List of Pokémon (102–151)

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The Pokémon franchise has 719 (as of the release of Pokémon X and Y) distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon. This is a selected listing of 50 of the Pokémon species, originally found in the Red and Green versions, arranged as they are in the main game series' National Pokédex.

Exeggcute[edit]

"Tamatama" redirects here. For the 2011 film, see Tamatama (film).
Number: 102 Type: Grass/Psychic Evolves from: None Evolves into: Exeggutor

Exeggcute (タマタマ?, Tamatama), known as the Egg Pokémon, is a single Pokémon with six separate seed bodies (often mistaken for eggs, according to the Pokémon episode, "March of the Exeggutor Squad"). Exeggcute's name is a play on the word "execute". Tamatama could be taken to mean 偶然, unexpectedly, although it is more likely to be derived from 玉 tama, sphere, doubled. It is worth noting that the Japanese word for egg is 卵 tamago. They use telepathic signals only they can receive to remain in their balanced formation; even if one is separated, it will quickly rejoin its swarm. Each member of the swarm has a different appearance in number of cracks, deformations, personalities and facial expressions. Some Exeggcute can have such severe cracking and breakage that a yolk can be seen inside. The middle body often has the fewest or no cracks at all, and is assumed to be the boss of the group.

Kotaku's Patricia Hernandez called Exeggcute an "awful Pokémon", criticizing its design as nothing more than "broken eggs."[1]

Exeggutor[edit]

Number: 103 Type: Grass/Psychic Evolves from: Exeggcute Evolves into: None

Exeggutor (ナッシー Nasshī?, Nassy), is known as the Coconut Pokémon. Its name is believed to be derived from the name of its previous evolutionary stage (Exeggcute), whose name is derived from egg and the word execute so Exeggutor's name is a combination of egg and executor. The Japanese name is derived from the words ココナッツ kokonattsu (coconuts) and 椰子 yashi (palm tree). Exeggutor resembles a coconut palm tree with three independently thinking heads. The heads are considered fruit or nuts and each has a different expression on its face, similarly to Exeggcute. When an Exeggcute evolves into Exeggutor through exposure to a Leaf Stone, any cracks and breaks are mended as they turn yellow and combine to form the new Exeggutor. Living in a good environment will allow it to grow lots of heads, and it is said that they occasionally fall off to form new Exeggcute.

In an open forum interview with ABC News, Creatures Inc. founder Tsunekazu Ishihara noted Exeggutor as his favorite Pokémon, citing it was the Pokémon he used while debugging the games.[2]

Cubone[edit]

Number: 104 Type: Ground Evolves from: None Evolves into: Marowak

Cubone (カラカラ?, Karakara), known as the Lonely Pokémon, appears to be a small, brown dinosaur-like Pokémon, that constantly wears its mother's skull like a helmet.[3] The skull masks its true face from view, which makes it a puzzlement for many Trainers and researchers.[4] Its cries echo within the skull and it comes out as a pained and sad melody.[3] On the night of a full moon, it cries, for it seems to recognize its mother's face in the moon.[5] Its tears create stains on the skull.[5] Cubone has a plump body with a paler-colored underbelly, with strong, clawed limbs to carry its bone as a weapon around wherever it goes. Cubone has a single, nailed toe on each foot, with two spikes on its back. A small tail is also present for balance, but it can be used for attacking. Originally called "Karakara" in Japanese, Nintendo decided to give the various Pokémon species "clever and descriptive names" related to their appearance or features when translating the game for western audiences as a means to make the characters more relatable to American children.[6] Originally, its name was to be "Orphon," in reference to the story of it losing its mother. The name Cubone may come from a combination of "cute" and "bone," because it is a young Pokémon.[7]

In the anime, Cubone first appeared on the Pokémon episode The School of Hard Knocks under the ownership of a pretty, yet snobby Pokémon Academy student named Giselle, who battled her Cubone against Ash's Pikachu. A Cubone was among the four Pokémon that were causing trouble for Pikachu and co. during Pikachu's Vacation. A Cubone was helping Meowth preparing his party in Pichu Bros. in Party Panic. This Cubone played drums in Meowth's band and got easily sad and gloomy when Meowth chewed it out, but it was also easily consolable. In the Pokémon Origins television special, an orphaned Cubone is seen at the Pokémon House in Lavender Town, having been taken in by Mr. Fuji after his mother, a Marowak, was killed by Team Rocket. Hostile towards other humans because of this, he is soon able to make peace with his mother's ghost before helping the trainer Red to drive Team Rocket out of the Pokémon Tower.

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Cubone makes a cameo in Onix is On!, part of the Red, Green & Blue chapter, battling against Red's Bulbasaur as a Pewter Gym trainer's Pokémon. Crystal owns a Cubone, who has a star-shaped crack in its skull. Cubone's main role in the team is to take out targets from afar using its bone-based attacks.

Since it appeared in Pokémon Red and Blue, Cubone has received generally positive reception. It has appeared in several pieces of merchandise, including figurines, plush toys, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. It was also included as part of a more adult-oriented line of t-shirts in Japan, along with Mewtwo, Hypno, and Articuno. UGO Networks editor K. Thor Jensen noted that the Cubone t-shirt was a favourite among the staff.[8]

IGN readers ranked Cubone their 98th favourite Pokémon. An IGN editor called it "one of the most unique Pokémon."[9] Game Informer's O'Dell Harmon included it in his list of the top 50 best Pokémon only because of its backstory.[10] GamesRadar editor Raymond Padilla ranked Cubone third on their list of "Five unintentionally scary Pokémon", noting that the skull it wears on its head and the bone it carries around suggests cannibalism.[11] The staff also featured it in their list of the most disturbing Pokémon.[12] Fellow GamesRadar editor Brett Elston described it as disturbing, joking that Norman Bates from Psycho would be proud of Cubone.[13] He also described its back story as "heart-mangling", commenting that "we really need a telethon or something to save the poor Cubones".[14] A theory exists that Cubone is the child of a dead Kangaskhan due to its similar appearance to it. GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson supported this theory and thought that it was possible that some Pokémon species were mixed up and Kangaskhan was originally an evolution to Marowak. Missingno. and M are commonly believed to be the missing link between Cubone and Kangaskhans theory.[15] IGN editor "Pokémon of the Day Chick" gave Cubone extremely high praise, commenting that it was her "all-time undisputed favoritest snuggly-wuggly Pokémon." She added that its misgivings are forgiven by its cute appearance.[16] Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, cited Cubone as a popular Pokémon, commenting that Cubone resembled a small dinosaur with a skull helmet and appeared "mysterious".[17]

Marowak[edit]

Number: 105 Type: Ground Evolves from: Cubone Evolves into: None

Marowak (ガラガラ?, Garagara), known as the Bone Keeper Pokémon, is a portmanteau of marrow and whack (to strike), with "marrow" referring to the bone marrow within Marowak's skull-like head and wielded bone, and "whack" to represent Marowak's nature of striking its opponent with bones. Its Japanese name most likely refers to がらがら garagara, the onomatopoeia for "clattering," as in of bones.

A Marowak is, in essence, a larger, fiercer, more savage Cubone. Unlike its pre-evolutionary form, a Marowak's skull helmet is tightly fitted over its face, making removal more futile than it is with a Cubone. It is also more adept at using its bone club in attacks, and, most importantly, it no longer mourns over the loss of its mother, abandoning its plaintative and sorrowful spirit for one that can't be broken, no matter how many times it has been defeated. Where a Marowak collects its bones to use as weapons is a mystery, and, somewhere in the Pokémon world, there exists a graveyard where Marowak are laid to rest.

In Pokémon Red and Blue, a strange, unidentifiable Ghost appears at the top of Pokémon tower in Lavender Town, a place where Pokémon are laid to rest. Upon the usage of a Silph Scope, the Ghost turns into a Marowak, presumably the one Team Rocket killed earlier in the game. It cannot be captured, and once defeated, its ghost is laid to rest. The Cubone in Mr. Fuji's house is often considered the offspring of this Marowak. In the later games, it and Cubone can hold the item Thick Club, which doubles its physical attack power.

IGN noted that Marowak was a good choice for players early on in the game, calling it "decent".[18] IGN editor "Pokémon of the Day Chick" also praised Marowak, calling it a "fine specimen".[19] Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, discussed Marowak in a paragraph detailing death in the Pokémon world, calling its death in Red and Blue by the hands of Team Rocket as a notable exception to how a Pokémon would normally have a natural death.[20] A GamesRadar editor found it weird that Cubone was given the evolution of Marowak, since its mother was killed. They also theorized that Cubone was originally intended to evolve into Kangaskhan due to the similar physicality of Cubone and Kangaskhan. They also referenced a rumour that Missingno. was a Pokémon that was intended to tie all of them together.[21]

Hitmonlee[edit]

Number: 106 Type: Fighting Evolves from: Tyrogue Evolves into: None

Hitmonlee (サワムラー?, Sawamurā), known as the Kicking Pokémon, is a humanoid fighting type Pokémon with no discernible head or neck, instead having a face on his chest. Hitmonlee was originally known as "Sawamura" in Japanese, which is based on Japanese kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura.[22] Similarly, Hitmonlee's English name is derived from the name of martial artist Bruce Lee.[22] Hitmonlee's legs freely contract and stretch. Using these springlike legs, it bowls over foes with devastating kicks. When it runs, it can lengthen its legs to run more smoothly.[23] Its kicks are very powerful, as the sole of its heel can be as hard as a diamond.[24] With amazing balance, it can kick in any stance for long periods of time.[25] If its foe tries to get away, Hitmonlee will stretch its legs to take out the opponent.[26] To overcome fatigue after a battle, it rubs the muscles on its legs to loosen them.[27]

In Pokémon Gold and Silver, Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan receive a pre-evolution, Tyrogue, and a third counterpart, Hitmontop. Tyrogue evolves into one of the three depending on the levels of its Attack and Defense stats.[28] Hitmonlee appears in Super Smash Bros. as a summon-able Pokémon who will perform a kick dealing a great amount of damage on whoever it hits.[29] In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Hitmonlee, together with Bronzong and Regigigas, are statues that came alive to battle the player in Aegis Cave.[30]

In Hitmonlee's first anime appearance, Team Rocket stole a Hitmonlee in order to compete in the P1 Grand Prix. It defeated Brock's Geodude, and a Hitmonchan, before losing to Ash's Primeape.[31] A Hitmonlee owned by Corey was one of the Pokémon owned by that were captured and cloned by Mewtwo in Mewtwo Strikes Back.[32] The Hitmonlee clone was seen again in Mewtwo Returns.[33] The The Legend of Thunder! special starts off with the main character, Jimmy, battling a Hitmonlee with his Typhlosion.[34] In Pasta La Vista, Ash and May were lent a fighting dojo's Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan to battle with.[35] A Hitmonlee appeared under the ownership of Barry, where it fought against Paul's Ursaring, and lost.[36]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Hitmonlee first appears as a mysterious Pokémon aboard the S.S. Anne. Hitmonlee appears as one of Bruno's Pokémon, who destroyed Bill's house. Bruno explains that Hitmonlee's legs are so flexible, it is impossible to locate the position of its knees and attack them. Hitmonlee was seen as one of Chuck's Pokémon. In the Gym Leader faceoff, it used Mind Reader and Reversal to turn Blue's tactics against him. In Pokémon Gold & Silver: The Golden Boys, Gold borrows a Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan to use in a tournament.

IGN's Pokémon of the Day Chick described Hitmonlee as the "freakiest Fighting type to ever enter the fray", citing its lack of a distinguishable head, though noting that it seemed normal compared to Pokémon introduced in Pokémon Gold and Silver and beyond.[37] Joystiq editor David Hinkle called Hitmonlee "awesomely bizarre".[38]

Hitmonchan[edit]

Number: 107 Type: Fighting Evolves from: Tyrogue Evolves into: None

Hitmonchan (エビワラー?, Ebiwarā), known as the Punching Pokémon, is a humanoid fighting type Pokémon with two natural boxing glove shaped hands as well as training clothes. Hitmonchan was originally known as "Ebiwara" in Japanese, which is based on Japanese former two-time world flyweight boxing champion Hiroyuki Ebihara.[22] Similarly, Hitmonchan's English name is derived from the name of martial artist Jackie Chan.[22] Hitmonchan punches lightning fast, which makes it impossible to see.[39] It can punch through a concrete wall by using its arms in a drill-like fashion.[40] After three minutes of fighting, it needs to take a short break.[41] Spinning its arm before punching increases its strength.[42] The slightest touch of its punch could cause a burn.[43] This Pokémon has an indomitable spirit, and will never give up in the face of adversity.[44]

In Pokémon Gold and Silver, Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan are introduced to a pre-evolution, Tyrogue, and a third counterpart, Hitmontop. Tyrogue evolves into one of the three depending on the levels of its Attack and Defence stats.[28]

In Hitmonchan's first anime appearance, it lost a battle against a Hitmonlee stolen by Team Rocket in the P1 Grand Prix.[31] In Stage Fight, Hitmonchan was a major performer in a Pokémon show, where the plot was around a boxing match between him and a glove-wearing Machoke.[45] In Chikorita's Big Upset, a Hitmonchan was part of a group of Fighting-type Pokémon that roamed the streets of the city as a gang.[46] In Pasta La Vista, Ash and May were lent a fighting dojo's Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan to battle with.[35] Hitmonchan also appeared owned by Elite Four member, Bruno; Orange Islands Gym Leader, Rudy; and Karate King Kiyo.

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Bruno has a Hitmonchan which is capable of using Fire Punch, ThunderPunch, and Ice Punch at high caliber. Bruno remarks that Hitmonchan is like having three Pokémon in one. Crystal is seen with a Hitmonchan, which is capable of blindingly fast punching attacks. In Pokémon Gold & Silver: The Golden Boys, Gold borrows a Hitmonlee and Hitmonchan to use in a tournament.

Lickitung[edit]

Number: 108 Type: Normal Evolves from: None Evolves into: Lickilicky

Lickitung (ベロリンガ?, Beroringa), known as the Licking Pokémon, has soft, pink skin with semicircular yellow markings on its belly, fully circular markings on its knees, and a thick, powerful tail. It has small, beady eyes, and its hands have thumb-claws and circular yellow markings on the underside. The most famous feature Lickitung possesses is a long prehensile tongue, which it uses to manipulate objects and possibly to consume them.[47] The tongue is very likely connected to its huge tail, as when it is extended, the tail quivers.[48] Licks from its 6' 6" long tongue can paralyze foes.[49][50] Its saliva is gooey and sticks to everything.[51] They also like to lick unfamiliar things they come across, but get put-off by some sour substances.[52] Lickitung also uses its tongue to lick its body clean.[50]

In the anime, Jessie captured a Lickitung and used in the Princess Festival Tournament against Misty. Jessie usually used Lickitung as a last resort in battle. Lickitung licked Jessie's face on several occasions. Many episodes later, Jessie accidentally traded her Lickitung for a Wobbuffet. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Lickitung is one of the Pokémon seen in Gold's house. Later, a quad of Lickitung becomes attracted by the scent of Crystal's newly evolved Bayleef. In the Diamond and Pearl series, Diamond's map was stolen by a Lickitung and he attempts to capture one.

GamesRadar named Lickitung on their list of fugly Pokémon, noting that its large tongue is unacceptably gross.[53] IGN commented that Lickitung was both "cool" and "the most disturbing Pokemon in Blue/Red and Yellow," adding that there was something creepy about a "giant, pink and yellow hippo-like creature with a fat tail and a tongue that's twice as long as its body."[54] The Escapist editor John Funk noted that while some of the new Pokémon in Pokémon Black and White were weird, the first game featured weird Pokémon such as Lickitung, Magmar, and Jynx.[55] Eurogamer editor Luke Albiges called Lickitung "magnificent."[56] Time expressed disgust at Lickitung's tongue wrap, calling it "yucky."[6] Loredana Lipperini, author of Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi in discussing what made Pokémon popular, citing Lickitung's "extravagant" weapon, its tongue. She describes Lickitung as disgusting, comparing it to Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones.[57] Guy Kawasaki, author of The art of the start: the time-tested, battle-hardened guide for anyone starting anything, used Lickitung as an example of how the Pokémon series uses names that clearly explain what they are.[58]

Koffing[edit]

Number: 109 Type: Poison Evolves from: None Evolves into: Weezing
Main article: Koffing and Weezing

Dogas (ドガース Dogāsu?), known as the Poison Gas Pokémon, is a Poison-type Pokémon, filled with toxic gases which give them buoyancy and the ability to levitate. It resembles a large, floating blue-purple ball with various gas-emitting stud-like orifices surrounding its body save for its face, which appears as a smiling mouth with two eyes, and two small white upper fangs protruding from its mouth and a skull and crossbones symbol directly below said mouth.

Weezing[edit]

Number: 110 Type: Poison Evolves from: Koffing Evolves into: None
Main article: Koffing and Weezing

Matadogas (マタドガス Matadogasu?) is formed when two Koffings fuse together after their gases mix, and as one inflates, the other will deflate.[59] Both faces appear to be frowning, with the larger featuring two lower large fangs and two upper blunted teeth. On each, the skull has been changed to simpler oval, with the smaller lacking the crossbones.

Rhyhorn[edit]

Number: 111 Type: Ground/Rock Evolves from: None Evolves into: Rhydon

Rhyhorn (サイホーン Saihōn?, Sihorn), known as the Spikes Pokémon, is a rhinoceros like Pokémon with a rock like hide consisting of plates. Rhyhorn stands on all four legs and evolves into Rhydon. Rhyhorn is a portmanteau of rhinoceros (which it resembles) and horn. Its spelling is also influenced by the rock rhyolite. Its Japanese name is a portmanteau of sai (?), meaning rhinoceros and hōn (ホーン?), meaning horn.

A Rhyhorn's most well known method of attack is to charge straight into things (which is all it can do as its short legs make it hard for it to turn left or right). A charging Rhyhorn can knock over anything, from trailers to skyscrapers. Its hide is 1000 times harder than human bones. Because they have a one-track mind, Rhyhorn are the prime example of having "more brawn than brains", as they often charge head first into things for little or no reason and often forget why they're charging in the first place. Once a Rhyhorn starts charging, it will not stop until it becomes tired and it doesn't care what (or who) gets in its way. As a testament to how slow-witted it is, a Rhyhorn will charge headlong into a block of steel and not feel any pain until the day after it hit the steel block.

In Gold, Silver, and Crystal, Brock uses a Rhyhorn to battle. There is also a Rhyhorn in the Brock Gym Leader set of the trading card game.

The X and Y games mention a sport known as Rhyhorn racing, which possibly came about due to the speeds they can charge at. There is a Rhyhorn in front of the player character's house at Vaniville Town, and the player is able to ride one on Route 9, which is also called Spikes Passage.

Rhydon[edit]

Number: 112 Type: Ground/Rock Evolves from: Rhyhorn Evolves into: Rhyperior

Rhydon (サイドン Saidon?, Sidon), known as the Drill Pokémon, is a large, gray, bipedal Pokémon with features of dinosaurs and rhinoceroses. Rhydon’s most famous feature is the cream-colored, drill-like horn on its snout, although there are other protrusions on the head as well. These include the front-pointing crest extending from the middle of its head, two triangular, ear-like features to the sides of the crest, a wavy-shaped, also ear-like extension further down its head, and the spiky ridges on the sides of its mouth. It has a long tail with skinny, black stripes. Rhydon has a cream-colored stomach and a ridged back.

Rhydon was the first Pokémon to be created.[60]

Rhydon's drill-horn is capable of crushing uncut diamonds,[61] and it can knock down a building with one strike of its tail.[62] Rhydon's rocky hide is strong enough to withstand direct cannonball fire,[62] and serves as such effective protection that it makes Rhydon capable of living in molten lava up to 3,600 degrees.[63] However, its rugged hide also makes it insensitive.[64] Rhydon is apparently much smarter than its pre-evolution, evidenced by its ability to stand on its hind-legs.[65] Despite this, it is still very forgetful.

Rhydon's debut in the anime was in Showdown at Dark City, under the ownership of one of the trainers at Kas Gym. Rhydon's first major role was in Riddle Me This, being one of Blaine's Pokémon. Blaine used a Rhydon against Ash during the first battle for Ash's Volcano Badge. While normally tough against electric attacks, Rhydon was defeated when Ash's Pikachu struck Rhydon's horn, which acted like a lightning rod. Giovanni owns a Rhydon that he loaned to Jessie and James in The Battle of the Badge. Right on, Rhydon featured a Rhydon that knew how to use Surf. Rhydon also made a cameo appearance in Numero Uno Articuno as one of Noland's Pokémon.

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Rhydon debuts in the in its own round, Raging Rhydon, as Koga's Pokémon that is forced to evolve by its trainer with a mysterious injection. Rhydon is later seen as one of Giovanni's Pokémon, but is not seen battling. Blue captures a Rhydon outside the Viridian Gym. He uses it to defeat Chuck, as well as Orm. Near the end of the FireRed and LeafGreen saga, Blue remarks on a footnote Giovanni included in his handbook: Rhydon possibly possessed a stronger form. This is a reference to Rhydon's new evolution, Rhyperior. Gold encounters a wild Rhydon during his race with Whitney. It was hunting down a Sudowoodo hiding from it, and kidnapped Whitney when she interfered with her Miltank, breaking her arm in the process. Gold tells Sudowoodo to stand up for itself and helps Sudowoodo defeat the Rhydon.

IGN listed him as one of the best Rock types alongside Aerodactyl and Golem. They described him as "rather strong," but also a Pokémon that only patient players would like.[66] IGN editor "Pokemon of the Day Chick" criticized Rhydon for its horrible typing, but stated "I quite frankly like Rhydon as a Pokemon", citing its "incredible physical stats".[67] GamesRadar described it as "strong, tough and slow as molasses", and called it bizarre due to it being able to learn Surf.[68]

Chansey[edit]

Number: 113 Type: Normal Evolves from: Happiny Evolves into: Blissey

Chansey (ラッキー Rakkī?, Lucky), known as the Egg Pokémon, have pink, egg-shaped bodies. They have hair-like outgrowths on the side of their heads. Chansey have stubby limbs, a short tail, and a pouch that holds an egg. Chansey is a female-only species with no male counterpart. Extremely rare in the wild, Chansey is said to bring happiness to those who are lucky enough to capture it.[69] Chansey lays a new egg every day. The egg is extremely nutritious and tasty.[70] A kind-hearted and charitable Pokémon, Chansey will share its eggs with injured Pokémon it may come across.[71] Chansey walks carefully to protect its egg from damage but can be startlingly fast when it must run from danger.[72] Chansey is used as nurses in The Pokémon Centers,

Since appearing in the Pokémon series, Chansey has received generally positive reception. It has been featured in several pieces of merchandise, including figures, plush toys, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Its design was used for Pop Tarts along with three other Pokémon.[73] Irish Independent News editor Sarah Chalmers described Chansey as "cute and cuddly", commenting that she would fit in well in My Little Pony.[74] IGN described Chansey as odd in both appearance and nature, citing its high health but low defense for the latter. They comment that it is hard to recommend Chansey unless the player is intending on annoying their opponent.[75]

Tangela[edit]

Number: 114 Type: Grass Evolves from: None Evolves into: Tangrowth

Tangela (モンジャラ?, Monjara), known as the Vine Pokémon, is a corrupted form of the word "tangle", which is both what it appears visually and what its vines often do to opponents. Its Japanese name comes from mojamoja (もじゃもじゃ?), which refers to shagginess. It is unknown what this Pokémon looks like underneath its vines, since only its eyes and two little red boots are visible. If a vine is lost or damaged it will grow back the next day. The vines always jiggle, which easily unnerves its foes. In Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, Tangela can evolve into a new Pokémon called Tangrowth. This happens when Tangela levels up after learning the move Ancientpower.

Tangela has made three major appearances in the anime. Gym Leader Erika used one against Ash's Pokémon in episode #26 (Pokémon Scent-sation). In Episode 227, For Ho-Oh the Bell Tolls, after Team Rocket steals a set of bells, Tangela fight to protect them alongside other Pokémon before Suicune restores order and calms them down. In episode #341, "Gulpin it Down", a police officer used a Tangela, along with Parasect and Meganium, against some troublesome Gulpin.

GameDaily ranked Tangela sixth on their list of the "Top 10 Weirdest Looking Pokémon", noting its vines more readily resembled worms, and its concealed "face".[76]

Kangaskhan[edit]

Number: 115 Type: Normal Does not evolve

Kangaskhan (ガルーラ Garūra?, Garura), known as the Parent Pokémon, is a combination of the word kangaroo and the name of the famous ruler of the Mongol Empire, Genghis Khan. Its Japanese name is derived from "kangaroo" (カンガルー kangarū?) and "ruler" (ルーラー rūrā?). Unlike real kangaroos, Kangaskhan do not hop and are dinosaurian in appearance, though they do have pouches in which they carry their infants. A female-only species, Kangaskhan lives a strict maternal lifestyle, as the infants do not leave the pouch until they are three years old and until then, the mother will fight to protect its young, no matter how injured it is during the battle. In Pokémon X and Y, Kangaskhan is one of the few Pokémon to receive a Mega Evolution. While the mother remains unchanged, the child becomes slightly older and leaves the pouch to battle alongside its mother, allowing Mega Kangaskhan to attack twice in a single turn.

In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Team Go-Getters Out Of The Gate!, Kangaskhan is dubbed an "aunt" and she gives Squirtle, Charmander and Chikorita red Pecha scarves and Corsola twigs as useful items. She has a son who is in her pouch and when he comes out, he utters with great support. In the Mystery Dungeon games, Kangaskhan provides an item storage service for the player.

A theory among fans is that Cubone is the child of a dead Kangaskhan due to its similar appearance to it. GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson supported this theory, and thought that it was possible that some Pokémon species were mixed up and Kangaskhan was originally an evolution to Marowak. They also referenced a rumour that Missingno. was a Pokémon that was intended to tie all of them together. They also noted that it was odd that when a Kangaskhan is born in the video games, it has a baby in its pouch. Kangaskhan was also chosen as their Pokémon of the week, though Gudmundson noted that she would never use it and found it creepy that its baby never grew up. Another GamesRadar editor found its name to be a pun of Genghis Khan, but decided that it was based on a kangaroo after another person told him that.[21]

Horsea[edit]

Number: 116 Type: Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Seadra

Horsea (タッツー Tattsū?, Tattu), known as the Dragon Pokémon, is a small, light blue seahorse with tiny scales. Its belly and fin are cream colored. Its tail is always curled up tightly,[77] and it has a single fin on its back that is used for locomotion in the water. If they sense trouble, they spit ink towards the instigator.[78] If the enemy is too strong, it quickly swims to safety.[79] Horsea also spit ink to shoot down flying bugs for food.[80] It has developed fins allow it to swim backwards when needed.[81] When they are in a safe location, they can be seen playfully tangling their tails together.[82] Horsea like swimming around, making them adept in using their fin. If the ocean current turns fast, however, Horsea will anchor itself by wrapping its tail around rocks or coral to prevent being washed away.[83] Horsea makes its nest in shady coral reefs,[84] and eats small insects and moss off of rocks.[83]

In the anime, Misty noticed an injured Horsea in the coast, and caught it. Horsea has trouble functioning on land, so she didn't use it much in her adventures. However, when it was used, it tended to be very resourceful – using ink to draw pictures or leave trails. Near the end of the Kanto adventures, Horsea was feeling ill because Misty wasn't letting it out enough to get any exercise. With no ocean nearby, Misty decided to take it home to Cerulean City, where it could play and swim in her Gym's many aquariums. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Green had a Horsea on her team, using it in her crafty tricks such as cloaking areas with SmokeScreen or leaving ink trails. It was later transferred to Silver, and eventually evolved into Kingdra.

Seadra[edit]

Number: 117 Type: Water Evolves from: Horsea Evolves into: Kingdra

Seadra (シードラ Shīdora?), known as the Dragon Pokémon, is a primarily blue sea horse Pokémon. It has a long snout and a number of spikes on its head, to the sides and on the top. Its torso is covered with rough, cream-colored scales. Seadra's pectoral fins have sharp, pointed, cream-colored tips from which it exudes venom.[85] It also has a large tail which is generally coiled up. Seadra can swim facing backwards by rapidly flapping its fins and its coiled tail.[86] Seadra hook their tail to coral reefs before sleeping to stay in place.[87] Seadra catches its prey by spinning its body to create large whirlpools which tire its foes. Seadra will then swallow the victim whole using its long snout.[88] After the female Seadra gives birth, the male Seadra will take care of the young and its nest. It will attack those who venture too near to its children.[89] It can be found in Kanto, Johto, Hoenn, and Sinnoh.

In the anime, Ash battled a Seadra in his first battle in the Indigo League. Cissy used a Seadra while Ash was participating in her target test in Fit to be Tide. A Seadra was one of the Pokémon that were captured and cloned by Mewtwo in Mewtwo Strikes Back. The Seadra clone is seen again in Mewtwo Returns. Juan, the leader of the Sootopolis Gym, also owns a Seadra. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Silver had a Seadra as a part of his team, although it was not shown. During the events of Volume 9, Silver secretly sends Seadra to Gold via trade for his Poliwhirl, triggering Seadra's evolution into Kingdra.

Goldeen[edit]

Number: 118 Type: Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Seaking

Goldeen (トサキント?, Tosakinto), known as the Goldfish Pokémon, is a white fish Pokémon with orange markings on its tail, fins and along the top of its body. Goldeen's tail fin is admired by many for its beauty as it billows very much like a ballroom dress.[90] Goldeen has a large horn on its forehead, which is smaller in females. Goldeen can be seen swimming upstream at a speed of five knots.[91] Goldeen love to frolic and dance in bodies of water and dislike being kept in captivity. A Goldeen in an aquarium will use its powerful horn to smash its way to freedom.[92] To attract mates, Goldeen swim gracefully in the water.[93] Goldeen then lay their eggs in large groups at the tops of rivers.[94] Goldeen are a very common sight in any body of fresh water. It is fished up in Kanto, Johto, Hoenn and Sinnoh.

Goldeen first appeared in Pokémon Red and Blue, and have appeared in every main title since, including remakes of Red and Blue titled Pokémon Yellow and Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen. Outside of the main series, Goldeen has appeared in the Pokémon Pinball titles, Pokémon Ranger, the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon titles, Pokémon Trozei!, Pokémon Rumble, Pokémon Snap, and Pokémon Channel. Goldeen also appears in the Super Smash Bros. series, using Splash (even though Magikarp is more known for using the move) when released from a Poké Ball, which has no effect on the battle. On the official blog, Super Smash Bros. lead designer Masahiro Sakurai commented that Goldeen appearing at the most critical of times is in keeping with Murphy's Law.[95]

In the anime, Misty owns a Goldeen that is not really used for battles, but to look for things underwater. It first appeared in Pokémon Emergency! used to distract Team Rocket. Goldeen has also had many other small appearances in the anime, such as one belonging to Gym Leader Juan.

Goldeen's appearance in Super Smash Bros. Brawl has received some criticism.[96][97] IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that while she assumed that it was modeled after a goldfish due to its "uninspired name", she felt that its tail more closely resembled a koi. She also wrote that it was a "pretty Pokémon" but also that she has bad stats and is "one of the single most boring ever to be imagined".[98] GamesRadar's Brett Elston summed up Goldeen as rather unremarkable and wrote "What else is there to say? It's a goldfish."[99] Author Loredana Lipperini compared Goldeen to the goldfish from the Disney film Fantasia.[100] Destructoid's Jim Sterling criticized the developers and wrote "if you're just going to slap a horn on a goldfish, why even bother?".[101]

Seaking[edit]

"Seaking" redirects here. For other uses, see Sea King.
Number: 119 Type: Water Evolves from: Goldeen Evolves into: None

Seaking (アズマオウ Azumaō?, Azumao), known as the Goldfish Pokémon, resembles a koi or goldfish, as it is a big orange colored fish with white and black markings. It also has a horn on its head that is sharp like a drill,[102] two big dark eyes, and pink lips with two small, sharp fangs. In the spawning season, they gather from all over to travel upriver,[103] which colors the rivers a brilliant red.[104] During this time, the Seaking males can be seen performing their courtship dances to woo Seaking females.[105] The male also uses its powerful horn to bore holes in riverbed boulders, so as to keep the eggs safe,[106] although in other seasons it will make and live in their own nests. The male and female will take turns patrolling around their nest and eggs, and the guarding of eggs by the Seaking goes on for over a month until the eggs hatch.[107] Seaking was originally called Neptune in the beta, after the Roman god of the sea.

Seaking was featured as an Internet meme sarcastically depicting an angry Seaking with the caption "F___ yeah, Seaking!".[108] Bitmob's Chas Guidry wrote that its Dream World incarnation would cause the meme to "lose its punchline" due to its ability to resist Electric attacks. He added that this new ability is giving "some of the attention he's longed for since 1996."[108] IGN gave the same criticism it gave Goldeen to Seaking though they added that it had a decent attack boost. They also wrote that while it was a little better than Wartortle, Seaking evolved too late, around where Wartortle would evolve into Blastoise.[109] IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Seaking for both being a disappointing evolution compared to the evolution from Magikarp to Gyarados and for being "unimaginative in terms of both looks".[98]

Staryu[edit]

Number: 120 Type: Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Starmie

Staryu (ヒトデマン Hitodeman?), known as the Star Shape Pokémon, is a basic, water-type Pokémon which resembles a starfish. At its core is a red jewel like Starmie's, but Staryu's is circular. The jewel acts as the Pokémon's eye, and flashes whenever it talks. Instead of speaking using syllables within its own name, Staryu makes grunting/gargling noises, probably because it doesn't actually have a mouth. It has the power to regenerate its points if any of them break off. It evolves into Starmie once a Water Stone has been used on it. It can use several Water-type moves, as well as its signature Rapid Spin. Staryu also appears in the Super Smash Bros. series, using Swift when released from a Poké Ball.

GamesRadar's Brett Elston wrote that Staryu was "probably doubly familiar to fans of the anime and game" due to its common use by the character Misty.[110] Destructoid's Jim Sterling, however, named Staryu one of the 30 "rubbish Pokémon" and wrote that he "can't see the appeal in this thing at all" and that it is "clearly one for the girls".[111]

Starmie[edit]

Number: 121 Type: Water/Psychic Evolves from: Staryu Evolves into: None

Starmie (スターミー Sutāmī?), known as the Mysterious Pokémon, resembles a sea star. Its body is violet with a gold formation on its front. Starmie appears to have a second star growing on its back, which is semi-attached, being able to spin 360°. It uses its second star to propel itself through the water and even to launch out of the water and fly through the air for short periods of time. Starmie has a red jewel core, which resembles a cut precious stone, and seems to shine with the seven colors of the rainbow when looked at from different angles,[112] but usually shows up red more than any other color. It can also emit electrical waves from the core that are powerful enough to reach the furthest parts of the universe.[113]

IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that Starmie was "probably my single favorite Pokemon that I've never trained" which she explained could be due to its sudden popularity in Gold and Silver.[114] Destructoid's Jim Sterling felt that he added that Staryu's evolution into Starmie was pointless and wrote "because we need two boring starfish Pokémon, don't we?".[115]

Mr. Mime[edit]

Number: 122 Type: Psychic/Fairy Evolves from: Mime Jr. Evolves into: None
Main article: Mr. Mime

Mr. Mime (バリヤード Bariyādo?, Barriered) are granted the art of miming at a young age, but as they mature, they gain the ability to make invisible objects by emitting energy from their fingers and minutely vibrating their fingertips to harden the air around them and form a wall.[116][117][118] Barriers generated this way can repel harsh attacks,[119] and its gestures and motions can convince watchers that something unseeable actually exists; once this is achieved, the perceived item will materialize.[120] Mr. Mime are very prideful of their pantomime acts, and will heavily slap anyone that interrupts them while miming.[121]

Scyther[edit]

Number: 123 Type: Bug/Flying Evolves from: None Evolves into: Scizor

Scyther (ストライク Sutoraiku?, Strike) resembles a primarily green, human-sized praying mantis with accents of cream coloration. It has large, blade-like forearms and a pair of cream-colored wings. Its head is reptilian rather than insect in shape, with three small points, and its feet possess three claws. The female of the species have larger abdomens. Using its agility and speed, Scyther can create the illusion that there are more than one of itself.[122] It leaps out of the grass and slices prey with its scythes.[123] Scyther's coloring renders it invisible in grass.[124] Scyther sharpens its scythes by cutting hard objects[125]

Scyther was one of 150 different designs conceived by Game Freak's character development team and finalized by Ken Sugimori for the first generation of Pocket Monsters games Red and Green, which were localized outside of Japan as Pokémon Red and Blue.[126][127] Originally called "Strike" in Japanese, Nintendo decided to give the various Pokémon species "clever and descriptive names" related to their appearance or features when translating the game for western audiences as a means to make the characters more relatable to American children.[6] Scyther's English name comes from the word "scythe," a tool used for cutting.

In the video game series, Scyther can be acquired from either from the Safari Zone, or a trade in with Game Corner points in Pokémon Red, Pokémon Yellow, and Pokémon FireRed. In Pokémon Gold and Silver, and their remakes Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, Scyther is found in the National Park's Bug Catching Contest. Outside of the main titles, it appears in Pokémon Snap, Pokémon Puzzle League, the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games, and the Pokémon Ranger games. In Pokémon Stadium 2, Scyther stars in a mini-game alongside Pinsir called "Clear Cut Challenge", where each player chops a falling log for each round of the game.

In the anime, Tracey Sketchit catches a Scyther in the Orange Islands. It is aged and was recently removed from its clan by a younger, stronger Scyther. The Bug Pokémon reconcile their differences through the interference of Team Rocket, and Tracey's Scyther is allowed to leave with him with its conflicts fully resolved. Tracey's Scyther is incredibly strong-willed, preferring to keep watch over the travelers while they sleep, as opposed to staying in its Pokéball. In the Johto arc, the Azalea Town gym leader, Bugsy, used a Scyther against Ash, which used Swords Dance to repel fire attacks. Ash had Cyndaquil jump and use a Flamethrower from above Scyther when he was using Sword Dance to beat him. In Pokémon Adventures, Scyther is the first Pokémon Blue received. It is seen to have evolved into a Scizor prior to the events of Volume 9. He brings it on his journey to the Sevii Islands. Bugsy is seen with a Scyther in the Gym Leader faceoff.

Since it appeared in the Pokémon series, Scyther has been met with generally positive reception. Scyther has been featured in different kinds of merchandise, including the Pokémon Trading Card Game and various figurines.[128][129] IGN called them as "so popular it's sickening" and praised its design, naming Scyther the best of the Bug-type Pokémon to appear in Pokémon Red and Blue and made stronger with its evolved form.[130][131] IGN stated that they used it just because of its appearance.[66] GamesRadar described Scyther as one of their office's favorite characters.[132] GameSpy's Justin Leeper wrote that Scyther was better for "more macho gamers".[133]

Jynx[edit]

Number: 124 Type: Ice/Psychic Evolves from: Smoochum Evolves into: None
Main article: Jynx

Jynx (ルージュラ Rū-jura?, Rougela), known as the "Human Shape" Pokémon, is a female-only species that resemble short, large women. Originally portrayed with a black face and hands, Jynx's design was changed to purple coloration after criticism.[134] In addition Jynx have large pink lips, saucer-like eyes, white arms, and long, blond hair. The "clothes" they appear to wear are actually part of their body, resembling a circular red bra and skirt. Jynx have no visible feet, and in the games leave no footprints.

Electabuzz[edit]

Number: 125 Type: Electric Evolves from: Elekid Evolves into: Electivire

Electabuzz (エレブー Erebu?, Eleboo), known as the Electric Pokémon, is a slightly humanoid and partly feline creature covered in yellow fur with black stripes, one of which is shaped like a lightning bolt. It has a long, cat-like tail. The three toes on Electabuzz's feet are arranged like that of a bird's foot, but its hands have a human appearance, with five fingers on each hand. Electabuzz has two sharp fangs and a pair of antennae. When it is dark out, Electabuzz's entire body gives off a bluish-white glow.[135] During thunderstorms, they compete with each other to reach heights likely to be stricken by lightning bolts.[136] When two Electabuzz meet, they communicate their feelings by touching and controlling the electric currents.[137] Electabuzz normally reside in power plants, as they use the electricity to feed themselves,[138] and can sometimes wander into cities and cause major black-outs.[139]

Electabuzz gains a pre evolved from, Elekid, in Pokémon Gold and Silver, and an evolution, Electivire, in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. A promotional Electabuzz TCG card was handed out at theatrical showings of Pokémon: The First Movie.

Electabuzz first appeared in the anime in Showdown at Dark City. It is the Kas Gym's primary Pokémon and was used in the feuds that the Kas and Yas Gyms were having. Rudy, the Trovita Island Gym Leader, used an Electabuzz against Ash's Pikachu during their Gym Battle in Misty Meets Her Match. In Enter The Dragonite, Drake, the leader of the Orange Crew, used his Electabuzz to fight Bulbasaur and Charizard. Drake's Electabuzz defeated Ash's Bulbasaur before being defeated by Ash's Charizard. In Smells Like Team Spirit, Paul's Elekid evolves into Electabuzz in the Tag Battle Competition. In Lost Leader Strategy! it was revealed that Paul had left his Electabuzz under the care of his brother, Reggie. It then returned to Paul's team after the events of Enter Galactic!.

In Pokémon Adventures Electabuzz debuts in its own round, Buzz Off, Electabuzz!, as the main Pokémon of Lt. Surge.

Magmar[edit]

Number: 126 Type: Fire Evolves from: Magby Evolves into: Magmortar

Magmar (ブーバー Būbā?, Boober), known as the Spitfire Pokémon, is born in an active volcano.[140] If a Magmar finds itself in a cold place, it will try to make it more habitable by blowing scorching flames around.[141] It has the ability to expel orange-colored fire from every part of its body. Magmar cloaked in flames resemble a big ball of fire.[140] Together with its matching body coloration, Magmar can quite easily hide itself among flames, escaping detection.[142] If Magmar is actually wounded, it can heal itself by dipping its wounds in lava.[143]

In the anime, Magmar was first seen owned by the Gym Leader Blaine, in which it fought Ash's Charizard. Different Magmar are used by Gary Oak in the Silver Conference, and by Paul. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, two Magmar were seen briefly burning up the Pewter Museum, where Red battled them using his Sandshrew before Giovanni finished them off with his Cloyster.

Since appearing in Red and Blue, Magmar has received generally mixed reception. GamesRadar included it on their list of "fugly Pokémon", noting that its forehead resembles a butt.[144] GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson included Magmar in her list of "the most overused Pokémon designs" as an example of a Pokémon that has "duck-like features" and wrote "Oh Magmar, what are we going to do with you?".[145] The Escapist's John Funk commented that while the Pokémon in Pokémon Black and White look weird, Red and Blue had weird Pokémon too, citing Magmar as well as Jynx and Lickitung.[146] Official Nintendo Magazine's readers named Magmar the eighth best Fire type Pokémon; ONM editor wrote that it was a "cross between a mythical Salamander and a duck" and "an awesome Pokémon".[147] Destructoid's Jim Sterling included Magmar in his list of 30 "rubbish Pokémon" in Pokémon Red and Blue. He cited its "convoluted" design and that it "doesn't look even slightly decent". He also wrote that its appearance made it look like it had Down's syndrome and that its head resembles a butt.[148] In another article, Sterling cited Magmar as an example of Blue's inferior selection of Pokémon compared to Red.[149]

Pinsir[edit]

Number: 127 Type: Bug, Bug/Flying (Mega Pinsir) Does not evolve

Pinsir (カイロス Kairosu?, Kailios), known as the Stag Beetle Pokémon, has a brown body with a large pair of white horns that are dotted with small spikes. Pinsir has short legs with three toes each and skinny, three-clawed arms. Its mouth has long, flat teeth that are arranged vertically rather than horizontally. Pinsir is cold-blooded. Pinsir's horns have enough crushing power to shatter thick logs and allow it to lift things twice its own weight.[150]

Pinsir's movements are more sluggish when exposed to cold weather, so they hide in burrows, treetops or tree roots during chilly nights.[151] Pinsir are known to dig holes with their horns to sleep in.[152] Pinsir are mostly found in jungle-like areas, but have also been imported into Kanto's Safari Zone and the National Park of Johto during bug-contests. Sinnoh also offers a good habitat for them. Pinsir eats prey, gripping it with its pincers until the prey is torn in half. If it fails to crush the victim in its pincers, it will swing it around and toss it hard.[153]

Pinsir is a rare Pokémon found in every main series game except for Red, FireRed, and Diamond, being a version exclusive. In Pokémon Stadium 2, Pinsir stars in its own minigame, alongside Scyther called "Clear Cut Challenge". Players must cut a tree trunk where a white line appears, getting more points for accuracy.[154] In the anime, Pinsir first appeared in Challenge of the Samurai, in which a samurai used it to battle against Ash. In A Sappy Ending, Pinsir were being driven into a forest that was Heracross territory because Team Rocket was stealing the sap from the trees that were in their territory. Pinsir also has many minor appearances, such as in Mewtwo Strikes Back, used to battle Ash's Pikachu.

GamesRadar listed Pinsir on their list of "The most disturbing Pokemon of all time", citing the violent way it deals with its prey.[155]

Tauros[edit]

Number: 128 Type: Normal Does not evolve

Tauros (ケンタロス Kentarosu?, Kentauros) is a bull known for its violent urges and rowdy, aggressive disposition in general, as supplied by a tremendous amount of natural stamina. Any given Tauros finds it impossible to keep up its spirits in life without near-constant rampaging. It always tries to find opponent Pokémon to battle outright to serve this purpose, but if it is alone, it will instead concentrate on charging at and knocking down thick trees to calm itself. By locking horns with other Tauros, it fights to assert dominance in a herd. The protector of the herd is usually noted by battle torn horns. As Tauros is based on a bull, it is a male-only Pokémon; its female equivalent, introduced in the next generation, is the more cowlike Miltank.

Tauros has a special habit that specifically affects its ability to battle, both in the wild and in trainer-directed Pokémon battles: It whips itself with its three long snapping tails. When it targets an enemy, it heightens its will to battle by whipping its own backside with its tails before charging at full speed.

Tauros is based on the zodiac horoscope Taurus. Taurus is the third of the zodiac horoscopes, which is the reason why the Pokémon Tauros has three tails and three orbs on its forehead.[citation needed]

In the anime, Ash Ketchum captures a herd of thirty Tauros in the Safari Zone (though the episode which features this was banned in America due to its flagrant gun use and politically incorrect humor). They usually remain in Professor Oak's fields, Ash occasionally picks one up for various tournaments or important battles.

IGN listed Tauros as one of the best Normal types, calling it the most underrated Pokémon in the game.[66]

Magikarp[edit]

Number: 129 Type: Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Gyarados
Main article: Magikarp

Magikarp (コイキング Koikingu?, Koiking) is a reddish-orange, medium-sized fish. Its notable characteristics include large, heavy scales. Its fins are primarily white, but it has two stiff, three-peaked fins on its back and stomach which are both yellow. It also has long barbels, which are white on females and tan on males. Although this Pokémon is capable of surviving in even the most polluted ponds,[156] it is usually overlooked by trainers because it is pathetically weak.[157] Even in the heat of battle it will do nothing but flop around. They are normally seen using Splash, which is unusual, as it makes them easy targets to predators.[158] Before the species multiplied, it is believed that the ancestors of Magikarp were actually much stronger than the Magikarp seen today,[159] and this belief has led scientists to research this species.[160] Long-lived Magikarp are able to utilize their immense splashing power to leap high enough to jump mountains.[161] Magikarp is found in many bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers, and ponds.[162] It is not a strong swimmer, and currents in the water will sweep it downstream.[163]

Though it is called "the world's weakest Pokémon", Magikarp does not have the lowest Attack stat of all Pokémon. Both Shuckle and Chansey have a mere base 5 Attack.

Gyarados[edit]

Number: 130 Type: water/dark (as Mega Gyarados) Evolves from: Magikarp Evolves into: None
Main article: Gyarados

Gyarados (ギャラドス Gyaradosu?), the Atrocious Pokémon, is a large dragon-like Pokémon most similar in appearance to those seen in Chinese mythology. The concept of Magikarp evolving into Gyarados is based on the ancient Chinese tradition that the carp would transform into a dragon after swimming up a waterfall and leaping over the Dragon's Gate. Its serpentine body is largely blue, but its underbelly is yellow. It has four white fins down its back, and a large and gaping mouth. Gyarados is known for its fierce temper and wanton destructive tendencies. Once it has worked itself into a frenzy, it will not calm until everything around it is destroyed,[164] and can even go on for a whole month.[165] This violent nature is attributed to the dramatic structural changes its brain undergoes during evolution.[166] During times of human conflict, Gyarados are said to appear, burning entire cities down to the ground.[167] Gyarados usually live in large bodies of water, such as lakes and ponds or even seas and oceans.

Lapras[edit]

Number: 131 Type: Water/Ice Does not evolve
Main article: Lapras

Lapras (ラプラス Rapurasu ?, Laplace), known as the Transport Pokémon, is a large sea creature which resembles a plesiosaur. Early on in the production of the American version of Pokémon Red and Blue, Lapras was originally named Ness, as an homage to the Loch Ness Monster. It has four flippers, however its front ones are notably larger than its hind flippers. It has a long neck, and large black eyes. Lapras has unusual curled ears and a short horn in the middle of its forehead. The majority of its body is blue, while its underside is a light cream color. Its most distinguishing feature is the heavy shell on its back, which is largely dotted with blunt knobs. Lapras is most known for its fondness of moving people and Pokémon across bodies of water.[168] Some Lapras are able to develop Psychic abilities such as telepathy,[169] which makes them able to understand human speech.[170] They keep track of their fellow pod members through use of high-pitched songs they constantly sing,[171] much like whales. Unfortunately, they are very docile and do not like to fight, and this has made them an easy target for hunters,[172] which has made them very rare in the wild, due to being over hunted.[173]

Ditto[edit]

Number: 132 Type: Normal Does not evolve

Ditto (メタモン?, Metamon) has the form of an amorphous blob with a simplistic face. Ditto is pink and is able to rearrange its cellular structure into anything at will, but it usually changes into any nearby Pokémon. It takes on the exact form of the Pokémon and can use all of its abilities. The only things that can make it change back are being defeated, returning to a Pokéball, and the Ditto laughing. During the night, it transforms into a rock to avoid being attacked. If it tries to transform from memory, or if it is inexperienced, it will likely mess up on certain details such as leaving its own face or staying its own size. The only other Pokémon capable of transforming are Smeargle and the legendary Pokémon Mew. Originally called "Metamon" in Japanese, Nintendo decided to give the various Pokémon species "clever and descriptive names" related to their appearance or features when translating the game for western audiences as a means to make the characters more relatable to American children.[6]

Ditto first appeared in Pokémon Red and Blue and appeared in every main Pokémon title since. It gained a major upgrade in Pokémon Gold and Silver where it was given the unique ability to breed with any Pokémon.[98] It gained another major upgrade in Pokémon Black and White where its Dream World form had the Imposter ability to automatically transform into the opposing Pokémon upon entering battle unlike before, where it had to use a turn and risk being knocked out in the process.[108] It also appeared in other Pokémon titles, including Pokémon Snap, Pokémon Channel, Pokémon Pinball, Pokémon Trozei!, the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon titles, Pokémon Ranger: Guardian Signs, and Pokémon Rumble. In Super Smash Bros. Melee, it was revealed that it was originally meant to be one of the Pokémon to come out of a Poké Ball, but was cut during development for unknown reasons. However, when a player selects "Random" as their player during Tournament Mode, a picture of a Ditto can be seen, as opposed to the question mark used in versus mode.[citation needed] Ditto are able to breed even with some Pokémon that have no gender, such as Starmie and Metagross.

In the anime, two Ditto are owned by Duplica, a girl who can easily imitate people. The first Ditto is used to help her run a theater. At first it cannot correctly transform its face, but with the help of Team Rocket, it overcomes that barrier. The second Ditto, "Mini-Dit", cannot change its size at all. Ditto is voiced by Rachael Lillis in 4Kids' dub and by Michele Knotz in TPCI's dub.

Pokémon: The Electric Tale of Pikachu manga author Toshihiro Ono cited Ditto as one of his favorite characters to draw for the series, describing it as "easy to draw".[174] Newsday's Erik Holm called Ditto a popular Pokémon.[175] In an interview with G4's Raymond Padilla, Metal Gear Solid series creator Hideo Kojima noted Ditto as his favorite Pokémon.[176] IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that while Ditto was "utterly useless" in Red and Blue, it "slammed to the forefront of popularity" in Gold and Silver due to its ability to breed with any Pokémon.[177] Destructoid's Jim Sterling listed Ditto as one of the 30 "rubbish" Pokémon in Red and Blue. He called Ditto "totally forgettable, not worth mentioning".[178] GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson named Ditto their Pokémon of the week and wrote that it gets "used and abused more than any other Pokémon".[179] She also featured the theory that Ditto was a "failed clone" of Mew, due to similar colours, both weighing 8.8 pounds, and both learning Transform.[180]

Eevee[edit]

Number: 133 Type: Normal Evolves from: None Evolves into: Vaporeon, Jolteon, Flareon, Espeon, Umbreon, Leafeon, Glaceon, or Sylveon
Main article: Eevee

Eevee (イーブイ Ībui?, Eievui), known as the Evolution Pokémon,[181] is best known for its unstable genetic code which allows it to change and mutate into different forms depending on its environment.[182][183] As a result of its evolution, Eevee would become better suited to living in its surrounding environment.[184] All of Eevee's evolutions are of unique typing in comparison to each other. In Pokémon Red and Green, the player was able to evolve his or her Eevee into one its first three evolutions (Vaporeon, Jolteon, or Flareon) by the use of an elemental stone (though only one can be obtained at a time). Starting from Pokémon Gold and Silver, the player could further evolve his or her Eevee into either an Espeon or an Umbreon by achieving maximum happiness (though the evolution depended on what time of day it was as Eevee evolved into Espeon at daytime while Eevee evolved into Umbreon at night). The next two evolutions of Eevee were obtainable upon the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Leafeon, Eevee's Grass-type evolution is obtainable upon leveling up near a moss rock, meanwhile Eevee's Ice type evolution, Glaceon, is achieved by leveling up near an ice rock.[185] These rocks are found in the Sinnoh and Unova regions. With the release of the new Fairy Type in Pokémon X and Y, a new evolution of Eevee, Sylveon, became available by leveling up an Eevee while knowing a Fairy-type move.

Vaporeon[edit]

Number: 134 Type: Water Evolves from: Eevee Evolves into: None

Vaporeon (シャワーズ Shawāzu?, Showers), known as the Bubble Jet Pokémon, is one of the evolutions of Eevee that is caused by radiation from a Water Stone. Its counterparts are Flareon and Jolteon, which evolve from Eevee using a Fire Stone or Thunderstone respectively. Vaporeon's body is light-blue and has a white collar; it has yellow ears made of webbing and a fin on its head resembling ears, and a pointed pattern of dark blue on its head that encompasses the backs of its ears and head-fin. It also has blue ridges that run down the length of its spine and on to its tail-fin, and the paw pads on its hind feet are dark blue, like the ridges.

Vaporeon's molecular structure is close to water,[186] and because of this, Vaporeon are highly adapted to aquatic life. It can manipulate water molecules,[187] melt into water,[186] walk on water, and breathe underwater. Many people who first see this Pokémon believe it is a mermaid.[188] When Vaporeon's fins begin to vibrate, it is said to be a sign that rain will come within a few hours.[189] Vaporeon are always found close to water, and prefer large, clean lakes.[188]

Vaporeon first appeared in the anime in the episode The Battling Eevee Brothers, under the ownership of Rainer.[190] Vaporeon was also seen under the ownership of one the Kimono Sisters in Trouble's Brewing and Espeon Not Included. An old woman named Galea owned a Vaporeon in On Olden Pond. Vaporeon was also shown in Pokémon: The First Movie and later got cloned. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Red temporarily controlled a Vaporeon, which was switching between Eevee's evolved forms.

Kotaku's Patricia Hernandez claimed that Espeon and Umbreon - Eevee evolutions introduced in Pokémon Gold and Silver - were superior to Vaporeon and its counterparts due to "light and darkness" being "cooler" than elementals.[1]

Jolteon[edit]

Number: 135 Type: Electric Evolves from: Eevee Evolves into: None

Jolteon (サンダース Sandāsu?, Thunders), known as the Lightning Pokémon, is one of the evolutions of Eevee that is caused by radiation from a Thunderstone. Its counterparts are Flareon and Vaporeon, which evolve from Eevee using a Fire Stone and Water Stone respectively. Jolteon is covered with spiky, bright yellow fur, with white spiky fur surrounding its neck. Its fur sparks with electricity constantly; it can be soft to the touch or turn into sharp needles that can be fired when it is angered.[191] Jolteon is able to gather negative ions from the atmosphere, using the resulting electricity to create lightning bolts of up to 10,000 volts.[192] Its individual cells also create small electrical charges on their own, which can result in powerful electric-type attacks.[193] It is very sensitive, which causes it to constantly charge as it quickly changes moods.[194]

Jolteon first appeared in the anime in The Battling Eevee Brothers, under the ownership of Sparky.[190] In Get Along, Little Pokémon, Ethan used a Jolteon as a sheep dog of sorts. Whenever any of Ethan's Magnemite tried to escape, Jolteon would use Thunder Wave to lure them back. Jolteon was also seen under the ownership of one of the Kimono Sisters in Trouble's Brewing and Espeon Not Included. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Red temporarily controls a Jolteon, which is actually his Eevee switching between its evolved forms.

IGN called Jolteon one of the best Electric types, alongside Zapdos, commenting that it is the best Eevee evolution "hands down."[66] Kotaku's Patricia Hernandez claimed that Espeon and Umbreon - Eevee evolutions introduced in Pokémon Gold and Silver - were superior to Jolteon and its counterparts due to "light and darkness" being "cooler" than elementals.[1]

Flareon[edit]

Number: 136 Type: Fire Evolves from: Eevee Evolves into: None

Flareon (ブースター Būsutā?, Booster), known as the Flame Pokémon. Flareon is the result of an Eevee being exposed to a Fire Stone. Its counterparts are Vaporeon and Jolteon, which evolve from Eevee using a Water Stone and Thunder Stone respectively. Flareon's body is covered in red fur. Flareon has a large, bushy tail, fluffy collar and a tuft of fur on its head; all of which are yellow. Flareon has a flame sac in its body,[195] and can also shoot powerful flames that have been known to reach a maximum of 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit.[196] Flareon fluffs out its fur collar to cool down its body temperature, which can reach 1,650 degrees.[197]

Flareon first appeared in the anime in The Battling Eevee Brothers, under the ownership of Pyro.[190] Flareon was seen under the ownership of one of the Kimono Sisters in Trouble's Brewing and Espeon Not Included. A Fire Pokémon trainer named Egan used one to capture a Magcargo in Some Like it Hot. A Pokémon Coordinator, Savannah, that was going to enter the Rustboro City Pokémon Contest has a Flareon, which appeared in A Fan with a Plan. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Red temporarily controls a Flareon, which is actually his Eevee switching between its evolved forms.

Kotaku's Patricia Hernandez claimed that Espeon and Umbreon - Eevee evolutions introduced in Pokémon Gold and Silver - were superior to Flareon and its counterparts due to "light and darkness" being "cooler" than elementals.[1]

Porygon[edit]

Number: 137 Type: Normal Evolves from: None Evolves into: Porygon2

Porygon (ポリゴン Porigon?) is a man-made Pokémon, the product of extensive research by Silph Co. It consists entirely of programming code, allowing it to move freely in cyberspace. This code is copy protected to prevent duplication. This code is fairly restrictive, limiting Porygon to certain pre-programmed motions, actions, and reactions. As it does not need to breathe, it is used in various environments, even some normally considered inhospitable. The name is the same as the Japanese transliteration of the English word "polygon".

In the video games, Porygon is only available as the most expensive prize bought by coins from slot machines. As a result, a large number of people have taken to playing the slots seeking to win a Porygon. These gamblers are especially visible in the towns of Kanto and Johto. Porygon are not available in Hoenn at all. However, Porygon actually run wild in Mr. Backlot's Trophy Garden, found in Sinnoh. The reason for this is that Mr. Backlot, the owner, is so proud of his Trophy Garden that he will often brag about certain Pokémon (like Porygon) living there when they don't. In response to this, his loyal butler actually searches for these Pokémon and releases them into the garden. Porygon is cheaper to obtain in some games than in others.

Porygon makes several cameo appearances in the Super Smash Bros. series of crossover fighting games. Porygon first appears in Super Smash Bros. as one of the five Pokémon that appears from the door on the Saffron City stage, and later appears in one stage of Super Smash Bros. Melee as a moving platform. Porygon's most significant appearance in the Pokémon anime to date is "Dennō Senshi Porygon", an episode notorious for having caused hundreds of children in Japan to have epileptic seizures[198] during its initial broadcast in 1997. Following subsequent public outcry, the anime went on a hiatus and was almost cancelled. Even though Pikachu's Thunderbolt attack caused the 'seizure attack', Porygon and its evolved forms Porygon2 and Porygon-Z have never been featured prominently in any Pokémon episodes or films since. However, Porygon did make brief appearances in the American dubs. He can be seen in the episode "A Chansey Operation", Who's That Pokémon in "A Way Off Day Off" with an English dub voice, and in the Poké-Rap lyrics "Machop, Shellder, Porygon, Hitmonchan."

GamesRadar described Porygon as "outdated as Nintendo 64 graphics" due to its subsequent evolutions.[199] IGN described its evolutions as appearing "much more smoother and lifelike" than its initial design.[200]

Omanyte[edit]

Number: 138 Type: Rock/Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Omastar

Omanyte (オムナイト Omunaito?, Omnite) is a Pokémon that is long extinct. Some can be revived using Helix fossils, and a small number have been shown to be in deep hibernation. It lives in the deep in the primordial sea where it navigates by twisting its ten tentacles, and uses air in its shell to rise and sink. It eats plankton off of the sea floor, and withdraws into its shell to escape harm. Omanyte is based on the ammonite, a creature which resembles it, and sounds similar in name.

Its popularity skyrocketed during the social experiment Twitch Plays Pokémon, where as an untossable key item, players would inadvertently try to use the fossil repeatedly. A religion formed around the game; the Helix was the treated as the god of anarchy, the Dome Fossil (which can be revived into Kabuto) became the god of democracy. The goal of many players became to revive the fossil, and they rejoiced when this occurred.[201][202]

Omastar[edit]

Number: 139 Type: Rock/Water Evolves from: Omanyte Evolves into: None

Omastar (オムスター Omusutā?, Omstar) is the evolution of Omanyte. Omastar went extinct due to its heavy shell making it too sluggish to capture prey despite the fact that its ability is "Swift Swim". When it does capture prey, it uses its tentacles, which developed similarly to hands and feet, to hold its prey, and tear at it with its fangs within the mouth. If met with molluscs, such as Shellder, it cracks the shell and sucks on the toes. Its appearance seems to be based on the ammonite, an extinct cephalopod that resembles a Chambered Nautilus.

Kabuto[edit]

Number: 140 Type: Rock/Water Evolves from: None Evolves into: Kabutops

Kabuto (カブト Kabuto?) is an extinct Pokémon that can be revived through Dome fossils, though some living examples have been found. It seems to be based on a trilobite. Remaining unchanged for 300 million years, it is an aquatic Pokémon that dances on the sea floor, which is how some Kabuto became fossils in the first place. While concealed, Kabuto exposes only its hard shell, which protects it from predators, while the small black eyes on its back allow it to continue monitoring its surroundings. If it is flipped upside down, it becomes helpless and defenseless as it is unable to flip over on its own. According to the anime, oil extracted from a Kabuto is rumored to have interesting medical properties, longevity being one of them.

It gained large amounts of attention in Twitch Plays Pokémon as the foil to Omanyte. As the Helix was the treated as the god of anarchy, the Dome became the god of democracy.[202]

Kabutops[edit]

Number: 141 Type: Rock/Water Evolves from: Kabuto Evolves into: None

Kabutops (カブトプス Kabutopusu?), known as the Shellfish Pokémon, is the evolved form of Kabuto. Kabutops is loosely based on trilobites as a counterpoint to Omanyte and Omastar representing ammonites. This can clearly be seen with the enlarged cephalon and the pygidium and thoracic spines. It was introduced in Pokémon Red and Blue, where the player-character plays a part in reviving the assumed-extinct species by giving a Fossil to the Scientist on Cinnabar Island.

Kabuto's four insect-like legs have vanished and two long feet stand in their place. Two long sharp claws (or sickles) extend from Kabutops's exoskeleton and several plates close the opening that used to be there. There are six hard spikes going down from the back of its neck, three on each side that lead down towards the beginning of its tail. Its head is covered in a rock hard, semicircular shape armor. A tail protrudes from its back, bearing the same color as approximately seventy-five percent of its body. Its gills have also begun to change to make it land compatible. Kabutops lives in the water, and its sleek body enables it to swim faster by tucking in its limbs, folding up its claw-like sickles and wiggling.[203] The creature comes out of the water to hunt. Kabutops is a predator, but its nature of feeding is vampiric; instead of killing its prey, it uses its razor sharp claws to open wounds in its prey, and then drink its blood.[204] Adaptations in its body permit it to lead a more terrestrial lifestyle than its predecessors. It is also very adaptive as shown when its prey started living on land so Kabutops adapted to living on land as well.[205]

Aerodactyl[edit]

Number: 142 Type: Rock/Flying Does not evolve

Aerodactyl (プテラ Putera?, Ptera), known as the Fossil Pokémon, is an ancient Pokémon that roamed the skies during the prehistoric age.[206] It is resurrected from DNA found in fossilized amber.[207] It is imagined to have been the king of the skies in ancient times,[208] with a body structure similar to a pterodactyl and other features, such as the head and tail, having more in common with dragons. It captures its prey with its talons and brings it to its nest. However, if the prey resists, it may use its razor-sharp teeth to immobilize it. When attacking its enemies or opponents, it goes for the throat with its saw like fangs.[209] Aerodactyl is heavy and rough-skinned, leading to the development of strong wings. It is currently also the only Pokémon restored from a fossil to Mega Evolve. Some Pokémon researchers think that its Mega Evolved form is what it looked like before it went extinct.

IGN's Pokémon of the Day Chick named it one of her five favourite Pokémon.[210] Official Nintendo Magazine's Thomas East listed Aerodactyl's name as one of the worst in the Pokémon series due to the combination of pterodactyl and aero being redundant since it is presumed that a pterodactyl can fly.[211] Independent.ie described Aerodactyl as a "macho" Pokémon due to its "bat wings and forked tail".[212] Author Ash Dekirk compared it to the mythical beast wyvern and called it "incredibly rare". He added that its head was "dragonesque".[213]

Snorlax[edit]

Number: 143 Type: Normal Evolves from: Munchlax (Happiness) Evolves into: None
Main article: Snorlax

Snorlax (カビゴン?, Kabigon), known as the Sleeping Pokémon, is said to weigh over 1,000 pounds.[214] Snorlax appears in Super Smash Bros. Melee and Brawl as one of the Pokémon that can be released from a Poké Ball, and uses Body Slam to flatten players that are caught beneath it.

Snorlax has been utilized by the anime series main character Ash Ketchum, and Pokémon Adventures main character Red. Snorlax had a mixed reception, GameSpy calling it "downright silly", while IGN says it is "one of the most powerful Pokémon of all".

Articuno[edit]

Number: 144 Type: Ice/Flying Does not evolve
Main article: Articuno

Articuno (フリーザー Furīzā?, Freezer), known as the Freeze Pokémon, is a legendary Pokémon,[215] one of the legendary birds, along with Zapdos and Moltres. It is a large bird with red eyes, blue plumage, a bluish-white-feathered chest, a three feathered crest adorning its head. With its long, sparkling tail trailing behind, its flying form is magnificent.[216] It can create and manipulate ice freely by freezing the moisture in the air.[217] Its translucent wings are imbued with the essence of frigidity, and the flapping of its wings chills the air,[218] causing the conversion of water particles in the air into snow or ice, causing snow to fall when it flies overhead.[219] In legend, Articuno resides within the confines of icy mountains, because those who have seen its were often doomed explorers scaling such mountains, and therefore it is believed Articuno makes it a point to appear before them and save them.[220]

Zapdos[edit]

Number: 145 Type: Electric/Flying Does not evolve
Main article: Zapdos

Zapdos (サンダー Sandā?, Thunder), known as the Electric Pokémon, is a legendary Pokémon,[221] one of the legendary birds, along with Articuno and Moltres. It may be based on the thunderbird. Zapdos has the form of a large bird with black and yellow plumage, with its spiky feathers make it look as if it were made of lightning. Its tail feathers stick out in several directions, furthering this illusion. A large crest of feathers decorates its head, and distinctive black rings encircle its eyes.

Moltres[edit]

Number: 146 Type: Fire/Flying Does not evolve
Main article: Moltres

Moltres (ファイヤー Faiyā?, Fire), known as the Flame Pokémon, is a legendary Pokémon,[222] one of the legendary birds, along with Articuno and Zapdos. It is a large bird that is literally ablaze with fire, resembling a phoenix. Moltres has flame-colored plumage, and its dazzling wings and elaborate head crest appear to be covered with flames. It has a straight, pointed brown break, which is the same color as its feet. It can freely create and manipulate fire, and when it flaps its wings, it creates a brilliant flash of flames.[223] If its body is injured for any reason, it will head towards a volcano and dip its body in the molten magma to heal its wounds.[224] When Moltres is in possible danger, it will summon a flash of fire and disappear. Moltres appear to live in hot regions, particularly active volcanoes. It appears to migrate to the south during the springtime,[225] making many believe that its appearance will bring about an early spring.[226]

Dratini[edit]

Number: 147 Type: Dragon Evolves from: None Evolves into: Dragonair (Lv.30)

Dratini (Miniryu ミニリュウ?, Miniryū), known as the Dragon Pokémon, is a serpent-like dragon Pokémon with a white circle shape on its forehead. Dratini inhabit lakes and rivers. They possess fins on the sides of their heads, which grow to be enormous as it evolves, as well as a large, round silver nose on their face. They are constantly growing, and can become quite long. As they grow, they shed their delicate deep blue skin. They have a massive amount of energy rapidly increasing inside of their bodies,[227] hence, they have great strength which grows exponentially as they evolve. They live in colonies in the ocean in limited numbers[228] and fetch a high price as Pokémon to be used for battling. They can only be obtained by the most determined and skilled trainers.

The episode in which Dratini first appeared The Legend of Dratini has never been seen on American television, due to use of guns and humor considered "politically incorrect" to American audiences (e.g. Jessie seducing a guard by dressing up as a schoolgirl). Because of the episode's ban, continuity errors were made apparent about the herd of Tauros Ash captured in the episode. Footage from the episode can be seen during the Pokérap when showing Pokémon featured in the episode.

IGN described Dratini as an “adorable baby water dragon”.[229] Destructoid's Jim Sterling wrote that Dragonite's design was disappointing after Dratini and Dragonair's which he called "awesome".[230] Author Ash Dekirk described Dratini as a "sleek sea serpent" and an example of a Pokémon that is based on dragons.[231]

Dragonair[edit]

Number: 148 Type: Dragon Evolves from: Dratini (Lv.30) Evolves into: Dragonite (Lv.55)

Dragonair (Hakuryu ハクリュー?, Hakuryū), known as the Dragon Pokémon, is the evolved form of Dratini. Dragonair are long, serpentine Pokémon that can be up to 13 feet long. They have dark, glossy eyes and a small, unicorn-like horn on their foreheads. On either side of their heads are small feathery wings. Dragonair are covered in sapphire-blue scales, except for their bellies, which are a bright white. A feature unique to Dragonair are the small blue orbs that appear under their necks and on the ends of their tails.[232] Dragonair give out a distinct, gentle aura that can be felt by humans.[233] Many people have also seen these Pokémon flying, even though they have no wings, except for the small wings on their head.[234] Dragonair also host a large amount of energy within their bodies which they discharge from their crystals, allowing them to change the weather.[235] Dragonair's orb can be used as a source of light. Dragonair have the ability to shed their skin, ridding their bodies of unwanted ailments.

In the games, Clair owns multiple Dragonair. Dragonair first appeared in the anime in the banned episode, The Legend of Dratini, as a Dratini the warden of the Safari Zone was protecting, which evolved later in the episode. Clair had a Dratini that evolved into a Dragonair. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Lance owns two Dragonair, one caught previously, the other stolen and brainwashed, and was supposed to be a prize in a Surfing contest.

IGN's Pokémon Chick wrote that while middle forms of Pokémon are typically “ugly”, Dragonair was the exception. She described it as “one of the single most gorgeous Pokémon in existence” and one of her “very favorite Pokémon”.[236] IGN's Jack DeVries called it a “giant girly snake”.[237] Destructoid's Jim Sterling wrote that Dragonite's design was disappointing after Dratini and Dragonair's which he called "awesome".[230] Author Ash Dekirk described Dragonair as a "sleek sea serpent" and an example of a Pokémon that is based on dragons.[231]

Dragonite[edit]

Number: 149 Type: Dragon/Flying Evolves from: Dragonair (Lv.55) Evolves into: None

Dragonite (カイリュー Kairyū?, Kairyu), known as the Dragon Pokémon, is the final form of the Dratini evolutionary line. Dragonite's appearance is notably different from that of its previous forms: as Dragonite, it is now an orange bipedal dragon with a beige underbelly that extends from the top of its neck to the tip of its tail. It gains the secondary Flying-type, growing wings. Dragonite are extremely fast, able to circle around the globe in sixteen hours.[238] It has a small horn on the top of its head, along with slightly "S" shaped antennae. Much like its previous forms, Dragonite still has a gentle and somewhat innocent appearance and a kindhearted disposition. They have been said to save people from drowning and lead ships that have been trapped in storms to safety.[239][240] People have claimed that there is an island somewhere that only Dragonite inhabit.[241] Its diet consists mainly of berries, soft plants, and fruit, while it will occasionally eat crustaceans. Dragonite are said to have an intelligence matching humans.[242]

The first video game appearance of Dragonite was in Pokémon Red and Blue versions, where it would evolve from Dragonair, the evolution of Dratini. It later appeared in several sequels, including Pokémon Gold and Silver, Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, the Red and Blue remakes Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, Pokémon Black and White, Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, and Pokémon X and Y. Outside of the main series, Dragonite has appeared in Pokémon Pinball, Pokémon Snap, the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games, and PokéPark Wii: Pikachu's Adventure. In Pokémon Ranger, after the sixth mission, it is possible to use the Dragonite Bus which will fly the player to any of the Ranger bases. It is used by a few notable characters in the main series, such as Clair, Gym Leader of Johto; Lance, part of the Elite Four of Kanto, and the champion of Johto; and Winona, Gym Leader of Hoenn.

Dragonite's first appearance was in "Mystery at the Lighthouse" as a giant Pokémon. Bill was not aware of what it was, and called it unknown, showing that the Pokédex has yet to be filled, and there are mysteries out there. Dragonite later appeared during Mewtwo Strikes Back. It delivered an invitation to Ash and friends to come to New Island. It was spotted twice in the previous episode "Hello Pummelo" as Ash, Tracy and Misty saw it flying over the sea around Pummelo Island and they were shocked to learn that it was owned by the Orange Crew leader, Drake. It later emerged as Drake's final Pokémon in Ash's six-on-six battle with him. Despite its cute appearance, it showed that it was no pushover by defeating Ash's Charizard, Squirtle, and Tauros although they were able to wear it down, finally giving Ash's Pikachu the chance to take it down for good, courtesy of a Thunder attack. Drake keeps Dragonite's Poké Ball on a necklace and as such, it's his main Pokémon and the strongest one in his party.[243] Dragonite also had a role during the Johto Master Quest series where it was seen residing in the Holy Lands just outside Blackthorn City. It was a peaceful Pokémon but was tricked into thinking that Ash and his friends along with Clair were evil thanks to Team Rocket's efforts. As such, it went on a rampage, destroying everything in its path while also attacking those who came near it. It was snapped out of its rage-induced state thanks to Ash's Charizard and Pikachu as well as Clair's Dragonair, and returned to normal. Iris also caught a Dragonite in the 89th episode of Pokémon Black and White: Rival Destinies, "Iris and the Rogue Dragonite."

In Pokémon Adventures, a wild Dragonite first appears in Volume two, where Red searches for the move Surf. After a tough fight during which it showed great resilience taking Pika's electric attacks to no effect, and withstanding a Double-Edge from Lax, it was eventually beaten when Misty arrived with her Gyarados, Gyara. In Volume four, which takes place two years later, Lance, leader of the Elite Four, is shown to have an even stronger Dragonite, one whose hide is so thick that it was able to stay in a vat of molten lava for an extended period of time, and none of Yellow's weak attacks had any effect. It was very devoted to Lance's cause of exterminating the human race in order to provide good habitats for Pokémon.

Since first appearing in Pokémon Red and Blue, Dragonite has received mostly positive reception. It has been featured in multiple forms of merchandise, including figurines, plushes, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. A promotional Dragonite TCG card was handed out at theatrical showings of Pokémon: The First Movie. Grey School of Wizardry faculty member Ash DeKirk describes Dratini and Dragonair as "sleek sea serpents", but when evolved into Dragonite, they become "peaceful, sleepy-looking classic dragons".[244] Similarly, Loredana Lipperini, author of the book Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi, commented that Dragonite resembled "dragons of legend."[245] Official Nintendo Magazine named Dragonite one of the ten best Pokémon in the game as of 2010, calling it "one of the strongest non-legendary Pokémon".[246] IGN's Jack DeVries called it "very cute", comparing it to Puff the Magic Dragon.[247] GamesRadar described it as a "cuter take on Charizard."[248] According to a poll by IGN, Dragonite was listed at number five of the "Top 100 Pokémon".[249]

Mewtwo[edit]

Number: 150 Type: Psychic Does not evolve
Main article: Mewtwo

Mewtwo (ミュウツー Myūtsū?) is a large bipedal feline-esque Pokémon, with a lavender-colored body, pronounced purple tail and stomach, feline head, and a cable connecting the center of its back to its head behind its neck. Its appearance has been likened to "an oversized cross of cat, squirrel and kangaroo".[250] In the original games, Mewtwo is intended to be "the strongest Pokémon ever".[251] It is psychic, uses telekinesis for flight[252] and telepathy to speak.[253] When fighting, it uses its abilities to shield itself or throw opponents to compensate for its lack of speed.[254] Otherwise, it conserves its energy until needed. It can regenerate as well, and is able to quickly recover from near-fatal injuries.[255] A Mewtwo is said to be Mew's clone made by scientists.

Awakened Mewtwo (覚醒したミュウツー Kakusei-shita Myūtsū?) is a new alternate form of Mewtwo, having achieved some form of enlightenment. Awakened Mewtwo appears in the anime special Mewtwo: Prologue to Awakening[256] and the film Genesect and the Legend Awakened.[257] On the video games' websites, this Pokémon is treated as new and shrouded in mystery, with only its resemblance to Mewtwo mentioned.[258][259] However, it has been identified as "Awakened Mewtwo" in its appearances in the anime in Japan, and is alternately referred to as "Mewtwo's Awakened Forme".[260]

Mew[edit]

Number: 151 Type: Psychic Does not evolve
Main article: Mew (Pokémon)

Like Mewtwo, Mew (ミュウ Myū?) is a Psychic-type Pokémon with high stats.[261] Morimoto designed it as a pink, feline-esque Pokémon with large eyes and a long, thin tail that broadens at the end.[262] Its skin is covered with a layer of short, fine hair.[263] Its DNA combines the genetic composition of all existing Pokémon species;[264] the game states that scientists within the game view it as being the single ancestor of all other Pokémon.[265] It is shy and rarely seen by humans.[262][264] It is a legendary Pokémon[266][267] from the first generation, along with Articuno,[268] Zapdos,[221] Moltres,[222] and Mewtwo.[269] In Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, the player can find journal entries in the Pokémon Mansion on Cinnabar Island stating that Mew was discovered deep in the jungles of Guyana, South America, on July 5 (the year is not specified),[270] and named on July 10,[271] and that it "gave birth" to Mewtwo on February 6.[272] The name mew is based on the onomatopoeia of a cat's cry, meow.[261]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Hernandez, Patricia (2012-12-17). "Pokémon Designs Aren't Getting Worse, They May Be Getting Better". Kotaku. Retrieved 2014-03-16. 
  2. ^ Staff (2000-02-09). "ABC News Pokémon Chat Transcript". IGN. Retrieved 2009-06-09. 
  3. ^ a b Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Wears the skull of its deceased mother. Its cries echo inside the skull and come out as a sad melody." 
  4. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Because it never removes its skull helmet, no one has ever seen this Pokémon's real face." 
  5. ^ a b Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Cubone pines for the mother it will never see again. Seeing a likeness of its mother in the full moon, it cries. The stains on the skull the Pokémon wears are made by the tears it sheds." 
  6. ^ a b c d Chua-Euan, Howard (November 22, 1999). "PokéMania". TIME. Retrieved 2008-09-15. 
  7. ^ "Pokemon Stadium Strategy Guide - IGNguides". Guides.ign.com. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  8. ^ October 22, 2008 (2008-10-22). "Pokemon 151: Karakara Shirt". UGO.com. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  9. ^ "Cubone - #98 Top Pokémon". IGN. Retrieved 2014-05-18. 
  10. ^ Harmon, O'Dell (2012-11-21). "Top 50 Pokémon Of All Time". Game Informer. Retrieved 2014-05-18. 
  11. ^ Padilla, Raymond (2007-10-25). "Pokemusings, week 20, page 3". GamesRadar. Future Publishing. Retrieved 2010-03-09. 
  12. ^ Sullivan, Lucas; Elston, Brett. "The most disturbing Pokemon of all time". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2014-05-18. 
  13. ^ "The most disturbing Pokemon of all time". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  14. ^ The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 10 | GamesRadar
  15. ^ Pokemon Monday 29 - Ditto is a failed Mew ... | GamesRadar
  16. ^ "Pokemon Ruby Version Pokemon of the Day: Cubone (#104) - IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  17. ^ Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  18. ^ Pokemon Stadium Strategy Guide - IGNguides
  19. ^ Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Marowak (#105) - IGN FAQs
  20. ^ Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2000. ISBN 9788882102494. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  21. ^ a b Pokemon Monday 29 - Ditto is a failed Mew | GamesRadar
  22. ^ a b c d Pikachu's global adventure: the rise ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2004-02-05. ISBN 0822332876. Retrieved 2011-02-21. 
  23. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "When in a hurry, its legs lengthen progressively. It runs smoothly with extra long, loping strides." 
  24. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "When kicking, the sole of its foot turns as hard as a diamond on impact and destroys its enemy." 
  25. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "This amazing Pokémon has an awesome sense of balance. It can kick in succession from any position." 
  26. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "If it starts kicking repeatedly, both legs will stretch to strike a fleeing foe." 
  27. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Hitmonlee's legs freely contract and stretch. Using these springlike legs, it bowls over foes with devastating kicks. After battle, it rubs down its legs and loosens the muscles to overcome fatigue." 
  28. ^ a b Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  29. ^ HAL Laboratory (April 26, 1999). Super Smash Bros. Nintendo 64. Nintendo. 
  30. ^ Chunsoft (April 20, 2008). Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  31. ^ a b Hideki Sonoda (writer) (October 15, 1998). "The Punchy Pokémon". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 29. Various.
  32. ^ Takeshi Shudō (writer) (November 12, 1999). "Pokémon: The First Movie". Pokémon. Various.
  33. ^ Hideki Sonoda (writer) (December 4, 2001). "Pokémon: Mewtwo Returns". Pokémon. Various.
  34. ^ Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer) (June 3, 2006). "The Legend of Thunder!". Pokémon. Season Pokémon Chronicles. Various.
  35. ^ a b Masashi Sogo (writer) (July 8, 2006). "Pasta La Vista!". Pokémon. Season Advanced Battle. Episode 145. Various.
  36. ^ Shōji Yonemura (writer) (December 4, 2010). "Casting a Paul on Barry!". Pokémon. Season Diamond & Pearl: Sinnoh League Victors. Episode 184. Various.
  37. ^ Pokemon of the Day Chick (2003-03-26). "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Hitmonlee (#106) - IGN FAQs". IGN. Retrieved 2011-02-21. 
  38. ^ Hinkle, David (2008-08-19). "DS Daily: Favorite Pokemon?". Joystiq. Retrieved 2011-02-21. 
  39. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "While apparently doing nothing, it fires punches in lightning fast volleys that are impossible to see." 
  40. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Punches in corkscrew fashion. It can punch its way through a concrete wall in the same way as a drill." 
  41. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its punches slice through the air. However, it seems to need a short break after fighting for three minutes." 
  42. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "To increase the strength of all its punch moves, it spins its arms just before making contact." 
  43. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its punches slice the air. They are launched at such high speed, even a slight graze could cause a burn." 
  44. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "A Hitmonchan is said to possess the spirit of a boxer who had been working towards a world championship. This Pokémon has an indomitable spirit and will never give up in the face of adversity." 
  45. ^ Hideki Sonoda (writer) (February 12, 2000). "Stage Fight!". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 90. Various.
  46. ^ Junki Takegami (writer) (January 20, 2001). "Chikorita's Big Upset". Pokémon. Season The Johto Journeys. Episode 136. Various.
  47. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its tongue has well-developed nerves that run to the very tip, so it can be deftly manipulated." 
  48. ^ Game Freak (2009-03-22). Pokémon Platinum. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "When it extends its over-six-foot-long tongue, its tail quivers. There is a possibility they are connected." 
  49. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Its tongue spans almost 7 feet and moves more freely than its forelegs. Its licks can cause paralysis." 
  50. ^ a b Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It has a tongue that is over 6'6" long. It uses this long tongue to lick its body clean." 
  51. ^ Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "Instead of hands, it uses its tongue, which is twice its height. Its sticky saliva grips anything." 
  52. ^ Game Freak (2005-05-01). Pokémon Emerald. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Whenever it sees something unfamiliar, it always licks the object because it memorizes things by texture and taste. It is somewhat put off by sour things." 
  53. ^ "Fugly Pokemon". GamesRadar. Future Publishing. Retrieved 2010-03-14. 
  54. ^ "Pokemon Strategy Guide - IGNguides". Guides.ign.com. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  55. ^ John Funk (2010-09-16). "The Escapist : News : All New Pokemon from Pokemon Black & White Revealed". Escapistmagazine.com. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  56. ^ Luke Albiges (2007-05-14). "Pokémon Diamond/Pearl DS Review - Page 1". Eurogamer.net. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  57. ^ Generazione Pókemon: i bambini e l ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2000. ISBN 9788882102494. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  58. ^ The art of the start: the time ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2004. ISBN 9781591840565. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  59. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "If one of the twin Koffing inflates, the other one deflates. It constantly mixes its poisonous gases." 
  60. ^ Zablotny, Marc (October 8, 2012). "15 amazing Pokemon facts and secrets - 10. Rhydon is the first Pokemon". Official Nintendo Magazine. Retrieved May 6, 2013. 
  61. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "By lightly spinning its drill-like horn, it can easily shatter even a diamond in the rough." 
  62. ^ a b Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Rhydon's horn can crush even uncut diamonds. One sweeping blow of its tail can topple a building. This Pokémon's hide is extremely tough. Even direct cannon hits don't leave a scratch." 
  63. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Protected by an armor-like hide, it is capable of living in molten lava of 3,600 degrees." 
  64. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its rugged hide protects it from even the heat of lava. However, the hide also makes it insensitive." 
  65. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its brain developed when it began walking on hind legs. Its thick hide protects it even in magma." 
  66. ^ a b c d Pokémon Stadium 2: Basics
  67. ^ Pokemon Ruby Version Pokemon of the Day: Rhydon (#112) - IGN FAQs
  68. ^ The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 11 | GamesRadar
  69. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "A rare and elusive Pokémon that is said to bring happiness to those who manage to get it." 
  70. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "It lays several eggs a day. The eggs are apparently rich in nutrients and extremely delicious." 
  71. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "A gentle and kind-hearted Pokémon that shares its nutritious eggs if it sees an injured Pokémon." 
  72. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It walks carefully to prevent its egg from breaking. However, it is extremely fast at running away." 
  73. ^ Skertic, Annie (2000-06-04). "It's gearing up to be a Poke-full summer". Chicago Sun-Times. 
  74. ^ "Beware the Pokemon plague". Irish Independent. 1999-12-03. 
  75. ^ Pokemon Blue Guide & Walkthrough - Game Boy - IGN
  76. ^ Buffa, Chris. "Top 10 Weirdest Looking Pokémon". GameDaily. AOL. Archived from the original on 2011-05-09. Retrieved 2009-06-09. 
  77. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "It maintains balance using its tail, which is wound up like a coil. It may spray ink from its mouth." 
  78. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "If it senses any danger, it will vigorously spray water or a special type of ink from its mouth." 
  79. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "If attacked by a larger enemy, it quickly swims to safety by adeptly controlling its dorsal fin." 
  80. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Known to shoot down flying bugs with precision blasts of ink from the surface of the water." 
  81. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its big, developed fins move rapidly, allowing it to swim backward while still facing forward." 
  82. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "When they're in a safe location, they can be seen playfully tangling their tails together." 
  83. ^ a b Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Horsea eats small insects and moss off of rocks. If the ocean current turns fast, this Pokémon anchors itself by wrapping its tail around rocks or coral to prevent being washed away." 
  84. ^ Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "It makes its nest in the shade of corals. If it senses danger, it spits murky ink and flees." 
  85. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its fin tips leak poison. Its fins and bones are highly valued as ingredients in herbal medicine." 
  86. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Capable of swimming backwards by rapidly flapping its wing-like pectoral fins and stout tail." 
  87. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Touching the back fin causes numbness. It hooks its tail to coral to stay in place while sleeping." 
  88. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Sapphire. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Seadra generates whirlpools by spinning its body. The whirlpools are strong enough to swallow even fishing boats. This Pokémon weakens prey with these currents, then swallows it whole." 
  89. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "The male raises the young. If it is approached, it uses its toxic spikes to fend off the intruder." 
  90. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Its tail fin billows like an elegant ballroom dress, giving it the nickname of the Water Queen." 
  91. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "A strong swimmer, it is capable of swimming nonstop up fast streams at a steady speed of five knots." 
  92. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Sapphire. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Goldeen loves swimming wild and free in rivers and ponds. If one of these Pokémon is placed in an aquarium, it will shatter even the thickest glass with one ram of its horn and make its escape." 
  93. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "During spawning season, they swim gracefully in the water, searching for their perfect mate." 
  94. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "When it is time for them to lay eggs, they can be seen swimming up rivers and falls in large groups." 
  95. ^ Masahiro Sakurai (05/06/2007). "Smash Bros. DOJO!!". 
  96. ^ "The Most Useless Video Game Items from". 1UP.com. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  97. ^ October 14, 2010 (2010-10-14). "The Pokeball – Super Smash Bros. Melee". UGO.com. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  98. ^ a b c "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Goldeen (#118) - IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  99. ^ "The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 11". GamesRadar. 2007-08-24. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  100. ^ Generazione Pokémon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi ... - Loredana Lipperini - Google Boeken. Books.google.com. 2000. ISBN 9788882102494. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  101. ^ "Thirty rubbish Pokemon: Red/Blue edition". Destructoid. Retrieved 2012-12-30. 
  102. ^ Game Freak (2005-05-01). Pokémon Emerald. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "The horn on its head is sharp like a drill. It bores a hole in a boulder to make its nest." 
  103. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "In the autumn spawning season, they can be seen swimming powerfully up rivers and creeks." 
  104. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "During spawning season, Seaking gather from all over, coloring the rivers a brilliant red." 
  105. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "In the autumn, Seaking males can be seen performing courtship dances in riverbeds to woo females. During this season, this Pokémon's body coloration is at its most beautiful." 
  106. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "It is the male's job to make a nest by carving out boulders in a stream using the horn on its head." 
  107. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Sapphire. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Seaking is very protective of its eggs. The male and female will take turns patrolling around their nest and eggs. The guarding of eggs by these Pokémon goes on for over a month." 
  108. ^ a b c New Pokémon Look Great; Mustaches, Afros, Warts, and All | Bitmob.com
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  111. ^ Thirty rubbish Pokemon: Red/Blue edition -Destructoid
  112. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Its central core glows with the seven colors of the rainbow. Some people value the core as a gem." 
  113. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It is said that it uses the seven colored core of its body to send electric waves into outer space." 
  114. ^ Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Starmie (#121) - IGN FAQs
  115. ^ Thirty rubbish Pokemon: Red/Blue edition -Destructoid
  116. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "A skilled mime from birth, it gains the ability to create invisible objects as it matures." 
  117. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its fingertips emit a peculiar force field that hardens air to create an actual wall." 
  118. ^ Game Freak (2009-03-22). Pokémon Platinum. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "It shapes an invisible wall in midair by minutely vibrating its fingertips to stop molecules in the air." 
  119. ^ Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Pearl. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "Emanations from its fingertips solidify the air into invisible walls that repel even harsh attacks." 
  120. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Mr. Mime is a master of pantomime. Its gestures and motions convince watchers that something unseeable actually exists. Once it is believed, it will exist as if it were a real thing." 
  121. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "If interrupted while it is miming, it will slap around the offender with its broad hands." 
  122. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "With ninja-like agility and speed, it can create the illusion that there is more than one." 
  123. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Leaps out of tall grass and slices prey with its scythes. The movement looks like that of a ninja." 
  124. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "When it moves, it leaves only a blur. If it hides in grass, its protective colors make it invisible." 
  125. ^ Game Freak (2009-03-22). Pokémon Platinum. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "The sharp scythes on its forearms become increasingly sharp by cutting through hard objects." 
  126. ^ Staff. "2. 一新されたポケモンの世界". Nintendo.com (in Japanese). Nintendo. p. 2. Retrieved 2010-09-10. 
  127. ^ Stuart Bishop (2003-05-30). "Game Freak on Pokémon!". CVG. Archived from the original on 2008-02-08. Retrieved 2008-02-07. 
  128. ^ "ポケモンカード 【ストライク】 PMBKZ-001 《バトル強化デッキ ゼクロムEX収録》". Amazon. Retrieved September 15, 2012. 
  129. ^ "ポケットモンスター M-068 モンコレ ストライク". Amazon. Retrieved September 15, 2012. 
  130. ^ Staff (2003-08-29). "Pokemon of the Day: #123 Scyther". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved 2009-10-16. 
  131. ^ Staff (2002-10-25). "Pokemon of the Day: #212 Scizor". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved 2009-10-16. 
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  133. ^ "Pokemon - Page 1". GameSpy. Retrieved 2013-09-01. 
  134. ^ "A Decade of Pokemon Scandals - Jynx Incites Racial Backlash". Yahoo. Retrieved 2009-06-09. 
  135. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Electricity runs across the surface of its body. In darkness, its entire body glows a whitish-blue." 
  136. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "When a storm arrives, gangs of this Pokémon compete with each other to scale heights that are likely to be stricken by lightning bolts. Some towns use Electabuzz in place of lightning rods." 
  137. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "When two Electabuzz touch, they control the electric currents to communicate their feelings." 
  138. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "It loves to feed on strong electricity. It occasionally appears around large power plants and so on." 
  139. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Normally found near power plants, they can wander away and cause major blackouts in cities." 
  140. ^ a b Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Born in an active volcano. Its body is always cloaked in flames, so it looks like a big ball of fire." 
  141. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It dislikes cold places, so it blows scorching flames to make the environment suitable for itself." 
  142. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Its body always burns with an orange glow that enables it to hide perfectly among flames." 
  143. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It moves more frequently in hot areas. It can heal itself by dipping its wound into lava." 
  144. ^ "Fugly Pokemon". GamesRadar. Future Publishing. Retrieved 2010-03-14. 
  145. ^ The most overused Pokemon designs | GamesRadar
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  150. ^ Game Freak (2005-05-01). Pokémon Emerald. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Their pincers are strong enough to shatter thick logs. Because they dislike cold, Pinsir burrow and sleep under the ground on chilly nights." 
  151. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "When the temperature drops at night, it sleeps on treetops or among roots where it is well hidden." 
  152. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "With its horns, it digs burrows to sleep in at night. In the morning, damp soil clings to its body." 
  153. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "If it fails to crush the victim in its pincers, it will swing it around and toss it hard." 
  154. ^ IGN Staff (December 20, 2000). "IGN: The Games of Pokemon GS: Part 1". IGN. Retrieved 2009-09-29. 
  155. ^ Brett Elston (Apr 22, 2010). "The most disturbing Pokemon of all time". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2011-01-20. 
  156. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Sapphire. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Magikarp is virtually useless in battle as it can only splash around. As a result, it is considered to be weak. However, it is actually a very hardy Pokémon that can survive in any body of water no matter how polluted it is." 
  157. ^ Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "It is said to be the world's weakest Pokémon. No one knows why it has managed to survive." 
  158. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "For no reason, it jumps and splashes about, making it easy for predators like Pidgeotto to catch it mid-jump." 
  159. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "In the distant past, it was somewhat stronger than the horribly weak descendants that exist today." 
  160. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Magikarp is a pathetic excuse for a Pokémon that is only capable of flopping and splashing. This behavior prompted scientists to undertake research into it." 
  161. ^ Game Freak (2009-03-22). Pokémon Platinum. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "A Magikarp living for many years can leap a mountain using Splash. The move remains useless, though." 
  162. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Famous for being very unreliable. It can be found swimming in seas, lakes, rivers and shallow puddles." 
  163. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "This weak and pathetic Pokémon gets easily pushed along rivers when there are strong currents. It is very hard to evolve." 
  164. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Silver. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Once it appears, it goes on a rampage. It remains enraged until it demolishes everything around it." 
  165. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Sapphire. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Once Gyarados goes on a rampage, its ferociously violent blood doesn't calm until it has burned everything down. There are records of this Pokémon's rampages lasting a whole month." 
  166. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "When Magikarp evolves into Gyarados, its brain cells undergo a structural transformation. It is said that this transformation is to blame for this Pokémon's wildly violent nature." 
  167. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It appears whenever there is world conflict, burning down any place it travels through." 
  168. ^ Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "This gentle Pokémon loves to give people rides and provides a very comfortable way to get around." 
  169. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "A gentle soul that can read the minds of people. It can ferry people across the sea on its back." 
  170. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Its high intelligence enables it to understand human speech. It likes to ferry people on its back." 
  171. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "People have driven Lapras almost to the point of extinction. In the evenings, this Pokémon is said to sing plaintively as it seeks what few others of its kind still remain." 
  172. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "They have gentle hearts. Because they rarely fight, many have been caught. Their number has dwindled." 
  173. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "A Pokémon that has been overhunted almost to extinction. It can ferry people across the water." 
  174. ^ "Animerica Interview Toshihiro Ono". VIZ Media. Archived from the original on 2000-05-10. Retrieved 2009-08-05. 
  175. ^ Holm, Erik (1999). Pokémon, Minus Manji Symbol / Swastika-like sign pulled after U.S. uproar. Newsday. 
  176. ^ Padilla, Raymond (2009-03-17). "Junichi Masuda & Takeshi Kawachimaru Talk 'Pokémon Platinum', Particle Physics, Bridges, And More!". G4. Retrieved 2009-06-06. 
  177. ^ "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Ditto (#132) - IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved 2011-09-19. 
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  182. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Its genetic code is unstable, so it could evolve in a variety of ways. There are only a few alive." 
  183. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It has the ability to alter the composition of its body to suit its surrounding environment." 
  184. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Its ability to evolve into many forms allows it to adapt smoothly and perfectly to any environment." 
  185. ^ "Eevee - Pokemon #133: Information about the Eevee Pokemon". About.com. Retrieved 15 October 2010. 
  186. ^ a b Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Its cell structure is similar to water molecules. It will melt away and become invisible in water." 
  187. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Vaporeon underwent a spontaneous mutation and grew fins and gills that allow it to live underwater. This Pokémon has the ability to freely control water." 
  188. ^ a b Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "Lives close to water. Its long tail is ridged with a fin which is often mistaken for a mermaid's." 
  189. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "When Vaporeon's fins begin to vibrate, it is a sign that rain will come within a few hours." 
  190. ^ a b c Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer) (October 27, 1998). "The Battling Eevee Brothers". Pokémon. Season Indigo League. Episode 40. Various.
  191. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "If it is angered or startled, the fur all over its body bristles like sharp needles that pierce foes." 
  192. ^ Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. "It accumulates negative ions in the atmosphere to blast out 10000-volt lightning bolts." 
  193. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "It concentrates the weak electric charges emitted by its cells and launches wicked lightning bolts." 
  194. ^ Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "A sensitive Pokémon that easily becomes sad or angry. Every time its mood changes, it charges power." 
  195. ^ Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "It has a flame sac in its body. Its body temperature tops 1,650 degrees Fahrenheit before battle." 
  196. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "It has a flame bag inside its body. After inhaling deeply, it blows out flames of nearly 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit." 
  197. ^ Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Flareon's fluffy fur has a functional purpose - it releases heat into the air so that its body does not get excessively hot. This Pokémon's body temperature can rise to a maximum of 1,650 degrees F." 
  198. ^ "Juicy Studio: Photsensitove Epilepsy". Juicy Studio. Retrieved 2006-02-05. 
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  200. ^ "Porygon-Z Biography". IGN. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 
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  202. ^ a b Sam Prell (February 22, 2014). "Twitch Plays Pokemon: Its history, highlights and Bird Jesus". Joystiq. Retrieved 2014-05-23. 
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  204. ^ Pokédex: Its sleek shape is perfect for swimming. It slashes prey with its claws and drains the body fluids. Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red and Blue. Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  205. ^ Pokédex: It is thought that this Pokémon came onto land because its prey adapted to life on land. Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  206. ^ Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. "A Pokémon that roamed the skies in the dinosaur era. Its teeth are like saw blades." 
  207. ^ 'Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. "A savage Pokémon that died out in ancient times. It was resurrected using DNA taken from amber." 
  208. ^ Game Freak (2005-05-01). Pokémon Emerald. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "Aerodactyl is a Pokémon from the age of dinosaurs. It was regenerated from DNA extracted from amber. It is imagined to have been the king of the skies." 
  209. ^ Game Freak (2004-09-07). Pokémon LeafGreen. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. "A ferocious, prehistoric Pokémon that goes for the enemy's throat with its serrated, sawlike fangs." 
  210. ^ "Pokemon Crystal Version Pokemon of the Day: Skarmory (#227) – IGN FAQs". Faqs.ign.com. Retrieved October 17, 2011. 
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  213. ^ Dragonlore: From the Archives of the ... – Ash Dekirk – Google Books. Google Books. Retrieved October 17, 2011. 
  214. ^ Trophy: Snorlax love to sleep and love to eat: these portly Pokémon get grumpy if they don't get 888 pounds of food per day. After snacking out, they always nap. They have cast-iron stomachs and can eat moldy and even rotten food with no digestion problems. They are the heaviest Pokémon on record, weighing in at over 1,000 pounds. HAL Laboratory (2001-12-02). Super Smash Bros. Melee. Gamecube. Nintendo. 
  215. ^ HAL Laboratory. Super Smash Bros. Melee. "Articuno trophy: Clouds gather, the barometer plunges, and fresh snow falls from the frigid air when this legendary Pokémon takes wing." 
  216. ^ Pokédex: One of the legendary bird Pokémon. With its long tail trailing behind, its flying form is magnificent. Game Freak (2004-09-09). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  217. ^ Pokédex: A legendary bird Pokémon. It can create blizzards by freezing moisture in the air. Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  218. ^ Pokédex: Articuno is a legendary fire Pokémon that can control ice. The flapping of its wings chills the air. As a result, it is said that when this Pokémon flies, snow will fall. Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  219. ^ Pokédex: Legendary bird Pokémon. As it flies through the sky, it cools the air, causing snow to fall. Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  220. ^ Pokédex: A legendary bird Pokémon that is said to appear to doomed people who are lost in icy mountains. Game Freak (2004-09-09). Pokémon LeafGreen. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  221. ^ a b HAL Laboratory. Super Smash Bros. Melee. "Zapdos trophy: It's said that you can hear this legendary Pokémon coming, as its wings make a very distinctive popping sound as it flies." 
  222. ^ a b HAL Laboratory. Super Smash Bros. Melee. "Moltres trophy: As tradition has it, the onset of spring heralds the return of this legendary Pokémon from its southern home." 
  223. ^ Pokédex: It is said to be the legendary bird Pokémon of fire. Every flap of its wings creates a dazzling flare of flames. Game Freak (2004-09-09). Pokémon LeafGreen. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  224. ^ Pokédex: Moltres is a legendary bird Pokémon that can control fire. If injured, it is said to dip its body in the molten magma of a volcano to heal itself. Game Freak (2005-05-01). Pokémon Emerald. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  225. ^ Pokédex: Legendary bird Pokémon. It is said to migrate from the south along with the spring. Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  226. ^ Pokédex: One of the legendary bird Pokémon. It is said that spring will soon arrive if Moltres shows itself. Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  227. ^ Pokédex: Dratini continually molts and sloughs off its old skin. It does so because the life energy within its body steadily builds to reach uncontrollable levels. Game Freak (2003-03-17). Pokémon Ruby. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  228. ^ Pokédex: Long considered a mythical Pokémon until recently, when a small colony was found living underwater. Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red. Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  229. ^ Pokemon of the Day - GBA News at IGN
  230. ^ a b Thirty rubbish Pokemon: Red/Blue edition -Destructoid
  231. ^ a b Dragonlore: From the Archives of the Grey School of Wizardry - Ash Dekirk - Google Boeken
  232. ^ Pokédex: A Dragonair stores an enormous amount of energy inside its body. It is said to alter the weather around it by losing energy from the crystals on its neck and tail. Game Freak (2005-05-01). Pokémon Emerald. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  233. ^ Pokédex: According to a witness, its body was surrounded by a strange aura that gave it a mystical look. Game Freak (1999-10-19). Pokémon Yellow. Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  234. ^ Pokédex: It is said to live in seas and lakes. Even though it has no wings, it has been seen flying occasionally. Game Freak (2004-09-09). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  235. ^ Pokédex: If its body takes on an aura, the weather changes instantly. It is said to live in seas and lakes. Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  236. ^ Pokemon Crystal Version Pok�mon of the Day: Dragonair (#148) - IGN FAQs
  237. ^ Pokemon Report: Stranger than FanFiction - DS Feature at IGN
  238. ^ Pokédex: It can fly in spite of its big and bulky physique. It circles the globe in just 16.432 hours. Game Freak (2004-09-09). Pokémon FireRed. Game Boy Advance. Nintendo. 
  239. ^ Pokédex: It is said that this Pokémon constantly flies over the immense seas and rescues drowning people. Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  240. ^ Pokédex: It is said to make its home somewhere in the sea. It guides crews of shipwrecks to shore. Game Freak (2007-04-22). Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Nintendo DS. Nintendo. 
  241. ^ Pokédex:It is said that somewhere in the ocean lies an island where these gather. Only they live there. Game Freak (2001-07-29). Pokémon Crystal. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. 
  242. ^ Pokédex: An extremely rarely seen marine Pokémon. Its intelligence is said to match that of humans. Game Freak (1998-09-30). Pokémon Red. Game Boy. Nintendo. 
  243. ^ Atsuhiro Tomioka (writer) (September 23, 2000). "Enter The Dragonite". Pokémon. Season Adventures on the Orange Islands. Episode 112. Various.
  244. ^ DeKirk, Ash; Zell-Ravenheart, Oberon (2006). Dragonlore: From the Archives of the Grey School of Wizardry. Career Press. p. 126. ISBN 1564148688. 
  245. ^ Generazione Pokémon: i bambini e l'invasione planetaria dei nuovi ... - Loredana Lipperini - Google Boeken
  246. ^ Chris Scullion (24 Apr 2010). "Nintendo Feature: 10 Best Pokémon - Official Nintendo Magazine". Official Nintendo Magazine. Retrieved 2010-09-23. 
  247. ^ Day 1: Kristine Doesn't Know Her Elements Video - IGN
  248. ^ The complete Pokemon RBY pokedex, part 14 | GamesRadar
  249. ^ "Dragonite – #5 Top Pokémon". IGN. Retrieved March 17, 2012. 
  250. ^ Stack, Peter (1999-11-10). "'Pokémon' Get Stronger, Longer". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2008-06-11. 
  251. ^ Game Freak (2000-10-15). Pokémon Gold. Game Boy Color. Nintendo. "Because its battle abilities were raised to the ultimate level, it thinks only of defeating its foes." 
  252. ^ Nintendo (2001-12-03). Super Smash Bros. Melee. Nintendo. Level/area: Mewtwo Trophy #2 description. "As Mewtwo relies mostly on its powerful brain, there are times when it scarcely uses its arms and legs." 
  253. ^ ポケットモンスター「ミュウツーの逆襲 完全版」 (VHS) (Motion picture) (in Japanese). Japan: メディアファクトリー. December 1999. ASIN B00005HBUW.  Mewtwo: "私は自分自身のルールを決めている。" / Misty: "その声!" / Brock: "テレパシー!"
  254. ^ Nintendo (2001-12-03). Super Smash Bros. Melee. Nintendo. Level/area: Mewtwo Trophy #3 description. "Mewtwo is definitely not a speedy character, but its ESP-powered grab and throw moves are comparatively strong." 
  255. ^ Computer: "Mewtwo's life responses have diminished." / Doctor Fuji: "What have you done?!" / Researcher: "Please wait! Mewtwo is..." / Doctor Fuji: "What?" / Computer: "Mewtwo's life responses are back. Mewtwo is regenerating itself now." Nintendo (1999-09-13). Sound Picture Box: Mewtwo's Origin: Myutsuu No Tanjou: Pocket-Monster Radio Drama (in Japanese). Catalog# ZMCP-596.
  256. ^ "ポケットモンスター 『ミュウツー ~覚醒への序章~』:あにてれ:テレビ東京". Tv-tokyo.co.jp. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  257. ^ "覚醒したミュウツーが鍵。東京都・よみうりランドでポケモン謎解きイベント | 旅行 | マイナビニュース". News.mynavi.jp. Retrieved 2013-07-16. 
  258. ^ "?????|『ポケットモンスター X』『ポケットモンスター Y』公式サイト". Pokemon.co.jp. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  259. ^ "More Pokémon". Pokemonxy.com. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  260. ^ @ (2013-06-15). "『ポケモン』完全新作アニメ『ミュウツー~覚醒への序章(プロローグ)~』がテレビ東京系列にて放送決定! - ファミ通.com". Famitsu.com. Retrieved 2013-07-16. 
  261. ^ a b "#151 Mew". IGN. Retrieved June 16, 2009. 
  262. ^ a b "Mew Biography". IGN. Retrieved June 29, 2009. 
  263. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. "Pokédex: When viewed through a microscope, this POKéMON's short, fine, delicate hair can be seen." 
  264. ^ a b Game Freak. Pokémon Emerald. "Pokédex: A MEW is said to possess the genes of all POKéMON. It is capable of making itself invisible at will, so it entirely avoids notice even if it approaches people." 
  265. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Pearl. "Pokédex: Because it can use all kinds of moves, many scientists believe MEW to be the ancestor of Pokémon." 
  266. ^ Klein, Andy (December 2, 1999). "Hokeymon". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved June 8, 2009. 
  267. ^ HAL Laboratory. Super Smash Bros. Melee. "Mewtwo trophy: Although Mewtwo was bio-engineerd [sic] from a fossil of the legendary Pokémon Mew, its size and character are far different than its ancestor." 
  268. ^ HAL Laboratory. Super Smash Bros. Melee. "Articuno trophy: Clouds gather, the barometer plunges, and fresh snow falls from the frigid air when this legendary Pokémon takes wing." 
  269. ^ Sora Ltd.. Super Smash Bros. Brawl. "Mewtwo trophy: This legendary Pokémon was based on a recombination of Mew's DNA, created by a scientist after years of research." 
  270. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon FireRed. "Diary: July 5. Guyana, South America. A new POKéMON was discovered deep in the jungle." 
  271. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon FireRed. "Diary: July 10. We christened the newly discovered POKéMON, MEW." 
  272. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon FireRed. "Diary: Feb. 6. MEW gave birth. We named the newborn MEWTWO."