Marquette University Law School

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Marquette University
Law School
Marquette University Law School logo.gif
Established 1892
School type Private
Catholic, Jesuit
Dean Joseph D. Kearney
Location Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Enrollment 630[1]
Faculty 94[1]
Website law.marquette.edu
ABA profile Marquette Law School Profile

Marquette University Law School (Marquette Law or MULS) is the law school of Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is one of two law schools in Wisconsin and the only private law school in the state. Founded in 1892 as the Milwaukee University Law School, MULS is housed in Eckstein Hall on Marquette University's campus in downtown Milwaukee.[2][3]

Overview[edit]

Marquette University Law School, MU Interchange

Marquette University is a Catholic institution operated by the Jesuit order. The law school's mission includes a commitment to the Jesuit idea of cura personalis ("care of the entire person"), a duty to promote diversity, and a goal of encouraging its "students to become agents for positive change in society."[4]

As of 2011, the school has 743 students and 94 faculty members and administrators, including 35 full-time, six "other full-time," 11 deans, librarians, and others who teach, and 42 part-time. For the fall 2011 entering J.D. class, there were 213 enrolled students (188 full-time and 25 part-time).[1]

Wisconsin, unique among American states, allows graduates of accredited law schools within the state to be admitted to the Wisconsin state bar without taking the state's bar examination if they complete certain requirements in their law school courses and achieve a certain level of performance in those courses, a practice known as the "diploma privilege."[5]

History[edit]

Aitken Reading Room

Marquette University Law School was born out of Marquette University's 1908 acquisition of the Milwaukee Law Class and the Milwaukee University Law School. First known as the Marquette University College of Law, the school added a day division to the two predecessors' evening programs. The first dean was James Graham Jenkins, a retired judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. In 1916, the first edition of the Marquette Law Review was published, and in 1923, the college's name was changed to Marquette University Law School. A year later, the school moved into Sensenbrenner Hall. A law review article at the time described the building's interior: "four large lecture rooms and a large Moot Court room" and a "third floor [to] be occupied entirely by the library capable of holding 50,000 volumes." [6] The law school became a member of the Association of American Law Schools in 1912 and received American Bar Association approval in 1925. The evening program was suspended in 1924 as part of the accreditation process, and was not restored for decades.

It was under Dean Robert Boden that the modern law school emerged. He took over as acting dean in June 1965, and served as dean until his death in 1984. During those nearly 20 years, the size of the full-time faculty tripled, the student body nearly doubled, and the law library doubled the size of its collection.[7] Boden also oversaw a significant increase in the physical plant of the law school, making two major additions to Sensenbrenner Hall.[7] Moreover, in January 1968, the law library moved into the newly constructed Legal Research Center, appended to the west side of Sensenbrenner Hall. The move was managed by Professor Mary Alice Hohmann, the first woman to teach a law course at MULS.[8]

In fall 2010, the school moved into the new Eckstein Hall.[9] The school also recently received the two largest gifts in its history: $51 million from alumni Ray and Kay Eckstein for Eckstein Hall, and $30 million from real estate developer Joseph Zilber, the bulk of which will endow scholarships.[10] Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia spoke at the September 8, 2010 dedication ceremony.[11]

Facilities[edit]

In September 2010, the Law School opened $85 million Eckstein Hall in downtown Milwaukee. The building was largely funded by donations from Ray and Kay Eckstein, Joseph Zilber, Wylie Aitken,[12] and the Bradley Foundation. Zilber and Sheldon Lubar contributed provided funding for scholarships, research and other law school programs.[3][13][11]

Eckstein Hall is located on the eastern end of the Marquette campus, two blocks from the Milwaukee County Courthouse and a mile from the Federal Courthouse. At 200,000 square feet, the building is four stories tall. It includes a four-story "library without borders,"[14] two mock courtrooms, a four-story atrium (the Zilber Forum), a cafeteria, a workout facility, a conference center, classrooms and faculty offices.[15][16] The classrooms were all designed as "smart classrooms" with projectors, cameras, audio recording, and individual microphones built into classroom seating.[17][18]

Academics[edit]

Fourth Floor of Eckstein Hall

Marquette University Law School offers two degrees, the Juris Doctor (J.D.), the largest program,[19] and the LL.M in Sports Law program, for foreign attorneys only.[20] The school's National Sports Law Institute, established in 1989, is affiliated with the LL.M. program and also conducts other activities.[21]

The school has five clinical programs as of spring 2012: Mediation Clinic, Unemployment Compensation Advocacy Clinic, Restorative Justice Clinic (part of the Marquette University Law School Restorative Justice Initiative), Prosecutor Clinic (placement at the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office), and Public Defender Clinic (placement in the Trial Division of the Wisconsin State Public Defender’s Office in Milwaukee).[22] U.S. News and World Report placed Marquette #8 among 14 alternative dispute resolution programs ranked in 2013.[23]

Marquette offers seven joint degree programs: J.D./M.B.A. and J.D./M.B.A. in Sports Business (with the College of Business Administration); J.D./M.A. in Political Science and J.D./M.A. in International Affairs (with the Department of Political Science); J.D./M.A. in Bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin; J.D./M.A. Social and Applied Philosophy and J.D./M.A. History of Philosophy (with the Department of Philosophy).[24]

Statistics[edit]

Eckstein Hall with the Milwaukee County Courthouse in the background.

For the fall 2012 entering J.D. class, there were 224 enrolled students (201 full-time and 23 part-time). The age range was 20-40, with the average age being 24. The median undergraduate GPA of incoming students was 3.40 (with the 25th percentile being 3.15 and the 75th percentile at 3.56) and the median LSAT score was 155 (with the 25th percentile being 153 and the 75th percentile at 158). Some 53 percent of students were Wisconsin residents. In total, 30 states, plus the District of Columbia, were represented. There were 100 undergraduate institutions and 58 undergraduate majors represented. Six percent of the class holds a separate graduate or technical degree.[1][25] The Law School's websites lists some 40 student organizations.[26]

Employment Outcomes: Based on 2013 data submitted by law schools to the American Bar Association, Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar, 54% of graduates obtained full-time, long term positions requiring bar admission (i.e., jobs as lawyers), within 9 months of graduation.[27] Marquette Law's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 18.7%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[28]

In 2013, U.S. News and World Report ranked the law school 94th in the nation.[29]

Tuition for the law school is $39,850 for full-time J.D. students and $1,590 per credit for part-time J.D. students. [30] In a typical year some one-third of students receive merit-based scholarships.[31] The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years is $231,557.[32]

Media[edit]

Marquette University Law School publishes four law journals: the flagship Marquette Law Review, the Marquette Sports Law Review (sports law), the Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review (intellectual property law) and the Marquette Elder's Advisor (elder law). The Marquette Sports Law Review was the first biannual scholarly journal devoted entirely to issues in sports law.[33] The Marquette Elder's Advisor, established in 1999,[34] is one of only two student-edited elder law reviews in the nation.[35][36]

The Marquette Law Review was established in 1916 and is published quarterly. As of 2012, it ranked 164th among student-edited general law journals in a combined score based on citation impact-factor and currency-factor.[37] Among specialized student-edited law journals, the Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review ranks 133rd, the Marquette Sports Law Review ranks 231st, and the Marquette Elder's Advisor ranks 310rd under the same citation-impact methodology.[35] Among student-edited intellectual property law journals, the Marquette Intellectual Property Law Review ranks 27th of 49 in a combined impact-factor and currency-factor score. Among arts, entertainment, and sports law journals, the Marquette Sports Law Review ranks 10th of 25 in a combined impact-factor and currency-factor score.[35]

By arrangement with the Federation of Defense and Corporate Counsel, MULS faculty and students edit the FDCC Quarterly, a practitioners' journal for attorneys who defend clients in cases involving torts, products liability, environmental law, and other civil claims.[38]

Mike Gousha, Distinguished Fellow in Law and Public Policy, hosts On the Issues with Mike Gousha, an interview program that presents national and local public figures before an audience of faculty, students, and interested members of the general public. [39]

Deans[edit]

  • Joseph D. Kearney, 2003–present
  • Howard B. Eisenberg, 1995–2002
  • Frank DeGuire, 1984–1994
  • Robert F. Boden, 1965–1984[40]
  • Reynolds C. Seitz
  • Francis X. Swietlik
  • Clifton Williams
  • Max Schoetz, 1916–1927[41]
  • James Graham Jenkins, 1908–1915

Notable faculty[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

Marquette Law's alumnus (1935) U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy

Government and Politics

Judiciary

Academia

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "History | Marquette University Law School". Law.marquette.edu. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 
  3. ^ a b Marquette Law School to dedicate Eckstein Hall
  4. ^ Message from the Dean Marquette University Law School. [1]
  5. ^ "Wisconsin Lawyer December 2002: Editorial - Is it Time to End the Bar Exam? | State Bar of Wisconsin". Wisbar.org. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 
  6. ^ "Law School History" Marquette University Law School.
  7. ^ a b John J. Kircher, Dean Robert F. Boden: A Retrospective, 67 Marquette Law Review, pp. xi, xiii (1983).
  8. ^ Robert F. Boden, In Memorial: Mary Alice Hohmann, 65 Marquette Law Review, p. 501 (1982)
  9. ^ Eckstein Hall MULS's Ray and Kay Eckstein Hall.
  10. ^ "Zilber Makes $30M Gift to Marquette Law School", Milwaukee Business Journal, Aug. 20, 2007.
  11. ^ a b At new hall, Scalia stresses teaching" (September 8, 2011). Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  12. ^ Marquette Tribune, Feb. 2, 2010, http://marquettetribune.org/2010/02/02/news/law-school-donation-largest-from-practicing-attorney/
  13. ^ State Bar of Wisconsin, Marquette's new law school
  14. ^ "Eckstein Hall - Library without borders". Law.marquette.edu. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 
  15. ^ Eckstein Hall
  16. ^ "Marquette University's new building gives law school vital space" (September 5, 2010). Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  17. ^ Marquette University Law School Smart Classrooms
  18. ^ State Bar of Wisconsin: Marquette’s new law school promotes both traditional and modern law study
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  20. ^ "LL.M. in Sports Law for foreign lawyers | Marquette University Law School". Law.marquette.edu. Retrieved 2012-02-04. 
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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°02′13″N 87°55′38″W / 43.036917°N 87.927125°W / 43.036917; -87.927125