson, AZ, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 1953–1957
Spouse(s) A. Paul Sutherland (1956-2012)

Marla English (January 4, 1935, San Diego, California – December 10, 2012, Tucson, Arizona) was an American film actress during the 1950s. She was originally signed to a contract by Paramount Pictures after winning a San Diego beauty pageant. She was paid $150 per week to appear in such films as Red Garters (1954) and Rear Window (1954).[3]

She received a major break when she was cast opposite Spencer Tracy in The Mountain,[3] a film which was to be made in France. Marla was given a smallpox vaccine before leaving to go on location. She quickly developed a raging fever and decided to pull out of the movie. Paramount suspended English and replaced her with Barbara Darrow. Parade Magazine questioned English about her decision in September 1955. She said it was a very dumb move and was unsure why she decided against making The Mountain. A close relative told the publication that English had fallen in love with Paramount actor Larry Pennell. She became enraged when the studio would not give Pennell a role in the film so they could travel to France together.[3]

English made mostly B-movie films throughout her career in Hollywood. Some of these include Three Bad Sisters (1956), Runaway Daughters (1956), The She Creature (1956), Flesh and the Spur (1957), and Voodoo Woman (1957). In 1955, she appeared with John Ireland and Pennell in Hell's Horizon. She gave up her acting career in 1956, aged 21, when she became engaged to San Diego businessman A. Paul Sutherland.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ UTsandiego.com
  2. ^ "Marla English, ‘Fairest of the Fair,’ actress, dead at 77". UTSanDiego.com. 2013-01-10. Retrieved 2013-01-23. 
  3. ^ a b c "Marla English: She chose love". St. Petersburg Times. September 18, 1955. 

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