Marsh Harbour Airport

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Marsh Harbour Airport
IATA: MHHICAO: MYAM
Summary
Airport type Public
Serves Marsh Harbour, Abaco Islands, Bahamas
Elevation AMSL 6 ft / 2 m
Coordinates 26°30′41″N 077°05′01″W / 26.51139°N 77.08361°W / 26.51139; -77.08361Coordinates: 26°30′41″N 077°05′01″W / 26.51139°N 77.08361°W / 26.51139; -77.08361
Map
MYAM is located in Bahamas
MYAM
MYAM
Location in The Bahamas
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
09/27 1,523 4,997 Asphalt
Source: DAFIF[1][2]

Marsh Harbour Airport (IATA: MHHICAO: MYAM) is an airport serving Marsh Harbour, a town in the Abaco Islands in The Bahamas.[1]

Marsh Harbour is a major tourist attraction in the Bahamas. The airport offers service to Nassau and a few Florida cities. The government has been trying to expand the airport for years; recently a new runway was built to allow larger, regional jets to operate in and out of Marsh Harbour, while a new airport terminal is under construction.

Facilities[edit]

The airport resides at an elevation of 6 ft (1.8 m) above mean sea level. It has one runway designated 09/27 with an asphalt surface measuring 1,523 m × 30 m (4,997 ft × 98 ft).[1] As of December 2009, the old runway is being converted to a taxiway as the new 6,100 ft (1,859 m) runway has opened. According to the Abaconian newspaper, the government is looking at the construction of a new terminal at Marsh Harbour to replace the current terminal, which is too small for the number of operators at that facility.

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Scheduled passenger service from this airport is provided by the following airlines:

Airlines Destinations
American Eagle Miami
Bahamasair Nassau, West Palm Beach
Craig Air Center Seasonal:Jacksonville, St. Augustine
Silver Airways Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, West Palm Beach, Jacksonville
SkyBahamas Nassau
WesternAir Nassau

Accidents[edit]

On August 25, 2001, at 6:45 pm (EST), Aaliyah and various members of the record company boarded a twin-engine Cessna 402B (registration N8097W) at the Marsh Harbour Airport in Abaco Islands, The Bahamas, to travel to the Opa-locka Airport in Florida, after they completed filming the music video for the single "Rock the Boat".[68] They had a flight scheduled the following day, but with filming finishing early, Aaliyah and her entourage were eager to return to the United States and made the decision to leave immediately. The designated airplane was smaller than the Cessna 404 in which they had originally flew in on. The whole party and all of the equipment were accommodated on board.[69] As a result, when the aircraft attempted to depart, it was over its maximum takeoff weight by 700 pounds (320 kg) and was carrying one excess passenger, according to its certification.[70] The plane crashed shortly after takeoff, about 200 feet (60 m) from the runway.[68] Aaliyah and the eight others on board, pilot Luis Morales III, hair stylist Eric Forman, Anthony Dodd, security guard Scott Gallin, video producer Douglas Kratz, stylist Christopher Maldonado, and Blackground Records employees Keith Wallace and Gina Smith, were all killed.[71] According to findings from an inquest, conducted by the coroner's office in The Bahamas, Aaliyah suffered from "severe burns and a blow to the head", in addition to severe shock and a weak heart.[72] The coroner theorized that, even if Aaliyah had survived the crash, her recovery would have been virtually impossible given the severity of her injuries.[73] The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report stated that "the airplane was seen lifting off the runway, and then nose down, impacting in a marsh on the south side of the departure end of runway 27 and then exploding in flames."[74] It indicated that the pilot was not approved to fly the plane he was attempting to fly. Morales falsely obtained his Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) license by showing hundreds of hours never flown, and he may also have falsified how many hours he had flown in order to get a job with his employer, Blackhawk International Airways.[75] Additionally, an autopsy performed on Morales revealed traces of cocaine and alcohol in his system.[76] The NTSB reported that the maximum allowed gross weight of the plane was "substantially exceeded" and that the center of gravity was positioned beyond its rear limit.[74] John Frank of the Cessna Pilots Association stated that the plane was "definitely overloaded".[77]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Airport information for MYAM at World Aero Data. Data current as of October 2006.Source: DAFIF.
  2. ^ Airport information for MHH at Great Circle Mapper. Source: DAFIF (effective Oct. 2006).

External links[edit]